KGOU

Caroline Halter

KGOU Producer/Reporter

Caroline produces World Views and Capitol Insider and does general assignment reporting. She joins KGOU from Marfa Public Radio, where she covered a wide range of local and regional issues in far west Texas. Previously, she reported on state politics for KTOO Public Media in Alaska and various outlets in Washington State.

Caroline has a bachelor’s degree in international studies from Seattle University and speaks Spanish proficiently. As part of her degree, she edited for a Tibetan newspaper in Northern India and conducted independent research in rural Kenya.

When Caroline’s not producing radio, she’s usually listening to it! To keep up with Caroline’s stories and programs, follow her on Twitter: @carolinehalter.

Ways to Connect

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In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley talk through the process and politics of the controversial health department rules for Oklahoma’s medical marijuana program, including a ban on products intended for smoking. These rules can be amended, but as Ashley explains, Republicans lack the political will to return to the capitol before the next legislative session. Democrats will likely turn it into a campaign issue.  

 

  FULL TRANSCRIPT:

Former state Rep. Joe Dorman meets with voters on the University of Oklahoma campus during his 2014 campaign for governor.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

In this extended episode of Capitol Insider, former state representative and 2014 Democratic gubernatorial candidate Joe Dorman joins KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley to discuss what political candidates are up to following the June 26 primary election.

Former state Rep. Joe Dorman meets with voters on the University of Oklahoma campus during his 2014 campaign for governor.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

 

In this episode of Capitol Insider, former state representative and 2014 Democratic gubernatorial nominee Joe Dorman joins KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley to discuss what political candidates are doing following the June 26 primary election. Dorman gives an insider perspective on day-to-day campaigning, local versus statewide strategies and the necessity of fundraising in today’s political system.

 

AP Photo/Bill Waugh

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley discuss what Todd Lamb’s loss means for the remaining gubernatorial candidates.

KGOU

In this hour-long special, KGOU’s Dick Pryor speaks with David Boren, who retired as president of the University of Oklahoma on June 30, 2018 after serving in the position for over two decades.

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

 

On this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley assess the results of Oklahoma’s June 26, 2018 primary election.

Voters approved State Question 788, which will legalize medical marijuana, by 58 percent. And approximately 25,000 more people cast votes for 788 than did for the governor’s race.

Mick Cornett speaks to his supporters after advancing to the Republican runoff primary election.
Joe Wertz / Oklahoma Engaged

Former Oklahoma City mayor Mick Cornett will face Tulsa businessman Kevin Stitt in a runoff for the Republican nomination for governor. 

Erik Hersman/Flickr

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley are joined once again by political scientist Keith Gaddie.

The three discuss the surge in voter registration ahead of the June 26 primary election, how State Question 788 could affect turnout and the three-way tie in the race for Oklahoma’s governorship.

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On Wednesday a U.S. Supreme Court decision reversed a 1992 precedent that said businesses were only required to pay sales tax if they had a physical presence in the state. It was welcome news for Oklahoma, which has been trying for years to force online companies to pay sales tax., which made up 31 percent of state revenue in 2017.

 

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Following the 2014-16 oil bust, Oklahoma’s oil production reached new heights. But gains in employment haven’t kept pace. The state’s oil and gas industry employs 20 percent fewer people than it did at the height of production last year, according to a new analysis by the Kansas City Federal Reserve.

USDA/Lance Cheung

The Chinese government plans to implement retaliatory tariffs on $50 billion worth of American goods next month. Although beef is on the list, Oklahoma cattlemen are also keeping an eye on pork tariffs.

 

 

China is an up and coming market for Oklahoma’s cattle ranchers. American producers just regained access to China as an export market when a 14-year ban on U.S. beef exports to the country was lifted last year.

Oklahoma state Rep. Kevin Calvey, R-Oklahoma City, speaks during a news conference in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. Calvey is term-limited out of the House, and 12 Republicans are vying to replace him.
Sue Ogrocki / AP Photo

Ahead of the June 26 primary election, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley are joined by University of Oklahoma political scientist Keith Gaddie to discuss the nearly 600 candidates running for office ahead this year in Oklahoma.

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

A Senate committee will vote Thursday, June 14,  on Oklahoma Supreme Court Justice Patrick Wyrick’s nomination to become a federal judge in Oklahoma’s Western District. Though he’s expected to be confirmed along party lines, the process has opened Wyrick up to scrutiny about his work under former Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, who now heads the Environmental Protection Agency.

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In this episode of Capitol Insider, StateImpact health reporter Jackie Fortier joins KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley to discuss State Question 788, which would legalize medical marijuana if it passes on June 26.

Pexels

 

In this extended episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley are joined by StateImpact health reporter Jackie Fortier to discuss State Question 788, which would legalize medical marijuana if it passes on June 26.

oil pump jack
Paul Lowry / Flickr

The money collected by the state of Oklahoma, or gross receipts, totaled $970 million in May. That’s up by 13.6 percent from the same month last year and an all-time record for the state. It’s part of a steep upward trend that can be traced back to January 2017, according to the Oklahoma State Treasurer’s office.

James Johnson/ Wikimedia Commons

 

On this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley discuss the  Agency Performance and Accountability Commission, a special commission created to audit state agencies that will have to restart its work after violating the Open Meeting Act.

Pryor and Ashley also review a decision from the Court of Criminal Appeals that will affect Oklahoma’s Stand Your Ground law, the future of the state’s opioid task force, and the newly appointed Secretary of State.

 

FULL TRANSCRIPT

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

 

The 2018 legislative session ended early, but planning for 2019 is already underway. KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley discuss new leadership in the Oklahoma Senate, along with details of the veto referendum on House Bill 1010XX, which could undo the tax increases for teacher pay raises.

Pryor and Ashley also discuss Gov. Mary Fallin’s “pocket veto” of a bill that would have allowed law enforcement to use their personal rifles and shotguns.

 

FULL TRANSCRIPT:

 

AP Photo/Susan Walsh

 

On Thursday President Trump signed legislation loosening the Dodd-Frank banking regulations enacted in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. The bill raises the threshold for banks considered “too big to fail,” exempting them from regulations like higher cash-on-hand requirements and increased mortgage loan scrutiny.  

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

Rising oil prices translated into healthier finances for the state of Oklahoma. But higher revenue numbers for April were overshadowed by news of financial mismanagement within one of the state’s largest agencies.

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