Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered.

Brian joined KGOU full time in 2009 as the station's Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015. Brian’s work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier named Bucky.

Ways to Connect

U.S. Sen. James Lankford, R-Oklahoma, talks with the media outside police headquarters in Guthrie, Okla, Friday, July 8, 2016. Lankford visited with police officers during a private meeting.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

U.S. Sen. James Lankford says he thinks racial tension in this country could be improved if people intentionally spent more time with each other in their homes.

During a floor speech Thursday, the state's junior Republican Senator suggested what he called "Solution Sundays" – sharing a meal with a person or family of a different race once a week in order to have a greater dialogue about race in the country.

Oklahoma state Capitol
elasticsoul / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

A panel established last year to study billions of dollars in tax credits and incentives met at the state Capitol Thursday to figure out what criteria they’ll use during their examination.

The Incentive Evaluation Commission will meet annually, and this year plan to look at a five-year property tax exemption for new and expanding manufacturing. The Associated Press says it costs about $67 million per year.

Oklahoma’s multicounty grand jury has indicted a regent for the Regional University System of Oklahoma who’s also a former state lawmaker and rural electric cooperative CEO.

Terry Matlock faces 11 counts of embezzlement and one count of engaging in a pattern of criminal offenses. He’s accused of using Choctaw Electric Cooperative employees for work on his property, and using company funds for agriculture equipment, The Oklahoman’s Kyle Schwab reports:

A member of the black student protest group Concerned Student 1950 gestures while addressing a crowd following the announcement that University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe would resign, at the university in Columbia, Mo. - Nov. 9, 2015
Jeff Roberson / AP

From South Africa, to Palestine, to Haiti, to a small college town in the middle of the United States, you’ll find injustice everywhere.

Clemson University women’s leadership lecturer Saadiqa Lundy has created empowerment and development programs in Africa and the Caribbean, But when Lundy met her husband Chenjerai Kumanyika, she became more of an activist and a protester. She says teaching a subject like that is completely different than actually being there.

Steve Hahn, president of AT&T Oklahoma, speaks at the Reservation Economic Summit in Tulsa Tuesday.
Rip Stell / The Journal Record

This week tribal and business leaders met just outside of Tulsa for the Reservation Economic Summit.

Reaina Harris is diversion program coordinator with Red Rock Behavioral Health Services, which partners with the Midwest City Police Department to provide mental health and substance abuse programs to prisoners.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Midwest City Jail officials are trying to break the cycle of repeat offenders in their custody.

Police Chief Brandon Clabes says mental health and substance abuse services for inmates are offered in almost all of Oklahoma’s 77 counties, but Midwest City is the only town to do it at the municipal level, The Journal Record’s Christie Tapp reports:

Two women join hands with Oklahoma City police officers to pray during a Black Lives Matter rally in Oklahoma City, Sunday, July 10, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Organizers of Sunday's Black Lives Matter rally in Bricktown praised Oklahoma City police for their response and restraint during the event. Oklahoma City officers mostly provided security, and at one point created a perimeter between the activists and counter-protesters across the street.

"I’ll be honest, they have been absolutely great,” said Karen Gaines, one of the event’s three primary organizers. “They have been tremendously helpful, just all the way around. They’ve asked us if we needed anything. They were very supportive actually.”

A resident sits outside Hennessey Care Center. The nursing home is one of six in the state that will be transferred into receivership while the landlord finds a new operator.
The Hennessey Clipper

A company that bought six nursing homes across rural Oklahoma this month also acquired more than $500,000 in overdue lease payments from the homes’ operator, and the homes can’t pay their rent.

Trinik Holdings wants to bring in a new tenant, but said in court filings that simply evicting the operator would be harmful to the residents who need specialized care.

Gov. Mary Fallin responds to a question during an interview in Oklahoma City, Thursday, July 7, 2016. Fallin says she's had no direct contact with Donald Trump's presidential campaign about serving as his vice president.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Gov. Mary Fallin says both Republican and Democratic presidential candidates, and anyone currently in public service, should relay a message of equal justice.

Fallin told CNN's Jake Tapper on Sunday’s State of the Union she believes Donald Trump is trying to campaign as a racial healer in the aftermath of violence last week in Louisiana, Minnesota, and Texas.

Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

More than one thousand people marched through downtown Oklahoma City for a protest against the treatment of African-Americans by law enforcement, and to honor the five officers killed Thursday in Dallas.

The group gathered just north of Bricktown and marched down the Walnut Ave. bridge past the Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark and assembled near the fountain in front of the Harkins Theatre.

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