KGOU

KGOU Sunday Radio Matinee

Sundays 12 - 1 p.m.

Public radio has many great programs that produce just a few episodes a year: Intelligence Squared U.S., America Abroad, and KGOU's student-produced show Assignment: Radio. This is where you'll find these and other limited-run programs.

Coming Up: 

IQ2US - "Charter Schools Are Overrated" (debate motion)
Credit Intelligence Squared U.S.

Sunday, March 26, 2017 @ Noon

Intelligence Squared U.S. ~ "Charter Schools Are Overrated"

In the 25 years since Minnesota passed the first charter school law, these publicly funded but privately operated schools have become a highly sought-after alternative to traditional public education. Many charter schools boast of high test scores, strict academic expectations, and high graduation rates. Opponents argue that charters, which are subject to fewer regulations and less oversight, lack accountability, and take much-needed resources from public schools.   IQ2's John Donvan moderates this latest IQ2 debate about charter schools... and whether they're "overrated." The debaters are Gary Miron, Jeanne Allen, Julian Vasquez Heilig, and Gerard Robinson. 

Past Sunday Radio Matinee Features: 

State Question 792 is among several ballot initiatives Oklahoma voters will decide in November. If approved, the measure would revise the laws governing alcoholic beverage sales in the state. In a recent Oklahoma Watch public forumState Sen.

The 2016 presidential campaign has in many ways become a question of character. Even though Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump both have incredibly loyal supporters, the two candidates also inspire some intensely negative feelings among voters. Clinton and Trump are the two most unpopular candidates since modern polling began.

Futurework: How Technology Will Redefine the Culture of Work
IEEE Spectrum Magazine

Technological advances have put us on the edge of a new industrial revolution. Robert Reich, former Secretary of Labor and Professor of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, and Susan Hassler, Editor-In-Chief of IEEE Spectrum Magazine, are joined by engineers, scientists, and futurists from MIT, Carnegie-Mellon, Rice Univ., and the Institute for the Future to give listeners insights into how technology will redefine work in the not too distant future.

Lisa Miller descending Angel's Landing
Hearing Voices/NPR

The National Park Service turns 100 on August 25, 2016, and KGOU's 'Sunday Radio Matinee' commemorates the occasion by offering Hearing Voices: Walk In The Park

This encore broadcast from NPR's archives takes us from Walter Pierce community Park in Washington, D.C. to Utah's Zion National Park and several other national parks in between to explore the obvious and hidden beauty that lies in these special places.  

IQ2 U.S. "The President Has Usurped The Constitutional Power Of Congress"
Intelligence Squared U.S.

The Constitution provides that "All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States," and it goes on to grant Congress a robust-and fearsome-list of powers.

James Madison assumed that "in republican government, the legislative authority necessarily predominates," and he cautioned that the legislative department may tend to "draw all power into its impetuous vortex." But modern politics and law seem to tell a quite different story.

Image of the noted UT tower where Charles Whitman rained down bullets on his fellow students fifty years ago.
Miguel Gutierrez Jr. /KUT News

The Texas Standard oral history, “Out of the Blue: 50 Years After the UT Tower Shooting,” features selections from more than 100 exclusive, first-person accounts of the UT Tower shooting to paint a broad picture of the events that took place 50 years ago. Many of these eyewitness stories have not been shared publicly until now. 

America Abroad: Tibet

May 15, 2016
An exile Tibetan prays during an event to mark the 57th anniversary of the March 10, 1959, Tibetan Uprising Day, in Dharmsala, India, Thursday, March 10, 2016.
TSERING TOPGYAL/ ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Dalai Lama's 80th birthday has been a cause for celebration but also consternation for Tibetans at home and in the diaspora. Now, as he grows older, doubt hovers in the air as to who will carry on the struggle when he's gone.

Melyssa Rodiguez shares her story.
Jason Falchook/The Moth

This week's Sunday Radio Matinee feature is a special Mother's Day edition of The Moth Radio Hour. A mother helps her daughter get her first contact lenses, an unwanted parental intervention at a school concert, a new mother in Zambia awaits test results, a life or death bee sting and a teenage mother who couldn't be happier to welcome her child to the world. Join The Moth's Artistic Director Catherine Burns for an hour of stories by, for and about Mom! 

Oklahoma has one of the largest Native American populations in the United States. By using their right to govern themselves, some of Oklahoma’s tribes have become economic powerhouses, contributing hugely to the state economy. But some tribes are faring much better than others. Which tribes are doing well? Has the political influence of Native Americans – and the treatment of their culture – changed in line with growing economic success? And, are there valuable lessons to be learned from Oklahoma for indigenous peoples in the rest of the United States and around the world?

robot arm holding human skull
IQ2US/PRX

As technology rapidly progresses, some proponents of artificial intelligence believe that it will help solve complex social challenges and offer immortality via virtual humans. But AI’s critics say that we should proceed with caution, that any rewards may be overpromised, and the pursuit of 'super' intelligence and autonomous machines may result in unintended consequences.

The Fifth Beatle: A George Martin Appreciation
Paul Ingles/PRX.org

To say that Sir George Henry Martin was an acclaimed record producer, arranger, composer and audio engineer would be an incomplete summary of his skills. After all, Martin was the “Fifth Beatle.” It was George Martin who helped to transform the lads from Liverpool into the biggest musical act of their time.

Gillian Blease, Getty Images / Intelligence Squared U.S.

Student-involved protests seem to be erupting at increasing rates on university campuses across the country. To many, these students are speaking out against various injustices that have long been manifested in "unwelcoming", sometimes "hostile" environments. But to critics, many of these students have gone too far, creating an atmosphere of intolerance for opposing or unpopular points of view.  Are the protestors silencing free speech, or are they just trying to be heard?

Hearing Voices: Her Stories
Victoria Golding

Host Dmae Roberts of Stories1st.org, for Women's History Month, presents Stories By, For, and Of Women: The Kitchen Sisters go to "Tupperware" parties. A supermarket checker checks out of her life. Jenifir returns "Home From Africa" with all 13 Symptoms of Chronic Peace Corps Withdrawal. We also hear a story-collage of and about "Sisters." In a new syntax of whispers and words, Susan Stone tells the tale of "Ruby" and her husbands. And Sonia Sanchez, Tracie Morris, Jill Battson and Meryn Cadell perform short poems.

Intelligence Squared U.S. "Lifespans Are Long Enough"
Intelligence Squared U.S.

What if we didn’t have to grow old and die? The average American can expect to live for 78.8 years, an improvement over the days before clean water and vaccines, but it's still not long enough for most of us. So researchers around the world have been working on arresting the process of aging through biotechnology.

Lawrence Stasyszen, abbott of St. Gregory's Abbey, stands inside the monastery's condemned workshop in Shawnee, Okla. The monastery and nearby college are still reeling from millions in damage from a 5.7-magnitude quake that struck in 2011.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

In 2014, Oklahoma had more than three times as many earthquakes as California, and this year, the state is on track for even more. A lot of them are small, but some towns are seeing a quake almost every day, and seismologists warn that large and damaging earthquakes are becoming more likely.

The government in the Sooner State has only recently acknowledged the scope of the oil and gas industry’s role in the problem.

From left to right: David Prater, Kris Steele, John Whetsel, Terri White and Clay Bennett participate in a forum Wednesday, Dec. 2, about Oklahoma County's criminal justice system.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Last month the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber outlined a new approach to decrease Oklahoma County’s overcrowded jail population and increase public safety.

Assignment: Radio - December 20, 2015

Dec 20, 2015
Intersection
Daniel Jarosz / Pixabay

This week on Assignment Radio, the student reporters hang out with local musician Ben Hill and bus driver Shirley Bosscawen and visit the McFarland Food Pantry.

Later on in the program they explore the theme of intersections- the points at which paths cross. Just like the streets in a city or lines on a graph, people’s individual journeys through life often converge briefly before continuing off in different directions. These moments can teach us about a different way of looking at the world and even alter the way we look at ourselves.

Farm to fork: Uncovering hazards in our food systems

Dec 6, 2015
illustration of farm worker
Allison McCartney / Reveal

Reveal looks at the complicated networks of labor, trade and regulation that carry meat, produce and other products to our tables.

We’ll upend your ideas about what kind of chicken is most susceptible to salmonella, unveil the secret history of pesticides that fuel the modern strawberry industry and look at a workers movement in Florida that’s transformed the tomato-picking business from the ground up.

The fowl business of salmonella

Assignment: Radio - November 2015

Dec 4, 2015
Radio Microphone
Dennis Hill / Flickr

This is Assignment: Radio, KGOU's student-produced public affairs program focusing on issues and events on the University of Oklahoma campus.

One of the things National Public Radio is known is the powerful one-on-one interviews of journalists like Terry Gross and Diane Rehm. This week the Assignment Radio student reporters try their hand at the format… One guest, one microphone and a few questions in mind to help us gain some insights into the lives and experiences of others.  

Intelligence Squared U.S.

Today, a national debate rages about the functioning of our criminal justice system. Is it fair? Does it serve the ends of justice and public safety? Does it apply equally to all? Prosecutors, endowed with both autonomy and immunity, hold immense power within this system. They control secret grand jury proceedings, who will be prosecuted, and the specifics of charges.

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