Logan Layden

Broadcast Reporter for StateImpact Oklahoma

Logan Layden is a native of McAlester, Oklahoma. He graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 2009 and spent three years as a state capitol reporter and local host of All Things Considered for NPR member station KGOU in Norman.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
11:57 am
Wed April 16, 2014

Oklahoma's Largest Water Loan Goes To Norman To Fix Stressed, Stinky Treatment Plant

A water tower in Norman, Okla.
Credit MELISSA MEGGINSON / FLICKR

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board uses the state’s good credit to secure loans for communities and rural water districts that need help paying for expensive upgrades to their water systems.

And at its regular monthly meeting on Tuesday, the board approved a $50.3 million loan to Norman in what Joe Freeman, chief of OWRB’s financial assistance division, calls the “largest single loan request” it’s ever acted on.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
8:35 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Wind Power Projects Pick Up In Oklahoma, Despite Continued Tax Credit Uncertainty

Credit AMK713 / Flickr Creative Commons

A federal production tax credit on renewable energy production keeps expiring and getting renewed by Congress, creating a lot of uncertainty in the wind energy industry. Still, by the end of 2013, there were two new wind projects under construction in Oklahoma, and the national trend was toward wind.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
5:03 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Norman Mayor And Residents Question Use Of City Drinking Water For Fracking

Credit Tyler Ingram / Flickr Creative Commons

Many residents — and some members of the city council — didn’t know Norman’s drinking water is being used for hydraulic fracturing until The Journal Record broke the story in March about Texas-based driller Finley Resources tapping a fire hydrant near Franklin Road.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
12:26 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Cast-off State Parks Thrive Under Tribal Control, But Not Without Some Struggle

Rick Geisler, manager of Wah-Sha-She Park in Osage County, stands on the shore of Hula Lake.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

When budget cuts led the Oklahoma tourism department to find new homes for seven state parks in 2011, two of them went to Native American tribes. Both are open and doing well, but each has faced its own difficulties in the transition.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
10:57 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Some Parks Oklahoma Offloaded To Save Money Are Thriving Under Local Control

Mike Hancock has been the manager at Brushy Lake Park since 1980.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

In April 2011, Oklahoma was dealing with a half-billion dollar budget shortfall, and the state tourism department had just decided to offload seven of its parks to save money.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
1:24 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Bill to Allow New Tax On Limestone And Sand Mines Dead Until Next Year

State Rep. Charles McCall (R-Atoka)
Credit Provided / Oklahoma House of Representatives

Representative Charles McCall’s bill to allow counties to impose a tax on sand and limestone mining operations that sell their product elsewhere didn’t make it through the full House by the March 14 deadline.

But McCall, R-Atoka, says he will try again next year.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
2:40 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Federal Flood Insurance Fix Still Means Higher Premiums For Some Oklahomans

Credit Robert Pos / Flickr Creative Commons

Only about 18,000 of Oklahoma’s 3.8 million residents have flood insurance. And less than half of that many have policies that are subsidized by the federal government. But for those 7,000 or so Oklahomans, flood insurance is getting much more expensive.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
1:14 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

OKC Residents Living Off The Water Grid Owe Millions In Past Due Trash Bills

Credit oatsy40 / Flickr Creative Commons

In October 2013, StateImpact reported on the 14,000 or so mostly rural Oklahoma City residents who have their own water wells and aren’t connected to the city water system.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
9:34 am
Thu March 20, 2014

Worsening Drought Exposes Host Of Other Problems For Lake Texoma Residents

Lisa Davis (right), founder of the advocacy group Save Lake Texoma, near Rooster Creek Bridge at Lake Texoma State Park.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Listen to Logan Layden's story from the public meeting near Lake Texoma.

At the end of August 2013, Lake Texoma was full of water. But drought, and decisions by state and federal officials have meant a drop in levels. That’s a big problem for Kingston, Okla, a community that depends on lake tourism for its local economy.

The Rooster Creek Bridge has been landmark at Lake Texoma State Park since 1940. Yellow paint covers the metal truss structure that spans the creek as it opens into Oklahoma’s second largest lake.

When the lake’s this low, you can walk right under the bridge, past dusty mussel shells, and out to piles of rock slabs set up as fish habitats. And they’re hard to see, but Bob Jackman says there are elephants in this lake, too.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
10:32 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Federal Government Shutdown Cut Visitation At Oklahoma Park Sites By Half

Dick Duhn, owner of Arbuckle RV Resort, said business was down more than 50 percent during the government shutdown.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The U.S. government shutdown in October 2013 was the culmination of a national political fight over federal budgeting, but its effects were felt far from Washington, D.C., including at two federal park sites in Oklahoma.

Sulphur, Okla. relies heavily on the tourism revenue it gets as a result of being attached to the Chickasaw National Wildlife Refuge, which was shutdown for the first half of October along with the rest of the country’s national parks and wildlife refuges.

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