Logan Layden

Broadcast Reporter for StateImpact Oklahoma

Logan Layden is a native of McAlester, Oklahoma. He graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 2009 and spent three years as a state capitol reporter and local host of All Things Considered for NPR member station KGOU in Norman.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
10:45 am
Thu December 18, 2014

StateImpact’s Biggest Stories Of 2014 And A Preview Of Reporting In The Coming Year

Brothers and business partners Fred and Wayne Schmedt stand in their family's wheat field near Altus in southwest Oklahoma.
Joe Wertz StateImpact Oklahoma

StateImpact racked up thousands of miles traveling across the state this year, filing more than 40 radio stories and hundreds of web posts on how government energy, environmental and economic policy affects ordinary Oklahomans. And many of those stories involve issues that are ongoing.

EPA Regulations

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Weather and Climate
7:10 pm
Mon December 15, 2014

As Beef Industry Deals With Drought, Researchers Eye Less-Thirsty Cattle

Credit SoonerPA / Flickr Creative Commons

The ongoing drought in Oklahoma affects everyone in the country. Well, everyone who likes to eat beef, that is. Beef and veal prices will have risen by about 11.5 percent in 2014, and, as Reuters reports, “will increase significantly again in 2015″ because of drought in the Southern Plains.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
8:44 am
Thu December 11, 2014

State Water Regulator Works To Reclassify Risks Of Decades-Old Oklahoma Dams

Families and a fisherman along the spillway beneath Broken Bow Dam in southeastern Oklahoma.
Joe Wertz StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma has nearly 5,000 dams, more than most other states. When they were built, they were classified based on the risk their failure would pose to people and property.

But for many dams, it’s been decades since that risk was evaluated, and the potential hazard has changed because Oklahoma has changed. There are houses, roads and people where there weren’t before.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
7:22 am
Thu December 4, 2014

Environmentalists: Regional Haze Ruling In Texas Means Cleaner Air In Oklahoma

Oklahoma Gas & Electric's coal-fired Sooner Plant in Red Rock, Okla.
Joe Wertz StateImpact Oklahoma

On Nov. 24, the U.S.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
9:13 am
Thu November 20, 2014

EPA In The Crosshairs As Oklahoma’s Inhofe Gains Sway Over Climate Policy

U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) at an impromptu news conference during climate talks in Copenhagen in 2009.
Andrew Revkin Flickr

The Republican wave that put the party back in full control of Congress also put Oklahoma U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe back in charge of the Senate committee that oversees the country’s environmental policies.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
5:44 pm
Fri November 14, 2014

Oklahoma Outcry Continues Against EPA’s ‘Waters Of The United States’ Rule

Credit la vaca vegetariana / Flickr Creative Commons

Since the federal Clean Water Act first became law in 1972, there’s been confusion over which bodies of water qualify for protection under its provisions. Enter the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Waters of the U.S. rule, which means to bring clarity to the situation.

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Weather and Climate
7:12 pm
Mon November 10, 2014

Crumbling Infrastructure Causes Fluoride to Fade From Public Water Supplies

Testing water for fluoride.
Credit IndiaWaterPortal.org / Flickr Creative Commons

The anti-fluoride movement is gaining steam in the U.S. And with celebrities like Ed Begley Jr. and Rob Schneider on board, how could it fail? 

But the debate over whether fluoridation benefits communities’ dental health or amounts to the forced medication of the masses isn’t why Oklahoma towns like Lawton, Purcell, and Fairview stopped adding the chemical to their water.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
8:16 am
Thu November 6, 2014

Hunters Hopeful Wetter Summer Means More Wildlife In Oklahoma’s Woods

Jack Barrett, owner of the BDC Gun Room in Shawnee, Okla., shows off a new shotgun model popular with hunters.
Joe Wertz StateImpact Oklahoma

Nearly a quarter of a million hunters are set to grab their guns and stalk through Oklahoma’s woods when deer gun season opens the week before Thanksgiving, according to Micah Holmes with the state Department of Wildlife Conservation.

“There’s more deer hunters out in the woods on opening day of deer gun season than there is at Lewis Field, at the OU football stadium, and at the Tulsa football stadium combined,” Holmes says.

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Oklahoma News
6:23 pm
Mon October 27, 2014

Oklahoma’s New Normal: Water Forum Centers On Drought Adaptation

Robert Moore, general manager of the Marshall County Water Corporation, addresses a panel on local planning for future droughts at the 35th annual Oklahoma Governor's Water Conference in Oklahoma City Oct. 22.
Logan Layden StateImpact Oklahoma

Drought — and how to deal with it — was the central theme of the annual Oklahoma Governor’s Water Conference last week in Oklahoma City, where water experts and authorities discussed issues ranging from crop management to what Las Vegas can teach Oklahoma about water conservation.

Oklahoma Water Resources Board Executive Director J.D. Strong made the point again this year: The future looks like the past — hotter and drier — and no one should be surprised.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
10:41 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Oklahoma Drought Is The Central Theme Of 2014 Governor's Water Conference

U.S. Rep. Markwayne Mullin (R-Okla. 2) addresses attendees during the 2014 Governor's Water Conference while U.S. Rep. Frank Lucas (R-Okla. 3) and U.S. Rep. James Lankford (R-Okla. 5) look on.
Credit Congressman Markwayne Mullin / Facebook

The annual Governor’s Water Conference continues Thursday in downtown Oklahoma City.

Wednesday water experts and authorities discussed crop use and what Las Vegas could teach Oklahoma about resource management.

Oklahoma Water Resources Board Executive Director J.D. Strong says the state is learning to adapt to this new – and dry – normal.

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