KGOU

Jacob McCleland

KGOU News Director

Jacob joined the KGOU News department in March 2015; previously he spent nine years as a reporter and host at public radio station KRCU in Cape Girardeau, Mo. His stories have appeared on NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered, Here & Now, Harvest Public Media and PRI’s The World. Jacob has reported on floods, disappearing languages, crop duster pilots, anvil shooters, Manuel Noriega, mule jumps and more.

He has a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and Spanish from Southeast Missouri State University and a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Illinois at Springfield.

Jacob warns us he won't answer the phone when the St. Louis Cardinals are playing a postseason game. Fun fact: his high school mascot is the Appleknocker.

Ways to Connect

Poet Mahtem Shiferraw’s collection of poetry, Fuchsia, examines personal displacement and nomadism from the perspective of immigrants.

Shiferraw, who grew up in Eritrea and Ethiopia before moving to Los Angeles, says she was inspired by poetry as a child. She attended an Italian school in Ethiopia, where she was immersed in a culture that embraced poetry.

A group of people take a tour of Bricktown via the canal.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

To know how to attract more visitors to Oklahoma City, the city needs to know what we don’t have.

The Greater Oklahoma City Convention and Visitors Bureau is circulating surveys to 800 people to find why people come, and to help identify tourism gaps.

People watch a TV screen showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's New Year's speech, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018.
Ahn Young-joon / AP

Americans tend to be more interested in domestic policy than foreign policy, but they do pay attention and have opinions about international politics.

Workers hammer spikes into place on a new rail spur south of Kingfisher.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

A Houston-based company is planning to invest up to $40 million in a rail spur and transportation loading center near Kingfisher.

Zia Haider Rahman’s debut novel, In the Light of What We Know, covers a broad swath of topics, ranging from friendship, geopolitics, math and science.

The novel opens when an old friend appears at the narrator’s door, and the two men in their early forties have very different stories to tell about their lives.

Wine bottles in The Spirit Shop in Norman.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

As we start a new year, Journal Record editor Ted Streuli and KGOU’s Jacob McCleland highlight what could be some of the biggest themes in business news in 2018.

Construction at the Oklahoma Capitol is being paid for by bonds sold by the state.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Oklahoma’s budget shortfall and “cautious optimism” from the oil and gas sector were two of the largest themes in business news during 2017.

Speaking on KGOU’s The Business Intelligence Rerport, Journal Record editor Ted Streuli said the state’s budget woes had implications in healthcare, transportation, employment and the state’s image.

Peruvian farmers talk to a staff member of the aid group World Neighbors about getting a loan to invest in their guinea pig farm.
Julio Moscoso / World Neighbors

The Oklahoma City-based NGO World Neighbors works on a variety of development projects across the world. Lionel Vigil, Regional Director for Latin America and the Caribbean, says the NGO is focused on four components in his region: Sustainable agriculture, clean water, sanitation and savings and credit groups.

Suzette Grillot talks to Jacob McCleland about corruption allegations in Panama and HIV/AIDS rates among indigenous Panamanians.

Then, Suzette talks with World Neighbors' Regional Director for Latin American and Caribbean, about the NGO's development projects.

Amos Kofa studies in the library at the University of Oklahoma School of Law in Norman.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

As the number of applications for law schools decline nationwide, some universities are considering a shakeup to their admittance process.

Fourteen universities now allow students to submit GRE scores, instead of the  LSAT. Among the schools that have made the switch are Harvard, Columbia, Northwestern and Texas A&M.

In this July 2, 2017 photo, Veracruz state police patrol along the waterfront boulevard in Coatzacoalcos, Mexico.
Rebecca Blackwell / AP

The recent surge of violence in Mexico is due to greater competition for territory between drug cartels, according to a University of Oklahoma political scientist.

Charles Kenney told KGOU’s World Views the Mexican government’s war on drug cartels weakened some drug cartels, but others have stepped up to fill the void,  creating violence.

Nancy Parsons, CEO and president of CDR Assessment Group Inc., speaks at the 2020 Woman on Boards conference at Oklahoma City University’s Meinders School of Business.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Women comprise at least 20 percent of board members at only four publicly-traded corporations in Oklahoma. Those companies are Devon Energy Corp., OGE Energy Corp., Magellan Midstream Partners and Sonic Corp.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin appears following a news conference in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017.
Sue Ogracki / AP

Oklahoma legislators won’t have time to go last-minute Christmas shopping--Gov. Mary Fallin will call legislators back to the state capitol for a second special session that will begin on Dec.18.

Gulfport Energy Corp. offices at 3001 Quail Springs Pkwy. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

One Oklahoma City-based driller’s credit line was recently increased, which could be a sign the business is doing well.

SandRidge Energy headquarters in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

In an effort to move forward with the purchase of a Colorado-based energy company, SandRidge Energy issued a so-called “poison pill” Monday to stave off efforts by an activist investor to block the deal.

Poet Sasha Pimentel at the KGOU studios.
Storme Jones / KGOU

Even though she doesn’t speak Arabic and is not a Muslim, poet Sasha Pimentel says the call to prayer in Saudi Arabia has influenced her work.

Capt. Tony Riddles of the Norman Police Department, standing, watches as three volunteers from the audience tackle Sgt. Tim Smith, who acted as an armed gunman for an active shooter training workshop at Norman Regional Hospital on November 17, 2017.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

A consultant at a business that provides active shooter preparedness training says there is more demand for their service since July.

Gov. Mary  Fallin vetoed most of the state's revised budget bill on Friday, November 17, 2017.
Governor Mary Fallin's office

Citing a failure to address several of her requests when she called a special session of the state legislature and the use of one-time funds, Gov. Mary Fallin vetoed the vast majority of a budget bill Friday evening.

Workers construct Shift, an immersive art experience at Current Studio, 1218 N. Pennsylvania Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

A new immersive art project could help drive business to a shopping area and create economic opportunities for Oklahoma City artists.

Factory Obscura, a collective of artists, created an installation called SHIFT at Current Studio at 1218 N. Pennsylvania Ave. The art installation encourages visitors to “physically explore the full-sensory environment,” according to  Current Studio’s website.

U.S. President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping arrive for the state dinner with the first ladies at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017.
Thomas Peter / Pool Photo via AP

The relationship between China and the United States is difficult, but there is a chance for a harmonious path forward.

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