KGOU Sunday Radio Matinee

Sundays 12 - 1 p.m.

Public radio has many excellent limited-run programs that are regularly featured in this 'variety' hour: Intelligence Squared U.S., America Abroad, Invisibilia, etc. The Sunday Radio Matinee also plays host to KGOU's own documentary productions and various other special content offerings. 

"Document Leaks: The Consequences Of Revealing Secrets" from America Abroad
Credit America Abroad / PRI

Sunday, March 4th at Noon 

KGOU's Sunday Radio Matinee

"America Abroad: Document Leaks..." 

This week's Sunday Radio Matinee feature comes from America Abroad - a program that takes you on an hour-long audio journey deep inside an international news story.

In "Document Leaks: The Consequences Of Revealing Secrets", host Madeleine Brand looks at the balance of protecting national security versus freedom of the press and the responsibility of journalists once they obtain leaked documents. 

Past Sunday Radio Matinee Features: 

Re:sound : The Dinner Table Show

Jun 7, 2015

Re:sound is Third Coast's remix of music, documentaries, found sound, sound bites, and little audio surprises we find all over the world. The show features personal narratives, sonic portraits, investigative documentaries, experimental sound art, and humorous essays. It's radio you can't hear anywhere else, unless you live everywhere else. Host Gwen Macsai presents this remarkable audio work along with behind-the-scenes interviews and other “bonus tracks” for your listening pleasure.

We've come a long way since 1975, when a newspaper in Midland, Texas, featured an advertisement about a personal pocket computer wizard that had the broad mathematical abilities of a slide rule: a Sharp calculator.

But, are we smarter now that technology has put a lot more than a slide rule into our pockets? Or are we so dependent on technology to do things for us that we are losing the ability to make our own magic, mentally, socially and politically?

We've Never Been the Same: A War Story

May 24, 2015
Some of Delta 187 Rakassans
Adam Piore /

All wars are the same, it is said; only the scenery changes. And the repercussions are pretty much the same too. At Fort Campbell before deployment, Delta was a ragtag bunch, the “leftovers” as one of their fellow soldiers put it, but on the night of March 18th, 1968, they became heroes.

Anna Vignet / Reveal

In part 2 of Reveal’s in-depth look at law and disorder, we expose some of the tensions between police and the communities they serve and how video cameras are dramatically changing the public’s relationship with law enforcement.

Listen to the program

Assignment: Radio - May 10, 2015

May 10, 2015
Jenny Nunez

It's the final episode of the Spring 2015 season of Assignment: Radio. The theme is "crossing the line." 

When thinking about people who cross the line or push the limits, usually a specific person comes to mind. It could be a friend, a celebrity, a sibling or maybe yourself. They are the people who won’t let the rules stop them from having their own adventure.

The death penalty is legal in more than 30 states, but the long-controversial practice has come under renewed scrutiny after a series of botched executions in several states last year.

Opponents of capital punishment argue that the death penalty undermines the fair administration of justice, as wealth, geography, race and quality of legal representation all come into play, with uneven results.

Reveal: Law and Disorder (Part 1)

Apr 25, 2015

On Sunday, April 26, KGOU's Sunday Radio Matinee presents a new episode of Reveal.

Listen to this program

Reveal investigates why minorities and kids with special needs face criminal charges for acting out in school; traces how people are building assault weapons from parts they buy online and uncover how police are poisoned on the job; and gains insight into an elusive character fighting the death penalty in the most high profile of ways.

The Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The bomb that destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City killed 168 people - including 19 children. It injured hundreds more, and forever shaped the community.

April 19, 1995 started as an idyllic spring morning - clear skies, calm winds - better than most Wednesdays during the state’s usually-turbulent severe weather season. Nothing seemed out of the ordinary. Workers showed up to their jobs, and went about their regular routines.

That all changed at 9:02 a.m.