All Things Considered on KGOU

Mon-Thur 4-7pm and Fri 4:30-6:30pm
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish

All Things Considered brings listeners the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. The program has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Local updates from Susan Shannon
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Composer ID: 
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Movie Reviews
3:43 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Seeing The New 'X-Men'? Take Along A Teenager To Explain

Professor Xavier and Magneto scheme to send Wolverine back to the Nixon-era past to avert a devastating war in X-Men: Days of Future Past.
Alan Markfield/Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 5:36 pm

The final "X" in the 20th Century Fox logo glows for an extra second as X-Men: Days of Future Past gets started, but what follows is darker than dark — a bleak, dire future in which all of Manhattan is a mutant prison camp.

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NPR Story
3:19 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Why Some Books You're Looking To Buy On Amazon Aren't There

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 5:04 pm

Amazon is making it harder for customers to get books published by Hachette and its imprints. Amazon wants deeper discounts on the publisher's books; Hachette is balking. So if you go to the online retailer looking for, say, the new J.K. Rowling mystery, Amazon tells you the hardcover is currently unavailable.

NPR Story
3:19 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Conor Oberst Releases Intimate New Solo Album

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 5:04 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Since he first began attracting attention with the band Bright Eyes in 1998, Conor Oberst has been busy. He's founded two record labels, started several bands and recorded a prolific amount of songs. The Nebraska singer largely avoided releasing albums under his own name, but this week brings a new solo album. It's called "Upside Down Mountain." Reviewer Tom Moon says it's his most intimate and engaging work in years.

TOM MOON, BYLINE: It's a special talent, sounding like damaged goods on demand.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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NPR Story
3:19 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Soccer Star Landon Donovan Didn't Make The World Cup Cut

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 5:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The United States is not soccer-mad but it does have some pretty dedicated fans. And they are up in arms over news about the guy behind the most famous goal in U.S. soccer history.

(SOUNDBITE OF SOCCER GAME)

ANNOUNCER: Landon Donovan (unintelligible) for the USA. Can they do it here? Of course (unintelligible) and Donovan has scored. Oh, can you believe this. Go, go USA.

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Health
5:00 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Think Work Is Stressful? For Many, It's More Relaxing Than Home

Work can be rough, but a researcher has found that for many people, being at home is more stressful than being at the office.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 6:10 pm

Many Americans say their jobs are stressful — we complain of too much to do in too little time, demanding bosses or difficult colleagues. But researcher Sarah Damaske wanted to know, objectively, is being at work any harder than being at home?

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All Tech Considered
4:42 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Can Cop-Worn Cameras Restore Faith In New Orleans Police?

Lt. Travis St. Pierre, of the New Orleans Police Department, shows off a body-worn camera during a press conference in January.
Brett Duke The Times-Picayune/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 1:23 pm

Body-worn video cameras are quickly becoming standard-issue for American police, especially at departments in the process of reform. And in New Orleans, the troubled police department is now requiring almost all officers to wear the cameras.

The city's police department has a dark history of corruption, racism and brutality. The low point may have been the Danziger Bridge episode, after Hurricane Katrina, when police shot unarmed people, then covered up the crime.

These days, the department is trying to rebuild the public's trust — which is where the body cameras come in.

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Photography And Memory
4:18 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Overexposed? Camera Phones Could Be Washing Out Our Memories

Rebecca Woolf takes a lot of photos of her children for her blog, Girl's Gone Child, but says she tries to not let the camera get in the middle of a moment.
Courtesy of Rebecca Woolf

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 11:58 am

Los Angeles blogger Rebecca Woolf uses her blog, Girl's Gone Child, as a window into her family's life. Naturally, it includes oodles of pictures of her four children.

She says she's probably taken tens of thousands of photos since her oldest child was born. And she remembers the moment when it suddenly clicked — if you will — that she was too absorbed in digital documentation.

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Asia
3:54 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Violence Rises In Western Chinese Province

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 5:46 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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From Our Listeners
3:54 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Letters: NPR's special series

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 5:46 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Time now for your letters and this correction. This week, the Supreme Court ruled on a case involving the 1980 boxing film, "Raging Bull." It stars Robert De Niro as champion boxer Jake LaMotta.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "RAGING BULL")

ROBERT DE NIRO: (as Jake LaMotta) Harder. Harder.

JOE PESCI: (as Joey) Aww, come on. You want to stop now? That's enough of that.

NIRO: (as Jake LaMotta) Harder.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Found Recipes
3:54 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Freed From The Sidewalk Cart, This Sauerkraut Goes Global

Don't diss the sauerkraut: It may be a hot dog staple, but it's more versatile than you think.
Courtesy of Edward Lee

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 7:21 pm

Edward Lee thought he knew sauerkraut. The chef for the Louisville, Ky., restaurant 610 Magnolia, grew up in New York City, a place where sauerkraut means one thing: "sidewalk hot dog carts — cheap, bad, overboiled sauerkraut on top of awful kosher hot dogs," he says.

He loved it, as any native New Yorker might, but it was sauerkraut -- boring, safe, standard.

Many years later, after Lee moved to Kentucky, he had a sauerkraut surprise at his then-fiance's house. When she broke out a jar of her mother's homemade sauerkraut, he didn't expect too much.

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