KGOU Sunday Radio Matinee

Sundays 12 - 1 p.m.

Public radio has many great programs that produce just a few episodes a year: Intelligence Squared U.S., America Abroad, and KGOU's student-produced show Assignment: Radio. This is where you'll find these and other limited-run programs.

An exile Tibetan prays during an event to mark the 57th anniversary of the March 10, 1959, Tibetan Uprising Day, in Dharmsala, India, Thursday, March 10, 2016. The uprising of the Tibetan people against the Chinese rule was brutally quelled by Chinese army forcing the spiritual leader the Dalai Lama and hundreds of Tibetans to come into exile.
Credit TSERING TOPGYAL/ ASSOCIATED PRESS

Coming Up:

Sunday, May 15th at noon

​Sunday Radio Matinee

America Abroad: Tibet

The Dalai Lama's 80th birthday has been a cause for celebration but also consternation for Tibetans at home and in the diaspora. Now, as he grows older, doubt hovers in the air as to who will carry on the struggle when he's gone. Tibet has long been known as a place of mystique and intrigue for its ancient customs and beliefs.  The teachings of Tibetan Buddhism and the Dalai Lama have garnered widespread attention around the world, from the media to Hollywood celebrities.  Despite this, the practices of Tibetan Buddhism and the real lives of modern day Tibetans are not well understood.  In this hour from America Abroad, we uncover the truths beyond the stereotypes, traveling to the Chinese city of Chengdu, near the Tibetan border, to explore the tensions between Tibetan culture and Chinese urbanization efforts; In Dharamsala, India we examine how Tibetans in exile deal with Chinese surveillance while gradually embracing technology; And in the US we visit a Tibetan Buddhist Monastery in upstate New York to learn why Tibetan Buddhism has become appealing to so many Westerners. 

Past Sunday Radio Matinee features: 

America Abroad: Tibet

May 15, 2016
An exile Tibetan prays during an event to mark the 57th anniversary of the March 10, 1959, Tibetan Uprising Day, in Dharmsala, India, Thursday, March 10, 2016.
TSERING TOPGYAL/ ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Dalai Lama's 80th birthday has been a cause for celebration but also consternation for Tibetans at home and in the diaspora. Now, as he grows older, doubt hovers in the air as to who will carry on the struggle when he's gone.

Melyssa Rodiguez shares her story.
Jason Falchook/The Moth

This week's Sunday Radio Matinee feature is a special Mother's Day edition of The Moth Radio Hour. A mother helps her daughter get her first contact lenses, an unwanted parental intervention at a school concert, a new mother in Zambia awaits test results, a life or death bee sting and a teenage mother who couldn't be happier to welcome her child to the world. Join The Moth's Artistic Director Catherine Burns for an hour of stories by, for and about Mom! 

Oklahoma has one of the largest Native American populations in the United States. By using their right to govern themselves, some of Oklahoma’s tribes have become economic powerhouses, contributing hugely to the state economy. But some tribes are faring much better than others. Which tribes are doing well? Has the political influence of Native Americans – and the treatment of their culture – changed in line with growing economic success? And, are there valuable lessons to be learned from Oklahoma for indigenous peoples in the rest of the United States and around the world?

robot arm holding human skull
IQ2US/PRX

As technology rapidly progresses, some proponents of artificial intelligence believe that it will help solve complex social challenges and offer immortality via virtual humans. But AI’s critics say that we should proceed with caution, that any rewards may be overpromised, and the pursuit of 'super' intelligence and autonomous machines may result in unintended consequences.

The Fifth Beatle: A George Martin Appreciation
Paul Ingles/PRX.org

To say that Sir George Henry Martin was an acclaimed record producer, arranger, composer and audio engineer would be an incomplete summary of his skills. After all, Martin was the “Fifth Beatle.” It was George Martin who helped to transform the lads from Liverpool into the biggest musical act of their time.

Gillian Blease, Getty Images / Intelligence Squared U.S.

Student-involved protests seem to be erupting at increasing rates on university campuses across the country. To many, these students are speaking out against various injustices that have long been manifested in "unwelcoming", sometimes "hostile" environments. But to critics, many of these students have gone too far, creating an atmosphere of intolerance for opposing or unpopular points of view.  Are the protestors silencing free speech, or are they just trying to be heard?

Hearing Voices: Her Stories
Victoria Golding

Host Dmae Roberts of Stories1st.org, for Women's History Month, presents Stories By, For, and Of Women: The Kitchen Sisters go to "Tupperware" parties. A supermarket checker checks out of her life. Jenifir returns "Home From Africa" with all 13 Symptoms of Chronic Peace Corps Withdrawal. We also hear a story-collage of and about "Sisters." In a new syntax of whispers and words, Susan Stone tells the tale of "Ruby" and her husbands. And Sonia Sanchez, Tracie Morris, Jill Battson and Meryn Cadell perform short poems.

Intelligence Squared U.S. "Lifespans Are Long Enough"
Intelligence Squared U.S.

What if we didn’t have to grow old and die? The average American can expect to live for 78.8 years, an improvement over the days before clean water and vaccines, but it's still not long enough for most of us. So researchers around the world have been working on arresting the process of aging through biotechnology.

Lawrence Stasyszen, abbott of St. Gregory's Abbey, stands inside the monastery's condemned workshop in Shawnee, Okla. The monastery and nearby college are still reeling from millions in damage from a 5.7-magnitude quake that struck in 2011.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

In 2014, Oklahoma had more than three times as many earthquakes as California, and this year, the state is on track for even more. A lot of them are small, but some towns are seeing a quake almost every day, and seismologists warn that large and damaging earthquakes are becoming more likely.

The government in the Sooner State has only recently acknowledged the scope of the oil and gas industry’s role in the problem.

From left to right: David Prater, Kris Steele, John Whetsel, Terri White and Clay Bennett participate in a forum Wednesday, Dec. 2, about Oklahoma County's criminal justice system.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Last month the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber outlined a new approach to decrease Oklahoma County’s overcrowded jail population and increase public safety.

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