KGOU

KGOU Sunday Radio Matinee

Sundays 12 - 1 p.m.

Public radio has many excellent limited-run programs that are regularly featured in this 'variety' hour: Intelligence Squared U.S., America Abroad, Invisibilia, etc. The Sunday Radio Matinee also plays host to KGOU's own documentary productions and various other special content offerings. 

Credit slgckgc/Flickr / NPR

Sunday, December 17 at Noon

Hanukkah Lights 2017

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem, the lighting of the menorah and the spiritual strength of the Jewish people. It's a time to celebrate family, tradition, miracles and mitzvahs. For the 27th year in a row, NPR celebrates the Festival of Lights with stories of the season. Join Susan Stamberg and Murray Horwitz as they read tales by Andrea Kamens, Debra Darvick, Elizabeth Graver, Grace Paley and Evan Guilford-Blake.

  • Andrea Kamen's story "The Blue Wool Coat" reminds us that being selfless is the biggest way to show love.
  • Debra Darvick's piece, "Protestant B Not" is the true story of a Jewish helicopter pilot in Saudi Arabia.
  • In "A Christmas Mitzvah" by Elizabeth Graver, a family embraces the Hannukah spirit by volunteering in their community.
  • "The Loudest Voice" by Grace Paley reveals how a Jewish girl learns more about herself after performing in a Christmas play.
  • The final piece -- Evan Gilford Blake's "Dreidel" -- tells the heartwarming story of a grandfather's love on the last night of Hanukkah.

Past Sunday Radio Matinee Features: 

Anna Vignet / Reveal

In part 2 of Reveal’s in-depth look at law and disorder, we expose some of the tensions between police and the communities they serve and how video cameras are dramatically changing the public’s relationship with law enforcement.

Listen to the program

Assignment: Radio - May 10, 2015

May 10, 2015
Jenny Nunez

It's the final episode of the Spring 2015 season of Assignment: Radio. The theme is "crossing the line." 

When thinking about people who cross the line or push the limits, usually a specific person comes to mind. It could be a friend, a celebrity, a sibling or maybe yourself. They are the people who won’t let the rules stop them from having their own adventure.

The death penalty is legal in more than 30 states, but the long-controversial practice has come under renewed scrutiny after a series of botched executions in several states last year.

Opponents of capital punishment argue that the death penalty undermines the fair administration of justice, as wealth, geography, race and quality of legal representation all come into play, with uneven results.

Reveal: Law and Disorder (Part 1)

Apr 25, 2015
Reveal

On Sunday, April 26, KGOU's Sunday Radio Matinee presents a new episode of Reveal.

Listen to this program

Reveal investigates why minorities and kids with special needs face criminal charges for acting out in school; traces how people are building assault weapons from parts they buy online and uncover how police are poisoned on the job; and gains insight into an elusive character fighting the death penalty in the most high profile of ways.

The Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The bomb that destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City killed 168 people - including 19 children. It injured hundreds more, and forever shaped the community.

April 19, 1995 started as an idyllic spring morning - clear skies, calm winds - better than most Wednesdays during the state’s usually-turbulent severe weather season. Nothing seemed out of the ordinary. Workers showed up to their jobs, and went about their regular routines.

That all changed at 9:02 a.m.

Pages