KGOU

Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered.

Brian joined KGOU full time in 2009 as the station's Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015. Brian’s work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier named Bucky.

Charles Dharapak` / AP

U.S. Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., says he supports investigating whether or not Russia was involved in the 2016 election process.

During an interview Sunday evening with Fox News, Lankford, who serves on the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, confirmed there is evidence of Russian interference through cyber-breaches and propaganda. But he said there's no evidence Russia interfered in the vote-counting process or election results.

Russian and Syrian army soldiers gather at the last checkpoint before the front line with rebels, in Karam al-Tarab, east of Aleppo, Syria, Sunday, December 4.
Hassan Ammar / AP

Syrian forces have now seized control of more than half of the territory in Aleppo once held by rebels who opposite President Bashar al-Assad, and supporters of the Assad regime expect victory in the country’s largest city.

It’s a crushing blow to the opposition, and could trigger a domino effect as rebels retreat to more rural areas of Syria.

The GE Global Research Center in Oklahoma City.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Over the next week City Council members will consider adding a new tax increment finance, or TIF, district to Oklahoma City.

University of Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) celebrates a touchdown pass to wide receiver Dede Westbrook (11) during the second half of the Red River Rivalry game in Dallas Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016. Oklahoma won 45-40.
LM Otero / AP

Two University of Oklahoma football players will be in New York City this weekend as finalists for one of their sport's most prestigious awards.

The trust that oversees the Heisman Trophy announced Monday evening quarterback Baker Mayfield and wide receiver Dede Westbrook are both finalists for the award.

Westbrook set OU's single-season record for touchdown catches with 16 this year, and his nearly 1,500 receiving yards in 2016 are the second-most in school history in a single year.

Art Rutledge looks over a shipment of liquor at Vice Spirits, Wine, Beer at 317 N. Walker Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The Retail Liquor Association of Oklahoma is finalizing legal action it promised to take after the passage of State Question 792 in November.

The ballot initiative would change the state's laws to allow wine and cold beer to be sold in grocery and convenience stores, starting in 2018. The Retail Liquor Association’s attorney Ann Gervais Richard told The Journal Record's Molly Fleming the lawsuit could come in the next few weeks:

Gov. Mary Fallin and her husband Wade Christensen look out from an elevator as she arrives at Trump Tower, Monday, Nov. 21, 2016 in New York.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

Two high-level officials in Oklahoma are under consideration for President-elect Donald Trump’s administration, but state law is particular about who can fill their seats if one or both move to Washington.

Gov. Mary Fallin and Attorney General Scott Pruitt have both met with Trump as he forms his Cabinet. Fallin is rumored to be a candidate for Secretary of the Interior, and Pruitt’s name has been floated for a role within the Environmental Protection Agency.

World Views: December 2, 2016

Dec 2, 2016

University of Nebraska political scientist Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado joins Suzette Grillot to discuss the legacy of Fidel Castro, who died November 25.

Then Suzette talks with Ned Breslin about the 20 years he spent in Africa working on water and sanitation issues.

Computer screen with heathcare.gov open.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Seven weeks from now Donald Trump will become the 45th president of the United States. One of his signature campaign promises involved repealing or changing the hallmark legislative achievement of his predecessor – the Affordable Care Act.

Overhauling or undoing such a complex healthcare law nationwide won’t be a simple task, according to The Journal Record’s editor-in-chief Ted Streuli.

Sara Hill, Cherokee Nation secretary of the environment and natural resources, stands outside the Cherokee Nation Courthouse in Tahlequah.
Kirby Lee Davis / The Journal Record

The Cherokee Nation has sued the federal government, and wants to know details about how it has managed its property throughout history.

Washington has historically overseen certain assets of recognized tribes, like property or money earned off leasing or selling that land.

Dan Boren in his office in Oklahoma City, January 8, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

A pair of high-profile Oklahoma Democrats say they won't seek their party's nomination to replace term-limited Gov. Mary Fallin in two years, including Fallin's 2014 challenger and the last Democrat to hold federal elected office in the state.

Updated December 2, 12:27 p.m.

Oklahoma's House Minority Leader says he's taking a "serious look" at running for governor in 2018.

The unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Construction could resume as early as this spring on a long-delayed Native American museum near downtown Oklahoma City.

Even though the work stalled four years ago, the Chickasaw Nation and the City of Oklahoma City have almost resolved the final legal obstacles, The Journal Record's Brian Brus reports:

A recent court filing says the Tulsa Police Department's policy on the use of deadly force is unconstitutional.

In November 2014, Nathan Boyd was in the middle of a mental health episode when police officers approached his vehicle, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

The Pawnee Nation on Nov. 18 filed a lawsuit against two federal agencies. The suit mentions the 5.8-magnitude Labor Day weekend quake asks ”a judge to void recently approved drilling permits on tribal land and halt the issuance of new ones,” the Tulsa World reports.

The Arbuckle Mountain Wind Farm in southern Oklahoma.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

State officials will consider recommending cuts to tax credits Tuesday as they look for a way to bring more money into the state.

Oklahoma's Incentive Evaluation Commission is meeting at 1 p.m. at the state Capitol to discuss what will go into a final report it plans to submit to lawmakers and Gov. Mary Fallin next month.

Gov. Mary Fallin and her husband Wade Christensen look out from an elevator as she arrives at Trump Tower, Monday, Nov. 21, 2016 in New York.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

President-elect Donald Trump met with Gov. Mary Fallin on Monday to discuss a possible cabinet post. 

Updated 11:23 a.m.

Fallin emerged from Trump's office in Midtown Manhattan on Monday, saying she and the president-elect discussed his plan and agenda for the country and how she might be able to help.

"No, I was not offered a position. It was just an initial meeting to discuss a wide range of topics," Fallin told reporters gathered in the lobby of Trump Tower. The governor was accompanied by her husband Wade Christensen.

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