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The Splendid Table

Wednesdays 11 a.m. - 12 Noon
  • Hosted by Lynne Rossetto Kasper and Francis Lam

More than just a place to share great recipes, acclaimed food writer and cooking teacher Lynne Rossetto Kasper explores everything about food: the culture, the science, the history, the back stories and the deeper meanings that come together every time people sit down to enjoy a meal.

Recipes and much more

The Final Exam: Peter's Wine Quiz

Dec 8, 2017

Excerpted from Educating Peter by Lettie Teague. Copyright 2007 by Lettie Teague. Reprinted by permission from Scribner, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, Inc.

Grass Fed Beef

Dec 8, 2017

New York Times columnist Marion Burros says these are currently the most reliable sources for grass fed beef. Visit the Web sites for where to buy and online ordering information:

Tallgrass Beef Company
www.tallgrassbeef.com

Laurel Ridge Grass Fed Beef
www.lrgfb.com

Faygo Pop

Dec 8, 2017

Faygo Beverages, Inc. recently celebrated their 100th anniversary. Started in 1907 by two brothers, the beloved and quirky Detroit company was the one that turned soda into "pop." Today, the company produces approximately 40 flavors of soda pop, Ohana non-carbonated beverages, and a new energy drink called Rip It. Take a look at their website for more information.

Faygo Beverages, Inc.
3579 Gratiot Avenue
Detroit, MI 48207
313-925-1600
www.faygo.com

Produce That Should Not Be Refrigerated

Dec 8, 2017

Russ Parsons, food and wine columnist for the Los Angeles Times and author of How to Pick a Peach: The Search for Flavor from Farm to Table (Houghton Mifflin, 2007), says never refrigerate these fruits and vegetables:

Vampire Turkey

Dec 8, 2017

What do you say to someone who optimistically decides to develop a recipe with 80 cloves of garlic? I mean, is there ever enough garlic?

Well, surprisingly, the answer turns out to be yes. As we were dreaming up this year's Thanksgiving menu— one rich with spices and aromas — Lynne decided to do the turkey in a French-inspired take on the classic chicken with 40 cloves of garlic. Since turkey is kind of a giant chicken, it makes sense, right?

Bill Smith: The Key 3

Dec 8, 2017
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The Splendid Table

Chef Bill Smith of James Beard award-winning restaurant Crook's Corner is known for his classic Southern dishes. In this installment of The Key 3, he shares with Lynne Rossetto Kasper the techniques behind three of his favorite recipes: Fried Oysters, Banana Pudding and Collard Greens. 

Here are Bill's keys, as told to Lynne.

Isaac Mizrahi: The Key 3

Dec 8, 2017
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The Splendid Table

Isaac Mizrahi is the award-winning international designer and Project Runway judge. He's a self-taught cook who doesn't waste time. He goes straight to the masters and has a critical eye for whose recipes to trust. In this installment of The Key 3, he shares with Lynne Rossetto Kasper his methods for preparing a basic tomato sauce, a family vinaigrette and Jacques Pepin's chocolate souffle.

Here are Isaac's keys, as told to Lynne:

John Besh: The Key 3

Dec 8, 2017
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The Splendid Table

Award-winning chef John Besh is the force behind nine acclaimed restaurants. In this installment of The Key 3, the author of My Family Table: A Passionate Plea for Home Cooking shares with Lynne Rossetto Kasper the techniques behind three of his favorite recipes: Fried Egg Sunny-Side Up, Cream of Any Vegetable Soup and Risotto.

Here are John's keys, as told to Lynne:

If there is one thing that our friends at America's Test Kitchen know is true, it's that you can roast almost anything. In fact, they are putting the finishing touches on a cookbook focused solely on roasting. Their many hours spent in the test kitchen included roasting not only classic large cuts of meat, but foods like fish and vegetables. Managing Producer Sally Swift talked with Julia Collin Davison and Bridget Lancaster, hosts of America’s Test Kitchen. They talked about how they love roasting for both convenience and flavor.

Spicing up Thanksgiving with Indian-inspired dishes

Nov 17, 2017

Thanksgiving is one of our favorite food holidays, but we also know it can be rather bland. A lot of starches, thick gravies, and dishes that can be either too sweet or over-the-top savory – not a whole lot of spice going on. For some thoughts on adding a touch of heat, Francis Lam talked about and tasted Indian-spiced dishes with Chef Vikram Sunderam and David Hagedorn. Sunderam is the James Beard Award-winning chef at the world-famous Indian Rasika restaurant in Washington, DC.

Simple steps for making hard cider at home

Nov 17, 2017

In recent years, hard ciders have become easy to find with more brands making their way to the shelves of bottle shops and liquor stores. As it turns out, fermenting cider at home is a fairly easy process. Once you learn the basics, you can create all sorts of variations that include spices, fruits and other juices. Contributor Melissa Clark talked with Emma Christensen, author of the new book, Modern Cider.

Not everyone loves pumpkin pie for dessert at Thanksgiving. So our friends at America's Test Kitchen came to the rescue with an amazing recipe for Pennsylvania Dutch Apple Pie. Managing Producer Sally Swift talked with Tucker Shaw, editor-in-chief for Cook's Country, about the ingredients used to make this seasonal treat: apples, steusel topping, and -- most importantly -- melted vanilla ice cream. Yes, you heard that right - melted ice cream!

Mark Bittman's Minimalist Thanksgiving

Nov 9, 2017
James Pauls / iStock / Thinkstock

The author of How to Cook Everything streamlines the holiday feast.

Last Thanksgiving, I vowed to minimize everything: time, number of ingredients and, most of all, work. Heretical as it may seem, I thought it might be fun for the cook to have enough energy to actually enjoy the meal for a change. My idea was to buy all the food in one trip and prepare the entire feast in the time it took to roast my 15-pound turkey - roughly three hours. And, with one minor exception, I was successful.

Chef Sean Sherman - who also goes by the name The Sioux Chef - has made a name for himself in the Upper Midwest by sourcing and cooking with ingredients originally used by Native American groups across the region. The result is an eye-opening and healthy take on modern cuisine. However, his interests are not limited to the native peoples of the Midwest.

How many times have you heard a mushroom described as “meaty?” It's true that mushrooms, such as portobellos, are juicy, have a bit of chew, and reveal a world of umami. But Liz O'Keefe wants us to think beyond the meatiness of mushrooms, and to consider their many other flavors and aroma attributes. She says they can be naturally fruity like apricots, taste similar to coconut, or give off the scent of cinnamon when seared.

Dorie Greenspan's lifelong love affair with butter

Nov 3, 2017

Dorie Greenspan loves butter and how it tastes in the food that we cook and bake with it. She shares her expertise on the topic in the new Short Stack Editions Vol. 30: Butter. She talked with contributor Shauna Sever about how different varieties of butter can be used to achieve specific flavors and textures.

America's Test Kitchen: In defense of pumpkin pie spice

Nov 3, 2017

Fall is the season for pumpkin pie spice versions of just about everything - coffee, cereal, candy. In home kitchens, store-bought spice blends are used in desserts, pies, and pastries.

After years of suffering from a bad reputation, Brussels sprouts have managed to become the new rock star of the veggie world. It seems you can't open a menu at a restaurant without finding them featured as a side or a full main dish. And most of the time, they are delicious. Managing Producer Sally Swift wanted to learn how to make crisp-tender restaurant-style Brussels sprouts at home. So, she turned to Dan Souza, the friendly on-screen test cook and science expert from America's Test Kitchen. He shared his secrets to making perfect Brussels sprouts in just 10 minutes.

Excerpt from Oysters: A Love Story

Oct 20, 2017

Excerpt from Tejal Rao's article, "Oysters: A Love Story," originally printed in the Eat column of The New York Times Magazine. Read the full article here.

The Key 3: Gail Simmons

Oct 20, 2017

For more than 10 years, Gail Simmons has decided the fate of hopeful chefs from all over the country as a judge on the show, Top Chef. She's also the author of the new cookbook, Bringing It Home. We asked Simmons to be part of our Key 3 series, in which we ask chefs, food writers, and celebrities to tell us about their three most go-to dishes. She told us about two of her favorites, chicken wings and butterscotch pudding.

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