KGOU

Science Friday

Fridays 1 - 3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Ira Flatow

Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4 p.m. Eastern time. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand. Panels of expert guests join Science Friday's host, Ira Flatow, a veteran science journalist, to discuss science -- and to take questions from listeners during the call-in portion of the program.

To participate, call 1 (844) 724-8255 or Twitter users can tweet questions @scifri.

More information

Ways to Connect

Sea Spray’s Tie To The Sky

May 13, 2017

The star-nosed mole may take the prize for the most extreme adaptation. Its eponymous nose, which looks like a fleshy pink starfish sticking out of its face, is the most sensitive organ of any mammal's on Earth.

For privacy wonks and internet companies alike, April was a bellwether month: President Donald Trump signed Senate Joint Resolution 34 into law, rolling back internet privacy rules issued last December by the Federal Communications Commission.

From oral history, a 14,000-year-old archaeological discovery

May 7, 2017

In their oral history, the Heiltsuk people describe how the area around Triquet Island, on the western coast of their territory in British Columbia, remained open land during the ice age.

“People flocked there for survival because everywhere else was being covered by ice, and all the ocean was freezing and all of the food resources were dwindling,” says Heiltsuk Nation member William Housty.

And late last year, archaeologists excavating an ancient Heiltsuk village on Triquet Island uncovered the physical evidence: a few flakes of charcoal from a long-ago hearth.

New research from NASA’s Cassini mission has all eyes on Enceladus, Saturn’s sixth-largest moon. The research, recently published in Science magazine, indicates that plumes of vapor escaping from cracks in the moon’s icy shell are full of molecular hydrogen, the fuel for microbial life.

The House That Snot Built

May 6, 2017

Borne To Be Wild

May 6, 2017

Last year, rescue workers began using a vessel called Emily to pull stranded refugees from rough waters near the Greek island of Lesbos. Part buoy and part life raft, Emily helped more than 240 asylum seekers to safety in its first 10 days of use.

This pressurized, skirt-like machine helps keep astronauts fit

Apr 29, 2017

Many engineers spend their entire careers focused on a single area of research — say, the design of airplane components. Then there's Christine Dailey: Put simply, she's not your average engineer. 

Dailey has explored everything from fluids to electronics and has built an exercise machine for astronauts. She has designed autonomous vehicles and much more (some of which she's not allowed to talk about), all while finishing her PhD at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and working as a mechanical engineer for the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC.

Modern smartphones are full of sensors that can make the devices more intuitive — counting your steps, for example, or detecting when you’ve tilted your screen. But according to a new study published in the International Journal of Information Security, those features could come at a price: your security.

Pages