KGOU

KGOU Sunday Radio Matinee

Sundays 12 - 1 p.m.

Public radio has many great programs that produce just a few episodes a year: Intelligence Squared U.S., America Abroad, and KGOU's student-produced show Assignment: Radio. This is where you'll find these and other limited-run programs.

Coming Up: 

College students speak to NPR's Robert Siegel for the news special, 'College Choice: The Value Of It All.'
Credit Elissa Nadworny / NPR

Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016 at noon

Sunday Radio Matinee

College Choice: The Value of It All (An NPR News Special) 

When young adults set out to pick a college back in 2010 and 2011, they were making a decision of a lifetime amid big financial obstacles: soaring tuition and the great recession.

And as they progressed through their college careers, a debate over the value of college grew louder.

A long held mantra – that the best investment is a good education – is increasingly being called into question. Some politicians, high-profile entrepreneurs and even educators, have become publicly skeptical of the worth of a degree that costs hundreds of thousands of dollars to obtain.

In that context, NPR's Robert Siegel set out to learn how nine bright and engaging college students feel now about the choices they made back then.

How have they handled the financial burden? And how well positioned do they feel for the future? Robert spent a year visiting with people who made a variety of decisions – attending a big state university, private college and community college.

 

Past Sunday Radio Matinee features: 

IQ2 U.S. - Should We Give Undocumented Immigrants A Path To Citizenship?
IQ2 U.S.

There are an estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States, and the question of what to do with them has sparked years of fierce debate, but no significant action. In 2013, the bipartisan “Gang of Eight” managed to pass a comprehensive immigration reform bill in the Senate, only to get it dropped by the House. And in 2016, a deadlocked Supreme Court decision stalled President Obama’s executive actions, DACA and DAPA , which were designed to prevent the deportation of some...

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Nov 27, 2016
American Public Media

Two days after Nora McInerny's husband Aaron died, she celebrated Thanksgiving with her family. Well...maybe not "celebrated". Actually, why would you do that? Try to be normal when clearly everything isn't? But every year, millions of people do the same thing during the holidays. This new special, Terrible, Thanks For Asking will feature conversations with Lucy Kalinithi and Amber Tozer, and some of the women of the Hot Young Widows Club on the challenges of dealing with trauma and loss...

Susan Sarandon at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival
Josh Jensen / Flickr

What are you grateful for? It's a more important question than you might think. Showing and feeling grateful may be the true key to health and happiness. The Science of Gratitude , is a one-hour documentary focusing on the latest information regarding the power (or lack of it) of being thankful. We hear research, expert opinion, and individual stories to illustrate how gratitude often has a large impact on overall happiness. The program covers gratitude in the workplace, in relationships, in...

Some of Delta 187 Rakassans
Adam Piore / Transom.org

All wars are the same, it is said; only the scenery changes. And the repercussions are pretty much the same too. At Fort Campbell before deployment, Delta Company was a ragtag bunch, the “leftovers” as one of their fellow soldiers put it, but on the night of March 18th, 1968, they became heroes. Their leader received the Medal of Honor and two others were awarded the nation’s second highest honor, the Distinguished Service Cross, for their valor that night when the company endured a long and...

Sarah Vap and her parents, Dave and Barbara Jacques on their farm and ranch in Osage County. The Jacques family strongly supports a 'yes' vote on State Question 777.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

When Oklahoma voters go to the polls next week, they’ll decide on State Question 777, known by supporters as the right-to-farm amendment. The measure would make farming and ranching a constitutional right and make it harder for the Legislature to enact laws that further regulate the agriculture industry. The ballot question seems simple on the surface: Do you support the right to farm? The answer for many Oklahomans, however, is more complex. Environmental and legal considerations complicate...

Greg Mashburn, Oklahoma District 21 District Attorney (left), and Kris Steele, Executive Director of The Education and Employment Ministry (right), debate State Questions 780 & 781 during an October 18, 2016 Oklahoma Watch-Out forum in Oklahoma City.
Oklahoma Watch

State Questions 780 and 781 propose making significant changes to Oklahoma’s criminal justice system in an effort to lower the state’s incarceration rates. SQ 780 proposes to change the classification of certain drug possession and property crimes from felony to misdemeanor offenses. SQ 781 would create the County Community Safety Investment Fund to hold and redistribute any savings achieved by incarcerating fewer people for drug possession or nonviolent crimes — the intent of SQ 780 - to...

Intelligence Squared U.S. "Blame Big Pharma" debate poster
IQ2 US

Health care costs in the U.S. are some 18 percent of GNP, nearly double what other rich countries spend. We read of drug therapies that cost $100,000 a year or more, and of drug price increases that are six times the rate of inflation, on average, and often much more when mergers reduce competition in the industry. Is this a major driver of excessive health care costs? Or is it a by-product of the huge costs of getting new drugs approved? Has big pharma delivered drugs that reduce the need...

Ken Rudin/PRX

In 1960, the first televised presidential debates were held between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon, giving voters a unique opportunity to see the two candidates up close. Since 1976, all the major party nominees for president have participated in televised debates. The issues ranged from domestic concerns to foreign policy. But these debates are also remembered to many dramatic moments and memorable gaffes that have often helped decide the outcome of the elections. Join Political Junkie...

State Question 779 is among the more hotly debated initiatives on the November 8 Oklahoma ballot. The 'vote-yes' campaign is championed by University of Oklahoma President and former U.S. Sen. David Boren. Many educators have joined Boren in support of the proposal, citing low teacher pay and difficulty in attracting educators to the state. Opponents include many city officials and leaders who fear increasing the state’s sales tax to what would amount to the highest average sales tax rate in...

House Majority Leader Carl Albert (D-Okla.) sits in the Oval Office with President Lyndon Johnson.
Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library

Editor's Note: This program originally aired June 29, 2015. Southeast Oklahoma is an unusual place, politically. Many southerners settled in the area after the Civil War, leading to its nickname “Little Dixie.” Through the 20 th century, it became the center of political power in Oklahoma, and the Democratic Party dominated politics well into the late 1990s. Decades after the formerly “Solid South” had switched to the Republican Party, Democrats enjoyed an 8:1 voter registration advantage in...

IQ2 U.S. "The EPA Has Gone Too Far" debate graphic
Intelligence Squared U.S. / Intelligence Squared U.S.

Reducing carbon emissions is clearly good for the environment but often imposes substantial costs. The costs are most obvious when coal companies go bankrupt, but can affect everyone indirectly through higher energy costs, slower economic growth, reduced employment, and lower business profits. Has the Environmental Protection Agency considered the costs and benefits of its regulatory mandates fairly and appropriately? Is its Clean Power Plan a bold initiative to reduce carbon pollution at...

State Question 792 is among several ballot initiatives Oklahoma voters will decide in November. I f approved, the measure would revise the laws governing alcoholic beverage sales in the state. In a recent Oklahoma Watch public forum , State Sen. Stephanie Bice and Retail Liquor Association of Oklahoma President Bryan Kerr debated the merits of the proposal. Oklahoma Watch Executive Editor David Fritze moderated the August 23rd, 2016 public forum which serves as this week's Sunday Radio...

The 2016 presidential campaign has in many ways become a question of character. Even though Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump both have incredibly loyal supporters, the two candidates also inspire some intensely negative feelings among voters. Clinton and Trump are the two most unpopular candidates since modern polling began. NPR's Rachel Martin hosts an hour-long special that digs into key moments over the decades that helped cement their reputations and looks at character traits that have...

Futurework: How Technology Will Redefine the Culture of Work
IEEE Spectrum Magazine

Technological advances have put us on the edge of a new industrial revolution. Robert Reich, former Secretary of Labor and Professor of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, and Susan Hassler, Editor-In-Chief of IEEE Spectrum Magazine, are joined by engineers, scientists, and futurists from MIT, Carnegie-Mellon, Rice Univ., and the Institute for the Future to give listeners insights into how technology will redefine work in the not too distant future. Futurework: How Technology Will Redefine the...

Lisa Miller descending Angel's Landing
Hearing Voices/NPR

The National Park Service turns 100 on August 25, 2016, and KGOU's 'Sunday Radio Matinee' commemorates the occasion by offering Hearing Voices: Walk In The Park . This encore broadcast from NPR's archives takes us from Walter Pierce community Park in Washington, D.C. to Utah's Zion National Park and several other national parks in between to explore the obvious and hidden beauty that lies in these special places.

Pages