KGOU Sunday Radio Matinee

Sundays 12 - 1 p.m.

Public radio has many great programs that produce just a few episodes a year: Intelligence Squared U.S., America Abroad, and KGOU's student-produced show Assignment: Radio. This is where you'll find these and other limited-run programs.

Coming Up: 

Intelligence Squared U.S. "Blame Big Pharma" debate poster
Credit IQ2 US

Sunday, October 23, 2016 at noon

Sunday Radio Matinee

Intelligence Squared U.S. ~ "Blame Big Pharma"

Health care costs in the U.S. are some 18 percent of GNP, nearly double what other rich countries spend. We read of drug therapies that cost $100,000 a year or more, and of drug price increases that are 6 times the rate of inflation, on average, and often much more when mergers reduce competition in the industry. Is this a major driver of excessive health care costs? Or is it a by-product of the huge costs of getting new drugs approved? Has big pharma delivered drugs that reduce the need for costly surgeries, which extend life and improve its quality? Or do they deserve the blame that has been leveled against them? Join KGOU this Sunday at noon for the latest debate from Intelligence Squared U.S. 


Past Sunday Radio Matinee features: 

Ken Rudin/PRX

In 1960, the first televised presidential debates were held between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon, giving voters a unique opportunity to see the two candidates up close. Since 1976, all the major party nominees for president have participated in televised debates. The issues ranged from domestic concerns to foreign policy. But these debates are also remembered to many dramatic moments and memorable gaffes that have often helped decide the outcome of the elections.

State Question 779 is among the more hotly debated initiatives on the November 8 Oklahoma ballot.  The 'vote-yes' campaign is championed by University of Oklahoma President and former U.S. Sen. David Boren. Many educators have joined Boren in support of the proposal, citing low teacher pay and difficulty in attracting educators to the state. 

House Majority Leader Carl Albert (D-Okla.) sits in the Oval Office with President Lyndon Johnson.
Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library

Editor's Note: This program originally aired June 29, 2015.

Southeast Oklahoma is an unusual place, politically. Many southerners settled in the area after the Civil War, leading to its nickname “Little Dixie.”

Through the 20th century, it became the center of political power in Oklahoma, and the Democratic Party dominated politics well into the late 1990s. Decades after the formerly “Solid South” had switched to the Republican Party, Democrats enjoyed an 8:1 voter registration advantage in southeast Oklahoma.

IQ2 U.S. "The EPA Has Gone Too Far" debate graphic
Intelligence Squared U.S. / Intelligence Squared U.S.

Reducing carbon emissions is clearly good for the environment but often imposes substantial costs.  The costs are most obvious when coal companies go bankrupt, but can affect everyone indirectly through higher energy costs, slower economic growth, reduced employment, and lower business profits.   Has the Environmental Protection Agency considered the costs and benefits of its regulatory mandates fairly and appropriately?

State Question 792 is among several ballot initiatives Oklahoma voters will decide in November. If approved, the measure would revise the laws governing alcoholic beverage sales in the state. In a recent Oklahoma Watch public forumState Sen.

The 2016 presidential campaign has in many ways become a question of character. Even though Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump both have incredibly loyal supporters, the two candidates also inspire some intensely negative feelings among voters. Clinton and Trump are the two most unpopular candidates since modern polling began.

Futurework: How Technology Will Redefine the Culture of Work
IEEE Spectrum Magazine

Technological advances have put us on the edge of a new industrial revolution. Robert Reich, former Secretary of Labor and Professor of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, and Susan Hassler, Editor-In-Chief of IEEE Spectrum Magazine, are joined by engineers, scientists, and futurists from MIT, Carnegie-Mellon, Rice Univ., and the Institute for the Future to give listeners insights into how technology will redefine work in the not too distant future.

Lisa Miller descending Angel's Landing
Hearing Voices/NPR

The National Park Service turns 100 on August 25, 2016, and KGOU's 'Sunday Radio Matinee' commemorates the occasion by offering Hearing Voices: Walk In The Park

This encore broadcast from NPR's archives takes us from Walter Pierce community Park in Washington, D.C. to Utah's Zion National Park and several other national parks in between to explore the obvious and hidden beauty that lies in these special places.  

IQ2 U.S. "The President Has Usurped The Constitutional Power Of Congress"
Intelligence Squared U.S.

The Constitution provides that "All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States," and it goes on to grant Congress a robust-and fearsome-list of powers.

James Madison assumed that "in republican government, the legislative authority necessarily predominates," and he cautioned that the legislative department may tend to "draw all power into its impetuous vortex." But modern politics and law seem to tell a quite different story.

Image of the noted UT tower where Charles Whitman rained down bullets on his fellow students fifty years ago.
Miguel Gutierrez Jr. /KUT News

The Texas Standard oral history, “Out of the Blue: 50 Years After the UT Tower Shooting,” features selections from more than 100 exclusive, first-person accounts of the UT Tower shooting to paint a broad picture of the events that took place 50 years ago. Many of these eyewitness stories have not been shared publicly until now. 

America Abroad: Tibet

May 15, 2016
An exile Tibetan prays during an event to mark the 57th anniversary of the March 10, 1959, Tibetan Uprising Day, in Dharmsala, India, Thursday, March 10, 2016.

The Dalai Lama's 80th birthday has been a cause for celebration but also consternation for Tibetans at home and in the diaspora. Now, as he grows older, doubt hovers in the air as to who will carry on the struggle when he's gone.

Melyssa Rodiguez shares her story.
Jason Falchook/The Moth

This week's Sunday Radio Matinee feature is a special Mother's Day edition of The Moth Radio Hour. A mother helps her daughter get her first contact lenses, an unwanted parental intervention at a school concert, a new mother in Zambia awaits test results, a life or death bee sting and a teenage mother who couldn't be happier to welcome her child to the world. Join The Moth's Artistic Director Catherine Burns for an hour of stories by, for and about Mom! 

Oklahoma has one of the largest Native American populations in the United States. By using their right to govern themselves, some of Oklahoma’s tribes have become economic powerhouses, contributing hugely to the state economy. But some tribes are faring much better than others. Which tribes are doing well? Has the political influence of Native Americans – and the treatment of their culture – changed in line with growing economic success? And, are there valuable lessons to be learned from Oklahoma for indigenous peoples in the rest of the United States and around the world?

robot arm holding human skull

As technology rapidly progresses, some proponents of artificial intelligence believe that it will help solve complex social challenges and offer immortality via virtual humans. But AI’s critics say that we should proceed with caution, that any rewards may be overpromised, and the pursuit of 'super' intelligence and autonomous machines may result in unintended consequences.

The Fifth Beatle: A George Martin Appreciation
Paul Ingles/

To say that Sir George Henry Martin was an acclaimed record producer, arranger, composer and audio engineer would be an incomplete summary of his skills. After all, Martin was the “Fifth Beatle.” It was George Martin who helped to transform the lads from Liverpool into the biggest musical act of their time.