Brian Hardzinski

Operations/Public Service Announcement Director/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered. Brian returned to KGOU as the Operations and Public Service Announcement Director in January 2009. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014. Brian’s past work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, running, and playing tennis.

Pages

World Views
12:14 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Economic Lessons Europe Learned (Or Didn’t Learn) During The 20th Century

People walk past the former barrier between East and West Berlin after the Fall of Berlin Wall in November 1989.
Credit Raphaël Thiémard / Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Boston University historian Jonathan Zatlin.

Allied powers divided war-torn Germany into four zones of occupation after World War II, with three of those zones uniting in 1949 to form what became known as West Germany.

The Soviet Union controlled the fourth zone, and East Germany remained within the Eastern Bloc’s sphere of influence for the next four decades.

Boston University modern European historian Jonathan Zatlin says the divided nation served as a tripwire for all the tensions of the Cold War, and that Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin worried a united Germany posed a security risk.

Read more
World Views
4:30 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

World Views: November 1, 2013

Listen to the entire November 1, 2013 episode.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the implications of the Roma child found living with a couple in Greece, and the October 26 protest by Saudi women in defiance of the country's traditions against driving.

Later, a conversation about water and sanitation in Africa with the University of Oklahoma 2013 International Water Prize winner Ada Oko-Williams, and University College London hydrogeologist Richard Taylor.

Read more
World Views
2:52 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

Saudi Arabia Warns Online Backers Of Women Drivers

Credit Edward Musiak / Flickr Creative Commons

On October 26 dozens of Saudi women got behind the wheel in defiance of the country’s traditions. Though no specific law bans women from driving, the rules are enforced by Saudi Arabia's powerful Islamic establishment.

Rebecca Cruise, the Assistant Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies, says even though the issue seems to be gaining traction, she’s heard critics argue it’s symbolic of larger issues Saudi women face.

Read more
World Views
1:22 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

Now That Parents Identified, Fate Of Girl Found With Greek Roma Couple Uncertain

Roma (Gypsy) street beggers crouching to keep warm on the steps of the Russian Orthodox Church in Sofia, Bulgaria.
Credit Lori Scott / Wikimedia Commons

DNA tests confirm that a Bulgarian Roma, or Gypsy, couple living in an impoverished village with their nine other children are the biological parents of the girl named Maria found in Greece with another couple.

The Greek Roma couple has been charged with abducting the girl and committing document fraud. Under Greek law, child abduction charges can include cases where a minor is voluntarily given away by the parents.

Rebecca Cruise, the Assistant Dean of the University of Oklahoma's College of International Studies, calls the issue “a clear case of discrimination” against people of Roma descent.

Read more
World Views
12:06 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

Amount Of Water In Africa Not The Problem, But Delivery To People

Women and children gather around a communal water pump in Lulimba, Democratic Republic of The Congo.
Credit Julien Harneis / Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Ada Oko-Williams and Richard Taylor.

Ada Oko-Williams grew up in Nigeria, a country with more than 160 million people, but where only half the population has access to safe drinking water. Even fewer people have acceptable sanitary facilities.

She now lives and works in Sierra Leone, and over the past half-decade has worked with charities and non-governmental organizations in West Africa to create open-defecation free communities that benefit hundreds of thousands of people. Oko-Williams says the health problems associated with unsafe drinking water are well-known, but there are other dimensions to a lack of access.

Read more
A-F Grades Flap
11:55 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Oklahoma School Grading Problems Continue

Credit amboo who? / Flickr Creative Commons

The Oklahoma State Department of Education has confirmed local school leaders' accounts of significant fluctuations in preliminary A-F grades for schools.

Schools had a Monday deadline to request that the state correct or otherwise verify their new school grade cards. On Friday, State Superintendent Janet Barresi said her department needed up to two more weeks before asking the state Board of Education to finalize the report cards and release them publicly.

Read more
World Views
4:30 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

World Views: October 25, 2013

Listen to the entire October 25, 2013 episode.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss record levels of smog that are forcing the closure of schools and businesses in Northeast China, and heavy-handed tactics by Russia toward its former Soviet neighbors.

University of Oklahoma historian Kyle Harper joins the program to talk about how smallpox and the bubonic plague contributed to the fall of the Roman Empire. His latest project focuses on the effects of disease and climate change on the history of civilization.

Read more
World Views
2:59 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

European Union Warns Russia Over Ukraine, Moldova Pressure

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev
Credit Presidential Press and Information Office / maiak.info / Flickr Creative Commons

European Union trade ministers are warning Russia to stop pressuring neighborhood countries that seek closer ties with the EU.

Suzette Grillot, the Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies, says since the end of the Cold War, countries that once served as Russia’s “buffer zone” increasingly look to the West.

Read more
World Views
1:24 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

Heavy Smog Hits North China City, Flights Canceled

Credit Nicolò Lazzati / Flickr Creative Commons

Severe smog has reduced the visibility of a northern Chinese city to less than half a football field.

Rebecca Cruise, the Assistant Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies, says Chinese authorities blame the increase on two things: a lack of wind, and more smoke in the air.

Read more
World Views
12:18 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

Germ Theory: How Disease And Climate Change Toppled The Roman Empire

The Roman Colosseum - September 26, 2009.
Credit Yellow.Cat / Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with historian Kyle Harper.

University of Oklahoma historian Kyle Harper says there have been thousands of answers to what caused the fall of the Roman Empire. Overexpansion, economics, and the rise of Christianity are all valid explanations, but he’s exploring the role of disease and climate change.

“When we look back at the Roman Empire now, we can see that changes in the Romans' environment, both the climate, but also the kind of species that live in and around humans, especially pathogens, play an enormous role in the collapse,” Harper says.

Read more

Pages