KGOU

Jim Johnson

KGOU Program Manager / Host of The Weekend Blues

Jim is a journalism/mass communications graduate from the University of Oklahoma. While still a student, he became the host of what is now The Weekend Blues. He currently serves as KGOU’s Program Director where he supervises all aspects of KGOU’s on-air programming output. 

Jim serves as Program Chair for Jazz in June, Norman’s annual Jazz and Blues festival. He also enjoys singing and playing in a Blues/Rock band (guitar) in various venues around the metro.

Ways to Connect

Oklahoma Watch is a nonprofit organization that produces in-depth and investigative journalism on important public-policy issues facing the state. More Oklahoma Watch content can be found at www.oklahomawatch.org
Oklahoma Watch

State Question 792 is among several ballot initiatives Oklahoma voters will decide in November. If approved, the measure would revise the laws governing alcoholic beverage sales in the state. In a recent Oklahoma Watch public forumState Sen.

Futurework: How Technology Will Redefine the Culture of Work
IEEE Spectrum Magazine

Technological advances have put us on the edge of a new industrial revolution. Robert Reich, former Secretary of Labor and Professor of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, and Susan Hassler, Editor-In-Chief of IEEE Spectrum Magazine, are joined by engineers, scientists, and futurists from MIT, Carnegie-Mellon, Rice Univ., and the Institute for the Future to give listeners insights into how technology will redefine work in the not too distant future.

Willis Alan Ramsey in concert
Jim Johnson / KGOU

Willis Alan Ramsey writes curious songs that fire up the imagination: from the love affair between a honeybee and chrysanthemum to the lonely travels of a tormented vagabond named Spider John. His storytelling is so compelling and vivid that fellow songwriters across genres consider him royalty. Captain and Tennille, Jerry Jeff Walker, Jimmy Buffett, Waylon Jennings, Widespread Panic, Shawn Colvin and Jimmie Dale Gilmore have all mined his material.

Lisa Miller descending Angel's Landing
Hearing Voices/NPR

The National Park Service turns 100 on August 25, 2016, and KGOU's 'Sunday Radio Matinee' commemorates the occasion by offering Hearing Voices: Walk In The Park

This encore broadcast from NPR's archives takes us from Walter Pierce community Park in Washington, D.C. to Utah's Zion National Park and several other national parks in between to explore the obvious and hidden beauty that lies in these special places.  

IQ2 U.S. "The President Has Usurped The Constitutional Power Of Congress"
Intelligence Squared U.S.

The Constitution provides that "All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States," and it goes on to grant Congress a robust-and fearsome-list of powers.

James Madison assumed that "in republican government, the legislative authority necessarily predominates," and he cautioned that the legislative department may tend to "draw all power into its impetuous vortex." But modern politics and law seem to tell a quite different story.

Image of the noted UT tower where Charles Whitman rained down bullets on his fellow students fifty years ago.
Miguel Gutierrez Jr. /KUT News

The Texas Standard oral history, “Out of the Blue: 50 Years After the UT Tower Shooting,” features selections from more than 100 exclusive, first-person accounts of the UT Tower shooting to paint a broad picture of the events that took place 50 years ago. Many of these eyewitness stories have not been shared publicly until now. 

America Abroad: Tibet

May 15, 2016
An exile Tibetan prays during an event to mark the 57th anniversary of the March 10, 1959, Tibetan Uprising Day, in Dharmsala, India, Thursday, March 10, 2016.
TSERING TOPGYAL/ ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Dalai Lama's 80th birthday has been a cause for celebration but also consternation for Tibetans at home and in the diaspora. Now, as he grows older, doubt hovers in the air as to who will carry on the struggle when he's gone.

Melyssa Rodiguez shares her story.
Jason Falchook/The Moth

This week's Sunday Radio Matinee feature is a special Mother's Day edition of The Moth Radio Hour. A mother helps her daughter get her first contact lenses, an unwanted parental intervention at a school concert, a new mother in Zambia awaits test results, a life or death bee sting and a teenage mother who couldn't be happier to welcome her child to the world. Join The Moth's Artistic Director Catherine Burns for an hour of stories by, for and about Mom! 

Oklahoma has one of the largest Native American populations in the United States. By using their right to govern themselves, some of Oklahoma’s tribes have become economic powerhouses, contributing hugely to the state economy. But some tribes are faring much better than others. Which tribes are doing well? Has the political influence of Native Americans – and the treatment of their culture – changed in line with growing economic success? And, are there valuable lessons to be learned from Oklahoma for indigenous peoples in the rest of the United States and around the world?

robot arm holding human skull
IQ2US/PRX

As technology rapidly progresses, some proponents of artificial intelligence believe that it will help solve complex social challenges and offer immortality via virtual humans. But AI’s critics say that we should proceed with caution, that any rewards may be overpromised, and the pursuit of 'super' intelligence and autonomous machines may result in unintended consequences.

Pages