All Things Considered on KGOU

Mon-Thur 4-7pm and Fri 4:30-6:30pm
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish

All Things Considered brings listeners the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. The program has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Local updates from Susan Shannon
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Economy
3:38 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

For Geithner, Financial Crisis Was Like Landing A Burning Plane

Then-Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies before the House Financial Services Committee in 2012. He says he struggled with communicating why he had to help the banks during the financial crisis.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 7:27 pm

Timothy Geithner was president of the New York Federal Reserve when the Wall Street bank Lehman Brothers collapsed in 2008. A few months later, he became Treasury secretary as the crisis deepened on his watch.

Geithner received mixed reviews of his performance during that time. Wall Street types take him for a champion of excessive government intervention and regulation, while Occupy Wall Street types consider him a tool of the banks. Geithner, however, says he was just trying to get the financial system out of a multifaceted crisis with the threat of a Great Depression looming.

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Around the Nation
6:10 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Veterans' Success At Home: More Than Just Landing Any Job

Veterans leave the service with high-level skills, like combat medicine, but it's often not easy to turn those skills into credentials for a civilian job.
Brennan Linsley AP

The federal government has spent billions helping veterans get the training and education they need to re-enter the civilian workforce.

Despite the effort, the unemployment rate for vets remains higher than the national average. Aside from dealing with the psychological transition, veterans also have to navigate how to transfer their military skills into civilian ones.

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Europe
4:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Eastern Ukraine Muddles Through Voting On Referendums

Separatists in the eastern Ukraine regions of Donetsk and Luhansk asked voters to take part in an unauthorized referendum Sunday on whether to make their region independent.

Television
4:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

'Stand Up Planet' Follows Jokes To Serious Global Issues

As part of the documentary Stand Up Planet, South African comedian Mpho Popps (left) and Indian comedian Aditi Mittal (right) came to Los Angeles to perform with Hasan Minhaj at the Laugh Factory.
Courtesy of StandUpPlanet.org

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 8:45 am

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Around the Nation
4:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Despite Objections, Maine Governor Acts On Food Stamp Fraud

Gov. Paul LePage is using his executive power to push through new photo ID requirements on on Electronic Benefit Transfer cards.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

To combat welfare and food stamp fraud, states across the nation are considering various steps, including requiring photos on Electronic Benefit Transfer cards. Massachusetts and New York are the only states with photo ID programs right now, but they'll soon be joined by Maine, whose Republican governor is using his executive authority to avoid a political battle and start a similar program.

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Music
4:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

In The Studio With Rodrigo Y Gabriela

Rodrigo Y Gabriela's latest album is 9 Dead Alive.
Tina Korhonen Courtesy of the artist

A pair of former heavy metal guitarists who left Mexico for Ireland, Rodrigo y Gabriela developed an acoustic sound that has taken the duo from playing on the streets for change to some of the biggest stages on the festival circuit. Rodrigo Sanchez and Gabriela Quintero joined NPR's Arun Rath in the studio at NPR West to perform a few selections from their latest album, 9 Dead Alive. Hear the music, and their conversation, at the audio link.

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Sports
5:40 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Athletes Chased By Technology In The Sport Of Anti-Doping

Lance Armstrong (left) and Tyler Hamilton compete in the 90th Tour de France in 2003. Hamilton later testified in the doping case brought against Armstrong and the U.S. Postal cycling team.
Franck Fife AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 6:59 pm

As the Giro d'Italia bicycle race sets off in Ireland this weekend, the shadow of doping will not be far behind. In a competition to beat the cheaters, scientists are constantly trying to improve drug testing.

While it can be hard for regulators to keep up with new habits, when an athlete is finally caught doping, the result can be revolutionary.

Performance-enhancing drugs have plagued the sport of cycling for years, with Lance Armstrong at the center of the scandal. But he was not alone.

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Asia
4:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Conflicts Over Resources With China's Neighbors Have Deeper Motives

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 5:33 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Middle East
4:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

The View From Homs: Watching The Withdrawal Of Syria's Rebels

On Friday, the Syrian government evacuated the last of the rebel fighters from Homs, following a cease-fire agreement. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Nabih Bulos, a special correspondent for the Los Angeles Times.

History
4:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Descendants Of Chinese Laborers Reclaim Railroad's History

A group of Asian-Americans, including descendants of Chinese railroad workers, recreated an iconic photo on the 145th anniversary of the first transcontinental railroad's completion at Promontory Summit, Utah.
Courtesy of Corky Lee

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 8:55 pm

East finally met West 145 years ago on America's first transcontinental railroad.

The symbolic hammering of a golden spike at Promontory Summit, Utah, completed the connection between the country's two coasts and shortened a cross-country trip of more than six months down to a week.

Much of the building was done by thousands of laborers brought in from China, but their faces were left out of photographs taken on that momentous day.

Over the years, one photograph in particular from May 10, 1869, has taken root in U.S. history.

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