KGOU

Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered.

Brian joined KGOU full time in 2009 as the station's Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015. Brian’s work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier named Bucky.

Ways to Connect

U.S. men's gymnastics coach Mark Williams says he could sit down for a meal in the Olympic Village and overhear conversations in five different language. He'll share his experiences from Rio de Janeiro and his thoughts on sports diplomacy in a conversation with Suzette Grillot.

But first, Rebecca Cruise talks with University of Oklahoma anthropologist Noah Theriault about the Philippines' new president and his controversial tactics to confront drug trafficking and violence in his country.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte steps out of his limousine upon arrival at Merdeka Palace to meet Indonesian counterpart Joko Widodo in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Sept. 9, 2016.
Dita Alangkara / AP

The world’s eyes turned to the Philippines this week after President Rodrigo Duterte made disparaging remarks about President Obama during his visit to Asia. It’s not the first time Duterte’s comments have made international news since he took office in June, previously criticizing the U.S. and U.K.

FiveThirtyEight compared Oklahoma's fault line locations to wastewater disposal well sites to see if it helps explain why north-central portions of the state have seen a recent uptick in seismic activity.

Doors are closed at ITT Technical Institute’s campus inside 50 Penn Place in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuch / The Journal Record

Earlier this week ITT Technical Institute immediately closed every campus across the country. Filings last year with the Securities and Exchange Commission show that affects nearly 45,000 sites, including two in Oklahoma.  – one in Oklahoma City, the other in Tulsa.

Midwest City-Del City Superintendent Rick Cobb walks through an unfinished classroom at Parkview Elementary School Wednesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma public schools issued hundreds of millions of dollars in debt last year through a risky financing scheme that may be unconstitutional.

Over the past dozen years, more Oklahoma schools have issued lease revenue bonds as a way to raise money for school construction and equipment. But finance experts told lawmakers on Wednesday that the state constitution doesn’t allow it.

Willy Jones, one of the area organizers for Oklahomans for Health, holds a sign in support of medical marijuana during a petition drive outside a vapor shop in Oklahoma City, Thursday, July 3, 2014.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

An attorney representing a group trying to legalize medical marijuana in Oklahoma filed a lawsuit Tuesday in the state Supreme Court.

The legal action challenges Attorney General Scott Pruitt’s rewritten ballot language for State Question 788, which will not go before voters this fall.

Oklahoma state Treasurer Ken Miller speaks during a news conference n Oklahoma City, Wednesday, July 8, 2015.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

State treasurer Ken Miller says gross receipts to Oklahoma’s treasury declined for the 18th consecutive month, and Oklahoma’s unemployment rate is higher than the national number for the first time in 26 years.

“We keep scouring through the data to find signs of an impending turnaround, but it’s just not there,” Miller said in a statement. “Some aspects of the August report aren’t as negative as in prior months – a few revenue streams have ticked up slightly – but we can’t yet point to a positive trend.”

A team of earthquake scientists deploys 12" sensors in a field near Pawnee after Saturday's 5.6 magnitude earthquake.
StateImpactOK / Instagram

More than a dozen wastewater disposal wells in the Osage Nation have been shut down after Saturday’s earthquake – one of the strongest in Oklahoma history.

Volkswagen grill
Benjamin Shaw / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

A consumer protection lawsuit the state filed against Volkswagen is on hold for another month. A federal judge turned down Attorney General Scott Pruitt’s request that the Volkswagen lawsuit should be handled in state court.

The judge wrote that a judicial panel will decide later this month whether to bundle Oklahoma’s lawsuit with others that involve “common questions of fact.”

ACT test book
Seth Perlman / AP

Eighty-two percent of high school seniors took the ACT this past school year, with more than 1,700 scoring 30 or higher.

State Regents for Higher Education Director of Student Preparation Matt Higdon said that's due to better accessibility, eCapitol’s Tyler Talley reports:

He said an expected dip in the state's composite score was expected due to wider accessibility. Oklahoma's ACT Composite Score dropped from 20.7 to 20.4 after remaining steady for the past eight years.

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