KGOU

Jacob McCleland

KGOU News Director

Jacob joined the KGOU News department in March 2015; previously he spent nine years as a reporter and host at public radio station KRCU in Cape Girardeau, Mo. His stories have appeared on NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered, Here & Now, Harvest Public Media and PRI’s The World. Jacob has reported on floods, disappearing languages, crop duster pilots, anvil shooters, Manuel Noriega, mule jumps and more.

He has a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and Spanish from Southeast Missouri State University and a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Illinois at Springfield.

Jacob warns us he won't answer the phone when the St. Louis Cardinals are playing a postseason game. Fun fact: his high school mascot is the Appleknocker.

Ways to Connect

Father Stanley Rother baptizes a child in Guatemala.
Archdiocese of Oklahoma City

The Catholic church will beatify a priest from Okarche, Oklahoma this weekend. Three assailants murdered Father Stanley Rother in Guatemala in 1981. Pope Francis declared last year that Rother is a martyr, setting the stage for him to possibly become a saint.

University of Oklahoma President David Boren talks with the media following his announcement that he will resign as head of the state's flagship university at the end of the current school year.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

University of Oklahoma President David Boren has announced his retirement at the end of this academic year.

Boren addressed the university Wednesday afternoon to a packed audience at the Reynolds Performing Arts Center in Holmberg Hall, where he announced he will step down.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the ongoing humanitarian crisis regarding the Rohingya in Myanmar, and Turkey's missile deal with Russia.

Then, Suzette talks with Gershon Lewental about corruption investigations into the family and associates of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attends the weekly cabinet meeting in Jerusalem Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017.
Ronen Zvulun / Pool Photo via AP

Allegations of corruption are circling Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, his family and inner circle. While Netanyahu has not been indicted yet, many of his close friends, colleagues and family have been ensnared in the investigations.

Three women chat in front of business storefronts in downtown Perry. State legislators hosted an interim study on Wednesday to evaluate what’s hindering businesses from locating in rural Oklahoma.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Business recruiters in Oklahoma say they need more tools to help attract companies to the state.

At a House interim study on Wednesday, economic development leaders indicated Oklahoma is losing out to other states because Oklahoma does not have a robust closing fund to help seal deals. A closing fund is state-appropriated money that can be used at the last minute to entice a company to set up shop.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss Canada's offer to accept DACA recipients, and the relationship between the United States and China.

Then, Suzette talks with Bansari Mehta about World Experiences Foundation. The organization holds its annual gala and awards ceremony on September 9.

Bansari Mehta
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

When Bansari Mehta first left India to pursue a master’s degree in Oklahoma, she was surprised by how often she was asked to point to her home country on the map.

“Those were the days that I realized that there is something that’s missing,” Bansari told KGOU’s World Views. “As lovely as the people of Oklahoma are, they did not have much of a broader understanding about things outside of the state or outside of the country.”

The former campus of Villa Teresa School at 1216 Classen Dr. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

An old Catholic school campus in downtown Oklahoma City has a new owner.

Marva Ellard and development partner Billy Woodring purchased the six-building Villa Teresa property this week for $5.5 million. They plan to redevelop it as a mixed-use property which could include a boutique hotel in the nuns’ convent and condominiums and townhouses on the rest of the area.

The oldest building on the Villa Teresa campus dates back to 1917, but it wasn’t until 1933 that the Carmelite Sisters opened the K-4 school. The school closed in 2012.

Nyla Ali Khan
Jim Johnson / KGOU

More than a year after the death of a popular young militant, Kashmir’s youth are seeking independence and using social media to urge change.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss historic flooding in south Asia and the corruption investigation into Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales.

Then, Suzette, talks with plant ecologist Lara Souza about climate change and fire on Brazil's savanna.

Cherokee Nation historian Catherine Gray discusses the Stand Watie monument at the Cherokee Nation Courthouse in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Catherine Gray walks up to a big, grey stone monument, standing tall under a lush magnolia tree on the grounds of the Cherokee Nation Courthouse in Tahlequah.

It’s monument to General Stand Watie, the last Confederate general to surrender at the end of the Civil War.

Businesses are surrounded by floodwaters from Harvey, in Humble, Texas.
David J. Phillip / AP

Oklahoma energy businesses who operate in Houston and the Texas and Louisiana coast have been affected by Hurricane Harvey’s massive flooding.

This week on The Business Intelligence Report, Journal Record senior reporter Sarah Terry-Cobo discusses the storm’s impact on Oklahoma's energy industry.

TRANSCRIPT

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss this week's elections in Angola and upcoming elections in Cambodia.

Then, Suzette talks with Katerina Tsetsura about the ongoing conflict in Ukraine and civil society engagement.

Ukrainian government army soldiers examine weapons captured from rebels in the city of Slovyansk, Donetsk Region, eastern Ukraine Saturday, July 5, 2014.
Dmitry Lovetsky / AP

Conflict and suffering continue in Ukraine as pro-Russian forces in eastern regions of the country continue to fight with Ukrainian soldiers. The violence dates back to 2014, when Russia annexed Crimea and supported separatists in eastern Ukraine. Despite the ongoing hostilities, a small group of activists is working to build civil society in the country.

Participants of the USA Softball All-American Games tournament perform warm-up exercises on the field at USA Softball Hall of Fame Stadium in Oklahoma City. The stadium is also home to the NCAA Women’s College World Series.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

The NCAA turned down Oklahoma City as a host for eleven tournaments that will occur between 2019 and 2022.

Among the events that Oklahoma City tried to attract were the Division I and Division II wrestling championships.

Tim L. Brassfield, the executive director of the Oklahoma City All Sports Association, said the city lost out on the wrestling tournament because the Chesapeake Arena was too small, among other factors.

Molly Fleming writes in the Journal Record:

World Views: August 18, 2017

Aug 21, 2017

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the 70th anniversary of the partition of India and Pakistan.

Then, Rebecca talks with photojournalist Randy Goodman about her exhibit of photographs, Iran: Women Only.

This 1983 photograph shows hundreds of Iranian women at prayer in Tehran, with female Revolutionary Guard members watching on.
Randy Goodman

In 1980, a colleague approached Randy Goodman with an opportunity: Would she like to travel to Iran as a photographer as part of a delegation?

Months earlier, Iranian university students stormed the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. The incident sparked the Iran Hostage Crisis, in which 52 American diplomats and citizens were taken hostage for 444 days. Goodman’s delegation would meet the people who were holding the hostages.

“How phenomenal an opportunity is that? And what experience for on-the-job training,” Goodman said.

First National Center in Oklahoma City
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City’s City Council agreed to invest $45 million in the vacant First National Center at Tuesday’s meeting.

Developers Gary Brooks and Charlie Nicholas purchased the building in January for $23 million. They plan to redevelop it as a mixed-use residential and commercial property, according to the Journal Record’s Brian Brus.

Jerry Drake Varnell
Facebook

An Oklahoma man was arrested Saturday morning in connection with an attempt to detonate what he believed was a vehicle bomb in Oklahoma City.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the alleged "acoustic attack" against U.S. diplomats in Cuba, as well as tensions between Poland and the European Union.

Then, Rebecca talks with Brazilian sociologist Biance Freire-Medeiros about favela tourism.

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