KGOU

District Court Judge Wants State, Tribe To Settle Online Gaming Dispute

Apr 7, 2016

Credit The Journal Record

The Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma is a step closer to launching its internet gambling site.

Tribal representatives met with a judge Tuesday as part of their efforts to open PokerTribe.com, The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming reports:

U.S. District Court Judge David Russell asked the parties to prepare and submit an agreed order by April 15. At that time, a decision could be made, or Russell could ask for more information.

“The use of the Internet is merely using technology to play covered games as a way to increase tribal revenues,” [Arbitrator Charles] Chapel wrote. “It does not extend or restrict the scope of the games and does not amend the compact in any way. The compact and all its terms shall remain in force.”

In a response last month, the state said that there was no genuine dispute that would preclude summary judgment in favor of the tribe.

Two other tribes have tried online gambling in recent years, Fleming writes:

In the 2000s, the Coeur d’Alene Tribe in Idaho tried to operate online gambling, but then-National Indian Gaming Commission Counsel Kevin Washburn issued a statement that it would constitute off-reservation gambling. Chapel stated in his arbitrator’s ruling that gambling is conducted where the computer server controlling the game is located.

Therefore, the tribe could have an online gambling operation.

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