KGOU

Jacob McCleland

KGOU News Director

Jacob joined the KGOU News department in March 2015; previously he spent nine years as a reporter and host at public radio station KRCU in Cape Girardeau, Mo. His stories have appeared on NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered, Here & Now, Harvest Public Media and PRI’s The World. Jacob has reported on floods, disappearing languages, crop duster pilots, anvil shooters, Manuel Noriega, mule jumps and more.

He has a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and Spanish from Southeast Missouri State University and a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Illinois at Springfield.

Jacob warns us he won't answer the phone when the St. Louis Cardinals are playing a postseason game. Fun fact: his high school mascot is the Appleknocker.

Ways to Connect

Anthony Bourdain attends the Turner Network 2016 Upfronts at Nick & Stef's Steakhouse
Evan Agostini / Invision/AP

Both centers in Oklahoma that receive calls from the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline are seeing an increase in calls following last week’s deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain.

At HeartLine in Oklahoma City, crisis intervention director Megan Rollins says the number of calls more than doubled last week, as compared to the same week the year before. Last week, the center received 351 calls. During the same week in 2017, 168 calls came in.

Jim Collard, economic development director with the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, speaks during the International Inter-tribal Trade and Investment Organization Conference at the University of Oklahoma College of Law in Norman.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Before the formation of boundaries between the United States and Canada, indigenous tribes would trade freely with one another. An organization called the Inter-tribal Trade and Investment Organization, or ITTIO, is trying to restore those connections.

Attorney Jack Fite, representing Public Service Co. of Oklahoma, addresses the Oklahoma Corporation Commission.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Four companies have agreed to support a proposed $4.5 billion wind power project. The Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority, Oneta Power LLC, South Central MCN and Tri-County Electric Cooperative reached an agreement with Public Service Co, or PSO, who announced the Wind Catcher project last summer. Wind Catcher could provide up to 2 gigawatts of electricity and could potentially be the largest wind farm in the country.

A fence in a field near Hooker, Oklahoma on May 12, 2018.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Last month was the hottest May on record in Oklahoma. Preliminary data from the Mesonet indicates May finished with a statewide average of 74.6 degrees. That breaks the previous record of 74 degrees, which was set in May 1962.

National Weather Service

Marvin Haworth walks through a house frame that’s under construction in the Seiter Farms development in Moore, Oklahoma.

“You see these hurricane clips right there? You see one at every rafter in the house. They’re all tied to the wall, so that rafter cannot be pulled loose from the wall,” Haworth says as he points toward the connection between the frame’s walls and roof.

Mercy athletic trainer Zane Brugenhemke works on OKC Energy FC goalkeeper Cody Laurendi Tuesday in Edmond.
Emmy Verdin / Journal Record

Professional athletic trainers will be required to obtain at least a Master’s Degree in order to sit for the National Athletic Trainers Association exam. Sarah Terry-Cobo writes in the Journal Record that the new, more stringent requirements will go into place for an industry that is expanding beyond sports teams and into the world of the military and industrial workplaces.

FULL TRANSCRIPT

Architect Gary Armbruster of MA+ Architecture designed Canadian Valley Technology Center's new campus in El Reno.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Preschool students run tiny hands through a plastic tub of little blue beads that look like fish. They then scurry across the room to sing “The wheels on the bus” with their classmates.

It’s a bright, colorful, happy room here at the Canadian Valley Technical Center’s Child Development Center in El Reno, Oklahoma. And just a few steps down the hall, child care director Barbi Slimp opens the door to another room that’s just as cheerful.

Marvin Haworth stands outside a home his business is constructing in Moore, Oklahoma on May 14, 2018.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Marvin Haworth walks through a house frame that’s under construction in the Seiter Farms development in Moore, Oklahoma.

“You see these hurricane clips right there? You see one at every rafter in the house. They’re all tied to the wall, so that rafter cannot be pulled loose from the wall,” Haworth says as he points toward the connection between the frame’s walls and roof.

Students Faith Thomas, left, and A’Riyah Stepeny prepare bagels to give to students as part of a free breakfast program at Oklahoma Centennial Mid-High School in Oklahoma City Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Many students at Oklahoma Centennial Mid-High in northeast Oklahoma City often don’t eat breakfast. And when students are hungry, they don’t pay attention and their grades can suffer.

Devon Cuts $75M Deal With DowDupont

May 15, 2018
Devon Tower in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

A commodity hedge deal between Oklahoma City-based energy company Devon and  petrochemical/agriculture giant DowDupont could be a sign of a new trend.

The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry-Cobo writes the deal will provide “low-risk cash” to Devon, and DowDupont will receive natural gas that will be used to produce plastics, chemicals and other products.

The $75 million deal will last 5 years, according to the Journal Record.

Tudor Crossing Apartments at 1346 SW 74th St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Investors were putting money into multifamily housing complexes during the first quarter of 2018, but higher interest rates could slow future investment according to a report by the Journal Record’s Molly Fleming.

This week on the Business Intelligence Report, Fleming talks with KGOU about apartment investments, and a program at the University of Oklahoma School of Law that provides pro bono legal services to tenants who are facing eviction.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

The Oklahoma Legislature adjourned onThursday night, ending its yearly session three weeks before the constitutional deadline on May 25.  

After two special sessions left over from last year’s budget woes, a teacher protest that lasted almost two weeks and more than a year of struggling to find funds for state services, lawmakers passed a $7.6 billion dollar state budget in April, the largest in state history.  Here’s a few more of state lawmakers’ accomplishments this year.

 

Teacher Pay Raise:

National Weather Service

Severe weather is expected across much of western and central Oklahoma today, mainly in the afternoon, evening and overnight.

An American Eagle jet comes in for a landing in the background behind land at 9201 S. Portland Ave. in Oklahoma City, the site of a future Amazon.com fulfillment center.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

The Oklahoma City Airport Trust is in negotiations with Amazon to open a fulfillment center near the Will Rogers World Airport. The city is considering incentives to bring Amazon to Oklahoma City, but some city leaders are questioning whether incentives are necessary.

Workers at a site of a pipeline under construction along state Highway 75 north of Horntown.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Today on the Business Intelligence Report, Journal Record senior reporter Sarah Terry-Cobo talks discusses conservation credit programs that are designed to protect the American burying beetle. She also talks about the Choctaw Nation’s recycling efforts.

In this May 5, 1995 file photo, a large group of search and rescue crew attends a memorial service in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City.
Bill Waugh / AP Photo

Richard Williams just walked out of a meeting in the Murrah Federal Building on the morning of April 19, 1995. He was talking with a colleague when the blast went off. It’s the last thing he remembers.

“I was dug out by an Oklahoma City policeman, taken to the university hospital where they treated me with triage and subsequently follow-up surgeries and physical therapy and all those kind of things for years,” Williams said.

The Devon Energy Center in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Crude oil prices continue to rise, but Oklahoma’s oil and gas companies are not necessarily popping any corks. Sarah Terry-Cobo writes in the Journal Record that crude oil hit its highest levels in three-and-a-half years on Friday, but it is more difficult to drillers to make a profit, even though prices have been near or above $60 per barrel since January.

Trucks pass each other along a rural road just off south of Kingfisher.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

A bill that would change how Oklahoma oversees trucking is drawing conflict of interest questions because the legislation’s sponsor owns trucks as part of his business.

A customer enters a Citibank, Thursday, March 16, 2017 in New York.
Mark Lennihan / AP Photo

National banking giant Citibank announced on March 21 that it would require retail clients to no longer sell firearms to customers under the age of 21. The bank is also requiring clients to no longer sell bump stocks and high-capacity magazines. The bank also condemned gun violence and what the financial institution considers a lack of action by lawmakers.

The interior of the 23rd Street Armory building, 200 NE 23rd St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Two different entities turned in three bids to describe what they plan to do with the old armory building and surrounding properties in Oklahoma City.
 

The 72,000 square foot state-owned armory sits at NE 23rd Street and Walnut, just west of the Capitol building. The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming tells KGOU the armory was built in the 1930s and was used by the National Guard until 2010.

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