KGOU

KGOU Sunday Radio Matinee

Sundays 12 - 1 p.m.

Public radio has many excellent limited-run programs that are regularly featured in this 'variety' hour: Intelligence Squared U.S., America Abroad, Invisibilia, etc. The Sunday Radio Matinee also plays host to KGOU's own documentary productions and various other special content offerings. 

Law enforcement officers search Japanese immigrants that have been taken into custody.
Credit APM Reports / American Public Media

KGOU Sunday Radio Matinee

Sunday, July 15th @ Noon

Order 9066: Japanese American Incarceration in WWII  (Pt. 1) 

On February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, just months after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. Some 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry were forced from their homes on the West Coast and sent to one of ten "relocation" camps, where they were imprisoned behind barbed wire for the length of the war. Two-thirds of them were American citizens.

 

Order 9066 is a 3-part documentary that chronicles the history of this incarceration through vivid, first-person accounts of those who lived through it. With archival audio, historical context, and deeply personal narratives, the series offers audiences a nuanced and memorable account of how this shocking violation of American democracy came to pass, and its legacy in the present.

 

Episode #1 introduces us to the atmosphere on the West Coast leading up to Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, and its impact on Japanese Americans. This episode describes the FBI roundups of Japanese American community leaders and President Franklin D. Roosevelt's issuing of Order 9066, which led to the incarceration of 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry – most of them US citizens. 

 * Episodes 2 & 3 will air on July 22 & 29, respectively. 

Past Sunday Radio Matinee Features: 

 

The year 1968 will long be remembered for its political and social upheaval. As Americans reeled from the assassinations of two prominent leaders and sentiment deepened against the Vietnam War, politicians from both parties struggled to respond to aggravated constituents and build consensus.  

KGOU

In this hour-long special, KGOU’s Dick Pryor speaks with David Boren, who retired as president of the University of Oklahoma on June 30, 2018 after serving in the position for over two decades.

The year 1968 will long be remembered for its political and social upheaval. As Americans reeled from the assassinations of two prominent leaders and sentiment deepened against the Vietnam War, politicians from both parties struggled to respond to aggravated constituents and build consensus.  

The year 1968 will long be remembered for its political and social upheaval. As Americans reeled from the assassinations of two prominent leaders and sentiment deepened against the Vietnam War, politicians from both parties struggled to respond to aggravated constituents and build consensus.  

Intelligence Squared U.S.

Around the world, technology is disrupting the workforce, with automation poised to displace humans in the fields of medicine, agriculture, and beyond. Will the rise of robots fuel a new wave of “us versus them” populism capable of undermining democracy? 

Hearing Voices: For The Fallen

May 28, 2018
Troops salute a grave in a cemetery marked with crosses
NPR / Hearing Voices

Green Beret and poet, Colonel Robert Schaefer, US Army, hosts this 'Hearing Voices' Memorial Day special featuring the voices of veterans remembering their comrades: We talk with troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, reading their emails, poems, and journals, as part of the NEA project: “Operation Homecoming: Writing the Wartime Experience.” We hear interviews from StoryCorps, an essay from This I Believe, and the sounds of a Military Honor Guard, recorded by Charles Lane.

KGOU offers an hour-long public forum and debate over State Question 788. 

 Presented by Oklahoma Watch, the May 16th forum features Dr. Jean Hausheer, president of the Oklahoma State Medical Associtation; Frank Grove, chairman of Vote Yes on 788 and president of the Drug Policy Reform Network of Oklahoma; and Rep. John Paul Jordan.    

FOI Oklahoma

Freedom Of Information Oklahoma, a non-profit organization formed to promote openness in government, held a 2-hour 2018 gubernatorial candidate debate April 28, 2018. The event took place on the University of Central Oklahoma campus and was presented in partnership with UCentral Media and UCO Mass Communication Department. 

IQ2 "Is Belief In God Obsolete?"
Intelligence Squared U.S. / IQ2US

Does God have a place in 21st century human affairs? For many, the answer is an unapologetic yes. Belief in a higher power, they argue, is the foundation of human consciousness and the soul of all social, political, and scientific progress. 

Further, some claim, humans are biologically predisposed to embrace religion and require faith to live moral lives. 

Others are far more skeptical. For them, adherence to faith and religious tradition serves only to fracture communities and prevent humanity from embracing a more enlightened, reasoned, and just social order. 

The Boren Legacy

Apr 22, 2018
University of Oklahoma Video and Media Services

Join KGOU Sunday, April 22nd at noon for "The Boren Legacy", an intimate conversation with outgoing University of Oklahoma President David L. Boren and First Lady Molly Shi Boren on the influence and impact of their leadership during their tenure at OU.  "The Boren Legacy" is a production of OU's Video & Media Services

Civil rights activist and educator, Dr. George Henderson shares his experience in the struggle for racial equality during a November 3, 2011 broadcast of OETA's "A Conversation With..."
OETA

This week's Sunday Radio Matinee feature concludes our commemoration of Black History Month as we present "A Conversation With... George Henderson" (an OETA production featuring personal interviews with famous and influential Oklahomans about their lives and contributions to the state). In this episode, George Henderson, a noted activist, human relations scholar and educator, joins host Dick Pryor for a discussion on racial equality.

This March 1, 2006 file photo shows civil rights pioneer Clara Luper in Oklahoma City.
AP Photo/Ty Russell, File

This week's Sunday Radio Matinee feature continues our commemoration of Black History Month as KGOU presents "A Conversation With... Clara Luper", an OETA production that offers personal interviews with famous and influential Oklahomans about their lives and contributions to the state.

The Invention Of Race

Feb 11, 2018
Gomes de Zurara, the Portuguese inventor of blackness (and whiteness), highlighted, on The Monument to the Discoveries in Lisbon, Portugal.
Harvey Barrison

Compiled by Award-winning producer John Biewen from the “Seeing White” series on his “Scene on Radio” podcast, The Invention of Race traces the development of racial and racist ideas from the ancient world — when there was no notion of race — up to the founding of the United States.  

In a new hour-long special, "Sexual Harassment: A Moment of Reckoning," Weekend Edition Sunday host Lulu Garcia-Navarro takes a deep dive into a national conversation that is growing louder by the day.

Radiolab / WNYC

The Supreme Court of the United States reconvenes this October and we thought the occasion marked the perfect opportunity to explore the history and inner workings of the highest court in the land by way of More Perfect - a 5-part special from the makers of Radiolab. Supreme Court decisions shape everything from marriage and money to public safety and sex.

IQ2 U.S.

Against the backdrop of North Korea's nuclear advances and escalating regional tensions, we ask: How should the U.S. respond to its most urgent national security threats?

In a wide-ranging evening of debate, General David Petraeus joins military historian Max Boot for a keynote conversation and broad look into the most pressing global challenges of the Trump era.

LBJ's War

Sep 17, 2017
PRI

A president of immense political shrewdness and skill, Lyndon Baines Johnson begins his White House tenure with a string of stunning accomplishments, and appears destined for Rushmore-level greatness.

Four years later, his presidency is in tatters, the spectacular early successes eclipsed by a single, equally spectacular failure: a ruinous and misbegotten war that will ultimately cost the lives of 58,000 Americans and upwards of two million Vietnamese.

(L to R) David Fritze, OK Watch Executive Editor; Anna Langthorn, Oklahoma Democratic Party Chair; Bill Shapard, founder SoonerPoll.com; Pam Pollard, Oklahoma Republican Party Chair
Oklahoma Watch

The 2018 election season is now underway. Republicans continue to dominate state offices, but Democrats are seeing signs of momentum for their party. Each party feels that there is a lot at stake in Oklahoma's upcoming elections.  

black and white portrait
PRX.org/AIR

In the early 1970’s, author Studs Terkel went around the country with a reel-to-reel tape recorder interviewing people about their jobs. The result was a book called "Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do." The book became a bestseller and even inspired a Broadway musical – something rare for an oral history collection. "Working" struck a nerve, because it elevated the stories of ordinary people and their daily lives. Studs celebrated the uncelebrated.

Typing hands
Re:sound

Re:sound is a collection of stories from the sonic hunter-gatherers at Third Coast International Audio Festival.  Hosted by award-winning Gwen Macsai, and produced by Dennis Funk, 'The Writing Out of Trouble Show' is the 5th episode of a special six-part 'summer' series of programs.  This program features two stories of love through loss.   The first deals with the wife of a terminally ill man who found herself having to deal with the difficult role of being the family spokesperson providing health

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