KGOU

Science Friday

Fridays 1 - 3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Ira Flatow

Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4 p.m. Eastern time. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand. Panels of expert guests join Science Friday's host, Ira Flatow, a veteran science journalist, to discuss science -- and to take questions from listeners during the call-in portion of the program.

To participate, call 1 (844) 724-8255 or Twitter users can tweet questions @scifri.

More information

Ways to Connect

An Earthly Origin for Moon Oxygen?

Feb 4, 2017

Sure, they're space rocks that sometimes hurtle past Earth a little too close for comfort — asteroids, that is. But for researchers involved in two new NASA missions titled Lucy and Psyche, asteroids are much more than an occasional nuisance: They're time capsules that could unlock secrets of the early solar system.

Almost half of what we do at work could be automated by 2055

Jan 28, 2017
3
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/skewgee/3161505670/">Matthew Hurst</a>. <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. Image cropped.

Almost half the activities people are paid to do globally could be automated using current levels of technology, according to a new report from the McKinsey Global Institute.

But before we start fretting about job security — or daydreaming about lives of leisure surrounded by "Jetsons"-style robot staff, the report includes a few other key details.

Scientific Simplicity by Design

Jan 28, 2017

Building an Immunity to Fake News

Jan 28, 2017

How States Can Step Up for Science

Jan 28, 2017

The only physicist in Congress, on the state of science on the Hill

Jan 23, 2017

When the 115th Congress was sworn in on Jan. 3, there was no shortage of solemn ceremony, smiling children and photo ops with Joe Biden. But one thing the room lacked? Scientists.

“At this point, I think I am the only Ph.D. scientist of any kind [in Congress],” says Bill Foster, D-Illinois. “We have some political scientists, I think a mathematician, but it feels sort of lonely.”

Despite the medical advances of the past century, malaria is still a global scourge. According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 429,000 people died of malaria worldwide in 2015, and there were over 200 million new cases.

Solar panels are cheaper than ever. But some manufacturers are losing money.

Jan 21, 2017
8
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/usfws_pacificsw/8159035850/in/photostream/">Sarah Swenty/USFWS</a>. <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>. Image cropped.&nbsp;

The price of solar photovoltaic panels is coming down, and it’s great news for consumers, solar installers and the environment.

But not everyone is happy about cheap solar: The price of solar photovoltaics is so low, that, according to Bloomberg, some manufacturers were likely selling at a loss in December 2016.

Where Do Baby Seahorses Come From?

Jan 21, 2017

The Gesture That Changed Human History

Jan 21, 2017

Animating the friendly ocean in Disney's 'Moana'

Jan 16, 2017

Disney’s newest animated film “Moana” tells the story of a teenager who goes on a quest to save her people, leaving the safety of her home island in the South Pacific to travel the ocean.

Three ways to die on Venus, and other space facts

Jan 14, 2017

Today we call it the “Big Dipper,” but in the year 75000, we may look up in the night sky and admire a constellation known affectionately as the “Big Spatula.”

As astronomer Dean Regas explains, that’s because the stars are moving relative to our position here. “And so you know, over thousands and thousands of years, the constellations we see today will actually change a little bit,” he says. “Where we saw the Big Dipper, they'll see something that looks like a big spatula. And who knows what kind of mythology will spring from that.”

Pages