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Science Friday

Fridays 1 - 3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Ira Flatow

Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4 p.m. Eastern time. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand. Panels of expert guests join Science Friday's host, Ira Flatow, a veteran science journalist, to discuss science -- and to take questions from listeners during the call-in portion of the program.

To participate, call 1 (844) 724-8255 or Twitter users can tweet questions @scifri.

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Ways to Connect

What's the role of social media in the news media?

Dec 10, 2016
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Mariana Bazo/Reuters 

In the days immediately following the US presidential election, a quick Google News search of the phrase “final election results” netted a slimy top result. It was an article claiming, incorrectly, that Donald Trump had won the popular vote.

The Cost of Co-Pay Drug Coupons

Dec 10, 2016

Time travel, microbes, black holes, and polar bears. There’s something for everyone on this year’s list of best science books.

Maria Popova, founder of Brain Pickings, and Scientific American editor Lee Billings have combed the shelves and come up with this list of 18 books you might want to ask Santa to stick under your tree.

Maria Popova’s picks:

Black Hole Blues, by Janna Levin

It’s 2016. Why is the common cold still so hard to avoid?

Dec 5, 2016

Winter is setting in, marking the unofficial height of the dreaded “cold season” in offices and schools across the country.

The common cold is a familiar foe: Maybe you’re fighting one off right now, or stocking up on vitamin C, tissues and canned chicken soup for the long battle ahead. But despite the regularity of colds in daily life, there’s a lot you may not know about them. Where do they come from? Is there actually a link between colds and cold weather? And why don’t we have the ultimate weapon — a vaccine — to beat them once and for all?

A new report in Nature gives hopeful news about how we could recover from paralyzing spinal cord injuries in the future.

The moon just had its Hollywood close-up. In mid-November, its slightly elliptical orbit brought the full moon closer to Earth than it’s been since 1948, and it dazzled in the part. Photos from sky-gazers around the world show the familiar orb looking round, bright and startlingly big.

As it stands, the mushroom is already a multi-purpose organism: Aside from its ecological functions, it can be eaten as nourishment, brewed as tea, taken as a naturopathic remedy and used in dyes. But a San Francisco start-up by the name of MycoWorks has even more plans for mushrooms, starting with a leather-like material made from the fungi.

Conservationists want you to eat more lionfish. Wait, what?

Nov 29, 2016

With its arsenal of spiny, venom-tipped fin rays, the lionfish is not a typical (or easy) ingredient in your fish tacos. But at Norman’s Cay, a restaurant in downtown Manhattan, lionfish comes grilled or fried — and its mild white meat is starting to show up in other restaurants in Florida and New York.

If there’s one word that can sum up our feelings about this year’s presidential election — the most polarizing and bitterly fought in recent memory — it might just be “stressful.”

In October, a survey by the American Psychological Association found that the election was a significant source of stress for more than half of all Americans. And now that Election Day has passed, we’re probably still reeling — whether from a hard-fought battle or our candidate’s loss at the polls.

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