KGOU

Jacob McCleland

KGOU News Director

Jacob joined the KGOU News department in March 2015; previously he spent nine years as a reporter and host at public radio station KRCU in Cape Girardeau, Mo. His stories have appeared on NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered, Here & Now, Harvest Public Media and PRI’s The World. Jacob has reported on floods, disappearing languages, crop duster pilots, anvil shooters, Manuel Noriega, mule jumps and more.

He has a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and Spanish from Southeast Missouri State University and a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Illinois at Springfield.

Jacob warns us he won't answer the phone when the St. Louis Cardinals are playing a postseason game. Fun fact: his high school mascot is the Appleknocker.

Ways to Connect

In this May 5, 1995 file photo, a large group of search and rescue crew attends a memorial service in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City.
Bill Waugh / AP Photo

Richard Williams just walked out of a meeting in the Murrah Federal Building on the morning of April 19, 1995. He was talking with a colleague when the blast went off. It’s the last thing he remembers.

“I was dug out by an Oklahoma City policeman, taken to the university hospital where they treated me with triage and subsequently follow-up surgeries and physical therapy and all those kind of things for years,” Williams said.

The Devon Energy Center in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Crude oil prices continue to rise, but Oklahoma’s oil and gas companies are not necessarily popping any corks. Sarah Terry-Cobo writes in the Journal Record that crude oil hit its highest levels in three-and-a-half years on Friday, but it is more difficult to drillers to make a profit, even though prices have been near or above $60 per barrel since January.

Trucks pass each other along a rural road just off south of Kingfisher.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

A bill that would change how Oklahoma oversees trucking is drawing conflict of interest questions because the legislation’s sponsor owns trucks as part of his business.

A customer enters a Citibank, Thursday, March 16, 2017 in New York.
Mark Lennihan / AP Photo

National banking giant Citibank announced on March 21 that it would require retail clients to no longer sell firearms to customers under the age of 21. The bank is also requiring clients to no longer sell bump stocks and high-capacity magazines. The bank also condemned gun violence and what the financial institution considers a lack of action by lawmakers.

The interior of the 23rd Street Armory building, 200 NE 23rd St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Two different entities turned in three bids to describe what they plan to do with the old armory building and surrounding properties in Oklahoma City.
 

The 72,000 square foot state-owned armory sits at NE 23rd Street and Walnut, just west of the Capitol building. The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming tells KGOU the armory was built in the 1930s and was used by the National Guard until 2010.

James Gallogly speaks during a ceremony  announcing him as the 14th president of the University of Oklahoma on March 26, 2018.
Katie Reed / KGOU

A University of Oklahoma law school graduate who has nearly three decades of experience in the oil and gas industry will take over as the university’s fourteenth president.

The Board of Regents named James Gallogly, who graduated from OU Law in 1977, as the university’s next president on Monday morning. He will replace David Boren, who is retiring after 23 years.

Laboratory manager Karim Saadeddine prepares a soil sample for testing at TerraCon Consultants, 4701 N. Stiles Ave. in Oklahoma City. TerraCon holds a summer jobs program for teachers.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Oklahoma’s education department is looking for companies to host teachers this summer.

Last year, a pilot program placed teachers with companies that hire people in science, math, engineering and technology, or STEM, related fields. The state is trying to expand the program this year.

Ted Kuschel and Brandon Birdwell at their second School of Rock site at 7200 N. May Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

In some ways, a franchise is little bit like a business in a box, according to Journal Record reporter Molly Fleming. The concept has worked in other markets, so it already has a track record of some success.
 

“The branding is there. There's marketing power. And in some instances there's a team to help you get started,” Fleming said.

An Oscar statue at the 90th Academy Awards Governors Ball Press Preview on Thursday, March 1, 2018, in Los Angeles.
Richard Shotwell / Invision/AP

The glitz and glamor of Hollywood will gather on March 4 for the 90th Academy Awards. This year’s ceremony boasts several tight races, including for Best Foreign Language Film.

A drilling rig in northwestern Oklahoma's Mississippi Lime oil and gas play.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma oil and gas companies are examining how to take advantage of changes in corporate taxes.

President Donald Trump signed a GOP-backed bill to decrease the corporate tax rate from 35 to 21 percent in December.  Sarah Terry-Cobo writes in the Journal Record that there was a perception that the lower tax rate would result in stock buybacks, dividends and implicit payouts to corporate executives, according to University of Tulsa energy business professor Tom Seng.

In this July 16, 2016, file photo, Thailand's Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha waves as he arrives for a group photo of leaders at the 11th Asia-Europe Meeting (ASEM) in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.
Mark Schiefelbein / AP Photo

Thailand’s prime minister, Prayuth Chan-ocha, has called for elections several times since he took power following a military coup in 2014. And he has found a way to delay them each time.

This Jan. 31, 2018, photo shows shopping carts at a Costco in Homestead, Pa.
Gene J. Puskar / AP Photo

The second largest retail chain in the world is one step closer to bringing a store to Oklahoma City.

The Oklahoma City Economic Development Trust approved the beginning of negotiations Tuesday for a retail incentive agreement with Costco. 

National Weather Service

Another round of freezing rain could add another layer of ice across Oklahoma on Thursday. It will be the third wave of freezing rain in as many days.

Achy Obejas
Kaloian

Even though Achy Obejas’s family left Cuba when she was very young, the island nation has an enormous influence on her work.

Travelers have drinks at a bar inside Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Oklahoma’s new alcohol laws take effect in October, but how drinks will be taxed is still up in the air.

State Sen. Stephanie Bice, R-Oklahoma City, has filed legislation that would eliminate a 13.5 percent tax on full strength beer, wine  and drinks with spirits purchased at restaurants and bars, and replace it with a 6.5 percent alcohol tax at the distribution level.

Oklahoma City Mayor-elect David Holt.
City of Oklahoma City

For the first time in 14 years, somebody other than Mick Cornett will be the mayor of Oklahoma City.

 

But the city’s new mayor-elect already knows his way around the office.

In this photo taken Tuesday Aug. 6, 2013, residents of Puros, northern Namibia, stand at the entrance of a shop in the deserted town.
Jerome Delay / AP

Sharing small amounts of money with poor people can help alleviate poverty and spur economic growth.

In his book Give a Man a Fish: Reflections on the New Politics of Distribution, anthropologist James Ferguson focuses on the question of who is owned what. He is particularly interested in the question of what claims poor people have, and the kinds of resources that can be shared with them.

Adnan Mahmutovich
http://www.adnanmahmutovic.com/

Adnan Mahmutovic fled the war-torn former Yugoslavia as a teenager, and settled as a refugee in Sweden. He began working as a care assistant for a man who had suffered a stroke, and the job became his introduction to Swedish life.

Image of the gravitational lens RX J1131-1231 galaxy with the lens galaxy at the center and four lensed background quasars. It is estimated that there are trillions of planets in the central elliptical galaxy in this image.
University of Oklahoma.

Researchers at the University of Oklahoma believe they have detected planets outside the Milky Way.

Professor Xinya Dai and postdoctoral researcher Eduardo Guerras say they have detected the presence of a population of planets in a galaxy 3.8 billion light years away from Earth. It’s the first time planets have been detected in another galaxy.

Their research is published in Astrophysical Journal Letters.

The new Muscogee (Creek) Nation Community Hospital in Okemah.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Though gaming operations continue to be a large economic focus for Oklahoma’s tribes, they are continuing to reach out into other endeavors. These projects include healthcare, retail, manufacturing, agriculture and more.

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