Logan Layden

Broadcast Reporter for StateImpact Oklahoma

Logan Layden is a native of McAlester, Oklahoma. He graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 2009 and spent three years as a state capitol reporter and local host of All Things Considered for NPR member station KGOU in Norman.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
11:43 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Drought And Passive Landowners Add Fuel To Oklahoma’s Burning Red Cedar Problem

Billy Hays in the cab of a Bobcat, which Oklahoma County modified to cut and shred Eastern Red Cedars.
Joe Wertz StateImpact Oklahoma

The eastern red cedar tree causes allergies, crowds out other species, guzzles water, and fuels Oklahoma’s most devastating wildfires, including one near Guthrie last week.

And lengthy drought has intensified the problem. But eliminating the tree is complicated by the passive attitude of many landowners, and a state forestry service with little authority.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
11:03 am
Wed April 30, 2014

Supreme Court Rules On Coal Pollution, Dealing Blow To AG Pruitt And OG&E

Oklahoma Gas and Electric's Muskogee power plant.
Logan Layden StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt and Oklahoma Gas and Electric, the state’s largest utility, haven’t had much luck going up against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency lately.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
11:35 am
Thu April 24, 2014

What An Oklahoma Grazing Land Can Teach Us About Global Climate Change

University of Oklahoma Ph.D. student and research assistant Yuting Zhou installs a sensor in an experimental wheat field at the Grazinglands Research Lab in El Reno, Okla.
Joe Wertz StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma is known for its wild weather. And now, the state’s variable climate is helping scientists understand how climate change could affect farms everywhere.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
7:36 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Why Regulators Are ‘Scratching Their Heads’ Over Northeast Oklahoma Coal Mine

Credit Geoffrey Rhodes / Flickr Creative Commons

A new coal mining operation near Oologah Lake in northeast Oklahoma would disturb 11,000 feet of streambed and drain a pond in the Panther Creek watershed. But that’s not the problem.

The issue is over how to restore the damaged land after mining ends — and that depends on whose rules apply: the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality’s or the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
11:57 am
Wed April 16, 2014

Oklahoma's Largest Water Loan Goes To Norman To Fix Stressed, Stinky Treatment Plant

A water tower in Norman, Okla.
Credit Melissa Megginson / Flickr Creative Commons

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board uses the state’s good credit to secure loans for communities and rural water districts that need help paying for expensive upgrades to their water systems.

And at its regular monthly meeting on Tuesday, the board approved a $50.3 million loan to Norman in what Joe Freeman, chief of OWRB’s financial assistance division, calls the “largest single loan request” it’s ever acted on.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
8:35 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Wind Power Projects Pick Up In Oklahoma, Despite Continued Tax Credit Uncertainty

Credit AMK713 / Flickr Creative Commons

A federal production tax credit on renewable energy production keeps expiring and getting renewed by Congress, creating a lot of uncertainty in the wind energy industry. Still, by the end of 2013, there were two new wind projects under construction in Oklahoma, and the national trend was toward wind.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
5:03 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Norman Mayor And Residents Question Use Of City Drinking Water For Fracking

Credit Tyler Ingram / Flickr Creative Commons

Many residents — and some members of the city council — didn’t know Norman’s drinking water is being used for hydraulic fracturing until The Journal Record broke the story in March about Texas-based driller Finley Resources tapping a fire hydrant near Franklin Road.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
12:26 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Cast-off State Parks Thrive Under Tribal Control, But Not Without Some Struggle

Rick Geisler, manager of Wah-Sha-She Park in Osage County, stands on the shore of Hula Lake.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

When budget cuts led the Oklahoma tourism department to find new homes for seven state parks in 2011, two of them went to Native American tribes. Both are open and doing well, but each has faced its own difficulties in the transition.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
10:57 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Some Parks Oklahoma Offloaded To Save Money Are Thriving Under Local Control

Mike Hancock has been the manager at Brushy Lake Park since 1980.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

In April 2011, Oklahoma was dealing with a half-billion dollar budget shortfall, and the state tourism department had just decided to offload seven of its parks to save money.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
1:24 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Bill to Allow New Tax On Limestone And Sand Mines Dead Until Next Year

State Rep. Charles McCall (R-Atoka)
Credit Provided / Oklahoma House of Representatives

Representative Charles McCall’s bill to allow counties to impose a tax on sand and limestone mining operations that sell their product elsewhere didn’t make it through the full House by the March 14 deadline.

But McCall, R-Atoka, says he will try again next year.

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