KGOU

World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

Ways to Connect

 

As an oil-rich country on the border of Southeast Europe, Asia and the Middle East, Azerbaijan has drawn from a variety of cultures and influences.

Azerbaijan is the only country to border both Iran and Russia. Other neighbors include Georgia, Turkey and Armenia.

Its location makes it a cross roads.

 

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the attack in London, the ban of electronic devices on flights from several countries in the Middle East and North Africa, and the impeachment of South Korea's president.

Then, Joshua Landis interviews Azerbaijan's ambassador to the United States, Elin Suleymanov.

A demonstration of workers from the Putilov plant in Petrograd (modern day St. Peterburg), Russia, during the February Revolution.
State museum of political history of Russia

 

Women played a central role in the Russian Revolution, but their importance was largely erased from history after the Bolsheviks took power.

Historian Rochelle Ruthchild wants to change that.

“Women went out on the streets to for International Women's Day to demonstrate. And that actually sparked the Russian Revolution which led to the toppling of Tsar Nicholas II,” Ruthchild told KGOU’s World Views.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the outcomes of the Dutch elections, and a food poisoning case that has sickened thousands of children in Egypt.

Then, Rebecca interviews historian Rochelle Ruthchild about the women’s movement in Russia and the Soviet Union. Ruthchild wrote the book Equality and Revolution: Women’s Rights in the Russian Empire, 1905-1917. She’s also a member of The 888 Women’s History Project, which recently produced the documentary film Left On Pearl about the 1971 International Women’s Day March in Boston.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about International Women's Day and protests that occurred around the world, Nike's new advertisement featuring athletic wear for Muslim women, and the second version of President Trump's travel ban.

Then, Suzette talks with filmmaker Luis Argueta about his documentary films about the immigration raid in Postville, Iowa. 

Maya Media

 

An immigration raid at a slaughterhouse and meat-processing plant in Postville, Iowa in 2008 launched a Guatemalan-American filmmaker’s career in an entirely new direction.

When Luis Argueta heard about the raid in Postville, he went to investigate.

“What I thought would be a four day trip has turned into eight years,” Argueta told KGOU’s World Views.

His experience in Postville transformed during that time into three documentaries that tell the story of the small farm town and the immigrants that call it home.

Suzette Grillot talks to Joshua Landis about the latest in Syria.

Then, Suzette interviews Andrew Horton about his new documentary Laughter Without Borders. The film tells the story of clowns who visit children in stressed environments, like refugee camps.

Jan Damm, left; Sabine Choucair, center; and Kolleen Kintz, back perform in Greece for Clowns Without Borders.
Clowns Without Borders

 

 

Andrew Horton believes the best way to understand a country’s people is to learn what makes them laugh.

“Laughter crosses borders,” he says.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talks about nominees in the Best Foreign Language films category at the 2017 Oscars.

Then, Joshua Landis discusses Iran with Narges Bajoghli, an anthropologist and filmmaker. She’s a researcher in International Public Affairs at the Watson Institute at Brown University.

Narges Bajoghli

 

 

The Iranian regime faces a daunting puzzle: How to translate the ideals of the 1979 revolution to a new generation.

That question launched Narges Bajoghli into her research in Iran, which focuses on pro-revolution communication.

“In Iran this is an important question because over 75 percent of the population is under the age of 35, meaning they don't remember the revolution,” Bajoghli said.

Nadim Shehadi

 

During the 20th century, countries in the Middle East developed strong, nationalist states that created a homogenous model for their societies. Lebanon, however, did not follow suit. As Middle East expert Nadim Shehadi likes to say, Lebanon skipped the 20th century altogether.

World Views: February 17, 2017

Feb 17, 2017

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis talk about the future of the two-state solution in Israel.

Then Suzette speaks with Nadim Shehadi, director of the Fares Center for Easter Mediterranean Studies at Tufts University. They discuss Lebanon's relative stability in a region that is engulfed in conflict.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about ongoing protests in Romania.

Then, Suzette interviews Orville Schell about China's relationship with the world. Schell is an award-winning journalist and former dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at University of California-Berkeley.

Schell: U.S. And Chinese Cooperation Essential For The World

Feb 10, 2017
Orvville Schell
The Asia Society

 

As a college student, China was something of a forbidden land for Orville Schell. He was mystified by the Chinese language, but found it difficult to find a good language course in the United States.

“It was a bit of a terra incognita,” Schell said. “I think the very fact that I couldn't go there was most interesting to me.”

An informal settlement in Zambia, taken during John Harris' 2014 trip.
David Boeck

 

Urbanization is rapidly expanding on a global scale, and it is creating a demand for reorganization of cities and spaces. Urban and regional planners, like John Harris, weigh the different needs of societies to ensure the city suits the people who live in it. Harris focuses on sustainable urbanization, especially in Africa where he has dealt with informal settlements.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about President Trump's executive order that pauses the resettlement of refugees in the United States and bans travel from seven Muslim-majority countries.

Then, Suzette talks with John Harris about sustainable development and informal communities in Africa.

World Views: January 27, 2017

Jan 27, 2017

Suzette Grillot and Rebeccca Cruise talk about sexist dress codes in Britain, and Russia’s attempts to weaken domestic abuse laws.

Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, center, with court security guards at left and right, appears before the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Tuesday July 3, 2001.
AP

 

Ellen Elias-Bursac, current standing Vice President for the American Literary Translation Association and former revision expert for the Yugoslav War Crimes Tribunal, has helped ease the challenges created by language barriers. During her time at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, Elias-Bursac was given the responsibility of translating and verifying evidence during the war crime trials.

Suzette Grillot talks to Rebecca Cruise about British Prime Minister Theresa May's speech outlining Brexit. And as we continue our month-long series on international literature, Suzette talks to University of Toronto literature professor Dragana Obradovic about experiencing war as a child.

Dragana Obradovic, left, with her colleague Christina Kramer
University of Toronto

 

War broke out in the former Yugoslavia when Dragana Obradovic was only eight years old. Her family fled the region as refugees. By the time she was in her 20s, she felt a void about her childhood in the Balkans: She was old enough to remember the war, but too young to grasp its significance. Obradovic began asking questions about her own identity.

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