KGOU

Science Friday

Fridays 1 - 3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Ira Flatow

Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4 p.m. Eastern time. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand. Panels of expert guests join Science Friday's host, Ira Flatow, a veteran science journalist, to discuss science -- and to take questions from listeners during the call-in portion of the program.

To participate, call 1 (844) 724-8255 or Twitter users can tweet questions @scifri.

More information

Ways to Connect

Bad News Bears For Yeti Hunters

Dec 1, 2017

In The South, Examining An HIV Epidemic

Dec 1, 2017

Bad News Bears For Yeti Hunters

Dec 1, 2017

To The Batcave!

Nov 27, 2017

To The Batcave!

Nov 27, 2017

Most bees are solitary animals, and 4 other surprising bee facts

Nov 26, 2017
3
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/oregonstateuniversity/36198139401">Andony Melathopoulos/Oregon State University</a>. <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. Image cropped.

When you think of bees, your mind probably heads straight to the big, buzzing bumblebee, or the social honeybee flitting from flower to flower.

But there are thousands of other bees out there, too — some no larger than a grain of rice. And according to Shalene Jha, an associate professor of integrative biology at the University of Texas at Austin, these bees aren’t just important pollinators — they also have some curious quirks that you may not have heard about.

1. Most bees are solitary animals.

Keeping tabs on the elusive Florida panther

Nov 25, 2017
5
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/usfwssoutheast/5164633394">Larry W. Richardson/USFWS</a>. <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>. Image cropped.

The Florida panther may be an icon of the state and its sports teams, but in real life, the big, lanky cat has long been endangered. There may be as few as 120 panthers left in the wild, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission — but even that low number is better than in the past.

Pages