KGOU

KGOU Sunday Radio Matinee

Sundays 12 - 1 p.m.

Public radio has many great programs that produce just a few episodes a year: Intelligence Squared U.S., America Abroad, and KGOU's student-produced show Assignment: Radio. This is where you'll find these and other limited-run programs.

Coming Up: 

APM Reports is a new brand from American Public Media, combining the work of American Radio Works and a new investigative team into one national news unit.
Credit American Public Media

Sunday, January 22, 2017 @ Noon

In The Dark: Episode 3 of 5 ~ "The One Who Got Away"

In the Dark examines how law enforcement handled the kidnapping of Jacob Wetterling – a case that went unsolved for nearly 27 years, but had sweeping national consequences. From the creation of the federal sex offender registry, to the devastating effects of publicly labeling a man a "person of interest," this 5-part series offers insights into how crimes are – or are not - solved in their communities. 

Episode #3, "The One Who Got Away"  presents the story of Jared Scheierl, who was abducted by the same man who killed Jacob just a few months before Jacob disappeared. It tells how Jared learned that other boys in the town of Paynesville had been grabbed and molested by a man who sounded similar, and how he and those boys came together as adults to try to track that man down. Afterward, Madeleine, Samara and Lizzie discuss Jared's doubts about some details of Danny Heinrich's confession, and explore whether Heinrich continued to attack children in the years he was free.

This program contains material that some listeners may find disturbing 

Past Sunday Radio Matinee Features: 

Capitol Steps
Capitol Steps

"If only the Capitol Steps had some funny material to work with in 2016" is something that will never cross your mind when listening to their Year In Review New Year's special. All your election favorites will be there: President Elect Trump, Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, Vladimir Putin...wait, what?!? Let's not let the election divide us any further. Listen and unite in laughter! And for goodness's sake, can someone give Merrick Garland a hug?

Tinsel Tales 3: NPR Christmas Stories

Dec 25, 2016

In keeping with a well-loved NPR holiday tradition, Lynn Neary hosts a collection of extraordinary Christmas stories that will transport you to unexpected places.

John Donvan, host of Intelligence Squared U.S.
Intelligence Squared U.S.

It is alleged that the practice of gerrymandering - dividing election districts into units to favor a particular group - subverts democracy by making congressional districts “safe” for one party or the other. As a result, only those voting in primaries are in effect choosing our representatives.  Are primary voters more extreme in their views, and therefore pulling democrats to the left and republicans to the right?

When young adults set out to pick a college back in 2010 and 2011, they were making a decision of a lifetime amid big financial obstacles: soaring tuition and the great recession.

And as they progressed through their college careers, a debate over the value of college grew louder.

A long held mantra – that the best investment is a good education – is increasingly being called into question. Some politicians, high-profile entrepreneurs and even educators, have become publicly skeptical of the worth of a degree that costs hundreds of thousands of dollars to obtain.

IQ2 U.S. - Should We Give Undocumented Immigrants A Path To Citizenship?
IQ2 U.S.

There are an estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States, and the question of what to do with them has sparked years of fierce debate, but no significant action.  

In 2013, the bipartisan “Gang of Eight” managed to pass a comprehensive immigration reform bill in the Senate, only to get it dropped by the House.  And in 2016, a deadlocked Supreme Court decision stalled President Obama’s executive actions, DACA and DAPA, which were designed to prevent the deportation of some 5 million people.  

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Nov 27, 2016
American Public Media

Two days after Nora McInerny's husband Aaron died, she celebrated Thanksgiving with her family. Well...maybe not "celebrated". Actually, why would you do that? Try to be normal when clearly everything isn't? But every year, millions of people do the same thing during the holidays. This new special, Terrible, Thanks For Asking will feature conversations with Lucy Kalinithi and Amber Tozer, and some of the women of the Hot Young Widows Club on the challenges of dealing with trauma and loss during this sensitive season.

Susan Sarandon at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival
Josh Jensen / Flickr

What are you grateful for? It's a more important question than you might think.

Showing and feeling grateful may be the true key to health and happiness.

Some of Delta 187 Rakassans
Adam Piore / Transom.org

All wars are the same, it is said; only the scenery changes. And the repercussions are pretty much the same too.

Sarah Vap and her parents, Dave and Barbara Jacques on their farm and ranch in Osage County. The Jacques family strongly supports a 'yes' vote on State Question 777.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

When Oklahoma voters go to the polls next week, they’ll decide on State Question 777, known by supporters as the right-to-farm amendment. The measure would make farming and ranching a constitutional right and make it harder for the Legislature to enact laws that further regulate the agriculture industry.

The ballot question seems simple on the surface: Do you support the right to farm? The answer for many Oklahomans, however, is more complex. Environmental and legal considerations complicate the issue, and it has become very culturally and politically polarizing.

Greg Mashburn, Oklahoma District 21 District Attorney (left), and Kris Steele, Executive Director of The Education and Employment Ministry (right), debate State Questions 780 & 781 during an October 18, 2016 Oklahoma Watch-Out forum in Oklahoma City.
Oklahoma Watch

State Questions 780 and 781 propose making significant changes to Oklahoma’s criminal justice system in an effort to lower the state’s incarceration rates. SQ 780 proposes to change the classification of certain drug possession and property crimes from felony to misdemeanor offenses. SQ 781 would create the County Community Safety Investment Fund to hold and redistribute any savings achieved by incarcerating fewer people for drug possession or nonviolent crimes — the intent of

Intelligence Squared U.S. "Blame Big Pharma" debate poster
IQ2 US

Health care costs in the U.S. are some 18 percent of GNP, nearly double what other rich countries spend. We read of drug therapies that cost $100,000 a year or more, and of drug price increases that are six times the rate of inflation, on average, and often much more when mergers reduce competition in the industry. Is this a major driver of excessive health care costs? Or is it a by-product of the huge costs of getting new drugs approved? Has big pharma delivered drugs that reduce the need for costly surgeries, which extend life and improve its quality?

Ken Rudin/PRX

In 1960, the first televised presidential debates were held between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon, giving voters a unique opportunity to see the two candidates up close. Since 1976, all the major party nominees for president have participated in televised debates. The issues ranged from domestic concerns to foreign policy. But these debates are also remembered to many dramatic moments and memorable gaffes that have often helped decide the outcome of the elections.

State Question 779 is among the more hotly debated initiatives on the November 8 Oklahoma ballot.  The 'vote-yes' campaign is championed by University of Oklahoma President and former U.S. Sen. David Boren. Many educators have joined Boren in support of the proposal, citing low teacher pay and difficulty in attracting educators to the state. 

House Majority Leader Carl Albert (D-Okla.) sits in the Oval Office with President Lyndon Johnson.
Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library

Editor's Note: This program originally aired June 29, 2015.

Southeast Oklahoma is an unusual place, politically. Many southerners settled in the area after the Civil War, leading to its nickname “Little Dixie.”

Through the 20th century, it became the center of political power in Oklahoma, and the Democratic Party dominated politics well into the late 1990s. Decades after the formerly “Solid South” had switched to the Republican Party, Democrats enjoyed an 8:1 voter registration advantage in southeast Oklahoma.

IQ2 U.S. "The EPA Has Gone Too Far" debate graphic
Intelligence Squared U.S. / Intelligence Squared U.S.

Reducing carbon emissions is clearly good for the environment but often imposes substantial costs.  The costs are most obvious when coal companies go bankrupt, but can affect everyone indirectly through higher energy costs, slower economic growth, reduced employment, and lower business profits.   Has the Environmental Protection Agency considered the costs and benefits of its regulatory mandates fairly and appropriately?

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