KGOU

Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski is from Flower Mound, Texas and a graduate of the University of Oklahoma. He began his career at KGOU as a student intern, joining KGOU full time in 2009 as Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015-16. Brian’s work at KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists. Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier, Bucky.

The unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Construction could resume as early as this spring on a long-delayed Native American museum near downtown Oklahoma City.

Even though the work stalled four years ago, the Chickasaw Nation and the City of Oklahoma City have almost resolved the final legal obstacles, The Journal Record's Brian Brus reports:

A recent court filing says the Tulsa Police Department's policy on the use of deadly force is unconstitutional.

In November 2014, Nathan Boyd was in the middle of a mental health episode when police officers approached his vehicle, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

The Pawnee Nation on Nov. 18 filed a lawsuit against two federal agencies. The suit mentions the 5.8-magnitude Labor Day weekend quake asks ”a judge to void recently approved drilling permits on tribal land and halt the issuance of new ones,” the Tulsa World reports.

The Arbuckle Mountain Wind Farm in southern Oklahoma.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

State officials will consider recommending cuts to tax credits Tuesday as they look for a way to bring more money into the state.

Oklahoma's Incentive Evaluation Commission is meeting at 1 p.m. at the state Capitol to discuss what will go into a final report it plans to submit to lawmakers and Gov. Mary Fallin next month.

Gov. Mary Fallin and her husband Wade Christensen look out from an elevator as she arrives at Trump Tower, Monday, Nov. 21, 2016 in New York.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

President-elect Donald Trump met with Gov. Mary Fallin on Monday to discuss a possible cabinet post. 

Updated 11:23 a.m.

Fallin emerged from Trump's office in Midtown Manhattan on Monday, saying she and the president-elect discussed his plan and agenda for the country and how she might be able to help.

"No, I was not offered a position. It was just an initial meeting to discuss a wide range of topics," Fallin told reporters gathered in the lobby of Trump Tower. The governor was accompanied by her husband Wade Christensen.

U.S. Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., talks to supporters during the Republican watch party in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.
J. Pat Carter / AP

U.S. Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., is urging President-elect Donald Trump to make nominating the next Director of National Intelligence a priority.

Lankford and U.S. Sen. Angus Young, I-Maine, sent a letter to the president-elect on behalf of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Thursday asking him to select someone who's interested in collaborating and limiting redundancies within the intelligence community.

The Nestle Purina plant at 13900 N. Lincoln Blvd. in Edmond.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Union workers in Edmond are suing their boss, and the fight started over tardy employees.

Two years ago, the Nestle Purina pet food manufacturing plant started a new attendance policy. If workers were late or didn’t show up, they would lose points.

The union eventually won an arbitration that showed Nestle Purina violated the employees’ bargaining agreement and also committed unfair labor practices, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Volunteers from the Kheir Zaman local supermarket sell a kilogram of sugar for 7.50 L.E. (0.84 US cents), in the Sayeda Zeinab neighborhood of Cairo, Egypt - October 26, 2016.
Nariman El-Mofty / AP

A week ago the International Monetary Fund approved a $12 billion loan to Egypt as the country slips into a perilous economic situation created by a declining currency, food shortages, and a strained relationship with a chief benefactor – Saudi Arabia.

“What we’re seeing from one end of the Middle East to the other is no money,” said Joshua Landis, the director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma. “You look at the spreadsheet for Egypt, and everything is moving in the wrong direction.”

Raul Font is president of the Latino Community Development Agency in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Immigration dominated the 2016 presidential election, with promises from President-elect Donald Trump to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico, and a clampdown on undocumented migrants from both Latin America and the Middle East.

Mass deportations could have a significant affect on Oklahoma City’s economy, especially south Oklahoma City, where there’s a significant Hispanic population.

Oklahoma Secretary of Finance Preston Doerflinger speaks during a meeting of the State Board of Equalization in Oklahoma City, Monday, June 20, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma's top budget official says he's not worrying about a revenue failure… yet.

This time last year, lawmakers were wringing their hands over sales tax figures that painted a dim view of state revenue. That’s when revenue was about 3 percent below the estimate used to build their budget.

Oklahoma Supreme Court Chief Justice John Reif administers the oath of offices to all 101 members of the Oklahoma House of Representatives at the state Capitol Wednesday.
Provided / Oklahoma House of Representatives

Oklahoma Supreme Court Chief Justice John Reif administered the oath of office to all 101 newly elected House members during a ceremony at the state Capitol Wednesday morning.

The state's lower chamber includes 32 new state Representatives, including seven new Democrats. The new members of the minority caucus include a former assistant to the mayor of Tulsa and a former schoolteacher.

State Rep. Monroe Nichols, D-Tulsa, said his biggest priority is education, but he’s also concerned about economic development and state tax policy.

Oklahoma State Capitol
LLudo / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Oklahoma's House Republicans picked their leadership for the next legislative session Tuesday, and formally elected state Rep. Charles McCall, R-Atoka, as the next House Speaker.

At the end of the 2016 session in May the caucus elected McCall as Speaker-designate, but yesterday allowed the 25 new GOP House members to weigh in on the leadership.

Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Updated Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Oklahoma City police say the suspect in a shooting Tuesday at the Will Rogers World Airport was a former employee at Southwest Airlines, and resigned his position in April 2015.

Police allege 45-year-old Lloyd Dean Buie shot and killed Michael Winchester on Tuesday shortly before 1:00 p.m. in the airport parking lot. Winchester was leaving work when Buie allegedly shot him with a rifle from a range of approximately 50 yards.

Winchester also worked at Southwest Airlines.

Oklahoma Department of Corrections Director Joe Allbaugh
Sue Ogrocki / AP

The Oklahoma Department of Corrections wants out of the state’s unified information technology system. Corrections director Joe Allbaugh criticized how the Office of Management and Enterprise Services runs the IT system during an interim legislative hearing Monday.

The SandRidge Energy Inc. logo is seen on a vehicle parked at the company headquarters in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Over the past week or so Oklahoma City’s energy companies have been releasing their quarterly earnings reports, and some of the more interesting numbers came from SandRidge Energy. After the stock market closed Tuesday, the company reported a net loss of $404 million for the quarter.

Oklahoma and Cleveland counties both gave the LP ticket more than 7 percent of the vote, and 8.36 percent of Stillwater’s Payne County voted for the Libertarian nominee.
Dale Denwalt / The Journal Record

Every Libertarian candidate in Oklahoma lost on Election Day, but party chair Tina Kelly used words like "exciting," "success," and "momentum" to describe Tuesday. That's because the party cleared a major hurdle.

A supporter of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at the Oklahoma Republican Party's watch party at Main Event in Oklahoma City
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

There were few surprises at the national level as Oklahoma voters overwhelmingly chose Republican nominee Donald Trump to become the 45th president of the United States.

A line forms outside the Crown Heights Christian Church in Oklahoma City shortly after 8 a.m. on Election Day, Nov. 8, 2016..
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Polls opened at 7 a.m. across Oklahoma, and the State Election Board says nearly 1,000 extra pollworkers are manning precincts today. Several polling places throughout the metro had long lines, with some voters waiting for anywhere from an hour to 90 minutes Tuesday morning.

Shawn Sheehan, Oklahoma's 2016 Teacher of the Year and an independent candidate for the Oklahoma Senate, stands in his classroom in Norman, October 20, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Of the 17 Libertarians in Oklahoma who filed to run in Tuesday's election, only three have raised enough money to face campaign finance reporting requirements.

Across the state, campaigns have raised more than $34 million, but less than 1 percent have gone to Libertarians or independent candidates, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Jim Calloway addresses the audience during an Oklahoma Bar Association conference on business skills at the Sheraton Oklahoma City Downtown Hotel on Wednesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

In today’s business climate, attorneys have to think more like a CEO who runs a company rather than someone who just practices law.

That’s according to Jim Calloway, who’s the head of the Oklahoma Bar Association’s Management Assistance Program.

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