KGOU

World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

Ways to Connect

World Views: December 9, 2016

Dec 9, 2016

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis talk about the expected victory by Syrian forces in Aleppo, and what that could mean for the opposition and U.S. interests in the region.

Then Suzette talks with University of Nebraska-Omaha political scientist Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado about the future of U.S.-Cuba relations under a Trump administration.

Russian and Syrian army soldiers gather at the last checkpoint before the front line with rebels, in Karam al-Tarab, east of Aleppo, Syria, Sunday, December 4.
Hassan Ammar / AP

Syrian forces have now seized control of more than half of the territory in Aleppo once held by rebels who opposite President Bashar al-Assad, and supporters of the Assad regime expect victory in the country’s largest city. It’s a crushing blow to the opposition, and could trigger a domino effect as rebels retreat to more rural areas of Syria. “Most of the moderate militias that the United States had been arming and training are situated in Aleppo. Once Aleppo falls, the center of gravity for...

Two passengers deplane from JetBlue flight 387 waving a United States, and Cuban national flag, in Santa Clara, Cuba, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016.
Ramon Espinosa / AP

Since President Obama took office nearly eight years ago, relations between the United States and Cuba have slowly normalized. Following the election of Donald Trump , however, some Americans and Cubans now feel uncertain about their countries’ foreign policy futures. “My expectation is the Trump administration is going to completely roll back most, if not all, of the changes that were made by President Obama,” University of Nebraska-Omaha professor and foreign policy expert Jonathan Benjamin...

In this Thursday Jan. 7, 2016 photo, an elderly woman drinks water from a bucket after waiting for hours for the municipality to deliver free water, in Senekal, South Africa.
Denis Farrell / AP

As resource distribution issues grow increasingly global, so do the organizations dedicated to solving them. From the Wounded Warrior Project to Water for People, Ned Breslin has used his experience to transform how nongovernmental organizations approach issues of water and sanitation in Africa, Asia and Latin America. https://vimeo.com/48926241 Breslin , who now leads Colorado’s Tennyson Center for Children , was introduced to water and sanitation issues during his time as a student at St....

World Views: December 2, 2016

Dec 2, 2016

University of Nebraska political scientist Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado joins Suzette Grillot to discuss the legacy of Fidel Castro, who died November 25. Then Suzette talks with Ned Breslin about the 20 years he spent in Africa working on water and sanitation issues.

Then-Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally organized by Tea Party Patriots on Capitol Hill, Sept. 9,2015, to oppose the Iran nuclear agreement.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

Unusual, unpredictable and inescapable in US media coverage, the American presidential election also dominated news outlets across the globe. For the first time in history, Iran aired U.S. presidential debates , underscoring Iran’s prominence in U.S foreign policy. While contemporary analyses — especially in the wake of President-elect Donald Trump’s rise — often paint Iran as an enemy, the University of South Florida’s Mohsen Milani is quick to point out Iran’s pre-1979 amity with the United...

World Views: November 18, 2016

Nov 18, 2016

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis discuss the escalating tension in Egypt over the country's perilous economic situation, a crackdown on dissent, and its increasingly fraught relationship with Saudi Arabia. Then Grillot talks with University of Virginia civil and environmental engineer Jim Smith . He's the founder of the non-profit organization that works to provide clean water and sanitation technology to developing parts of South Africa.

Volunteers from the Kheir Zaman local supermarket sell a kilogram of sugar for 7.50 L.E. (0.84 US cents), in the Sayeda Zeinab neighborhood of Cairo, Egypt - October 26, 2016.
Nariman El-Mofty / AP

A week ago the International Monetary Fund approved a $12 billion loan to Egypt as the country slips into a perilous economic situation created by a declining currency, food shortages, and a strained relationship with a chief benefactor – Saudi Arabia. “What we’re seeing from one end of the Middle East to the other is no money,” said Joshua Landis, the director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma. “You look at the spreadsheet for Egypt, and everything is moving...

Workers mold clay pots as part of PureMadi's water filtration efforts in South Africa.
Jim Smith / PureMadi

Since 2000, access to safe and reliable drinking water has catapulted into public awareness thanks to the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals . Amidst a proliferation of non-governmental organizations, charities and UN initiatives, the search for truly sustainable solutions to water access and cleanliness has intensified. University of Virginia civil and environmental engineer Jim Smith may have found a solution. Smith, a 2015 Edlich-Henderson Innovator of the Year Award winner , is...

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the international reaction to Tuesday’s election of Donald Trump as the 45 th president of the United States. Then Rebecca talks with Mexican author Nadia Villafuerte’s Her work focuses on the difficulties Central American migrants face coming across Mexico’s southern border. They'll also discuss women's and gender issues and access to education.

Nadia Villafuerte
Oscar Garcia

Born in Chiapas, Mexico, author Nadia Villafuerte has traveled across continents to share her research and vision with a wide range of audiences. In her three solo-authored books, Barcos en Houston , ¿Te gusta el latex, cielo? and Por el lado salvaje, Villafuerte has used her personal and academic knowledge of Mexico’s lesser-discussed southern border to frame her stories. “The southern border is interesting because it's a porous border … It’s not as visible as the northern border, which, for...

World Views: November 4, 2016

Nov 4, 2016

University of Oklahoma Vice President for Weather and Climate Programs, College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences Dean, and National Weather Center director Berrien Moore talks with Suzette Grillot about his involvement with last year’s Paris Climate Conference, and some of the domestic politics surrounding climate change. But first, Joshua Landis provides an update on the Middle East, including the latest on the fight against ISIS in the Iraqi city of Mosul.

Participants attend a panel entitled "Science on a Sphere Presentation"at the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, north of Paris, Dec. 8, 2015.
Michel Euler / AP

Between Nov. 30 and Dec. 12, 2015, 19,385 national delegates from across the world met in Paris for COP21 to discuss rising emissions, green energy, and the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). COP21’s observers included a familiar face from the National Weather Center : Berrien Moore III , Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences. “What came out of Paris was a set of voluntary targets. Unfortunately, if you took all...

World Views: October 28, 2016

Oct 28, 2016

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the refugee and migrant camp near Calais, France known as “The Jungle,” and this year’s record number of refugee deaths in the Mediterranean. Then Rebecca talks with University of Texas at Dallas political scientist Paul Diehl . His latest book explores the evolution of peace in the international system, and they’ll also examine the politics of global governance.

An October 13 UN Security Council meeting on the threat to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts. The Council considered the third report of the Secretary-General on the threat posed by ISIS to international peace and security.
Rick Bajornas / United Nations

Raised in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, today’s college students have never meaningfully related to a global security climate that predates ongoing tensions in the Middle East. In a world where constant armed conflict has become a permanent part of collective memory, current events often influence conceptualization of peace as well. “I think that most people think of peace as the absence of war, and when they talk about peace agreements, and...

Pages