KGOU

World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

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Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss obesity and processed foods in the developing world.

Then, Suzette talks with University of Oklahoma political scientist Charlie Kenney about the political and social conditions that led to the death of Oklahoma priest Stanley Rother in Guatemala in 1981.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the ongoing humanitarian crisis regarding the Rohingya in Myanmar, and Turkey's missile deal with Russia.

Then, Suzette talks with Gershon Lewental about corruption investigations into the family and associates of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attends the weekly cabinet meeting in Jerusalem Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017.
Ronen Zvulun / Pool Photo via AP

Allegations of corruption are circling Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, his family and inner circle. While Netanyahu has not been indicted yet, many of his close friends, colleagues and family have been ensnared in the investigations.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss Canada's offer to accept DACA recipients, and the relationship between the United States and China.

Then, Suzette talks with Bansari Mehta about World Experiences Foundation. The organization holds its annual gala and awards ceremony on September 9.

Bansari Mehta
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

When Bansari Mehta first left India to pursue a master’s degree in Oklahoma, she was surprised by how often she was asked to point to her home country on the map.

“Those were the days that I realized that there is something that’s missing,” Bansari told KGOU’s World Views. “As lovely as the people of Oklahoma are, they did not have much of a broader understanding about things outside of the state or outside of the country.”

Ostriches are seen at a farm in the Cerrado ecosystem, outskirts of Brasilia, Brazil, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2011.
Eraldo Peres / AP

The Central Brazilian state of Goiás is home to a diverse ecosystem known as the Cerrado, which can be understood as the Brazilian savanna. The area is massive, encompassing around 2 million square kilometers, and is home to 44 species that can be found nowhere else on earth.

Around the world, fire management is often used for the purpose of disturbing ecosystems, such the Cerrado, in such a way that it can increase the diversification of species. But in Brazil, the concept of fire management is not well developed in policy. 

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss historic flooding in south Asia and the corruption investigation into Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales.

Then, Suzette, talks with plant ecologist Lara Souza about climate change and fire on Brazil's savanna.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss this week's elections in Angola and upcoming elections in Cambodia.

Then, Suzette talks with Katerina Tsetsura about the ongoing conflict in Ukraine and civil society engagement.

Ukrainian government army soldiers examine weapons captured from rebels in the city of Slovyansk, Donetsk Region, eastern Ukraine Saturday, July 5, 2014.
Dmitry Lovetsky / AP

Conflict and suffering continue in Ukraine as pro-Russian forces in eastern regions of the country continue to fight with Ukrainian soldiers. The violence dates back to 2014, when Russia annexed Crimea and supported separatists in eastern Ukraine. Despite the ongoing hostilities, a small group of activists is working to build civil society in the country.

World Views: August 18, 2017

Aug 21, 2017

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the 70th anniversary of the partition of India and Pakistan.

Then, Rebecca talks with photojournalist Randy Goodman about her exhibit of photographs, Iran: Women Only.

This 1983 photograph shows hundreds of Iranian women at prayer in Tehran, with female Revolutionary Guard members watching on.
Randy Goodman

In 1980, a colleague approached Randy Goodman with an opportunity: Would she like to travel to Iran as a photographer as part of a delegation?

Months earlier, Iranian university students stormed the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. The incident sparked the Iran Hostage Crisis, in which 52 American diplomats and citizens were taken hostage for 444 days. Goodman’s delegation would meet the people who were holding the hostages.

“How phenomenal an opportunity is that? And what experience for on-the-job training,” Goodman said.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the alleged "acoustic attack" against U.S. diplomats in Cuba, as well as tensions between Poland and the European Union.

Then, Rebecca talks with Brazilian sociologist Biance Freire-Medeiros about favela tourism.

A hilly road in Rocinha.
chensiyuan / Wikimedia Commons

While beach-side resorts and events such as Carnival have long made Rio de Janeiro a hot spot for international tourism, in recent years more and more visitors are venturing outside the glamor of Rio’s wealthy Zona Sul region to explore Brazil’s sprawling slums, known as favelas.

World Views: August 4, 2017

Aug 4, 2017

First, Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise will discuss upcoming elections in Kenya, and a recent report of state preparations to face a global pandemic.

Then, Suzette talks with Charlie Kenney about the ongoing political and economic turmoil in Venezuela.

An anti-government demonstrator cries during a vigil in honor of those who have been killed during clashes between security forces and demonstrators in Caracas, Venezuela, Monday, July 31, 2017.
Ariana Cubillos / AP

Tension continues to grow in Venezuela this week after the government held elections over the weekend to elect a constituent assembly that can rewrite the country’s constitution. President Nicolás Maduro plans to move forward with 545-member body that is loyal to him. Opposition parties boycotted the election, calling it unconstitutional.

Suzette Grillot talks with Charlie Kenney about this weekend's election in Venezuela.

Then, Suzette continues her conversation with Juan Cole about historical factors that shape the modern Middle East.

In this photo taken Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014, textile workers strike to demand a minimum wage, the removal of their company's head and the head of the firm's holding company, and back pay of yearly bonuses in Mahalla al-Kobra, Egypt.
Sabry Khaled / AP Photo / El Shorouk Newspaper

Though violence related to religion and sectarian identity exists in the Middle East, there are other areas of conflict in the region that are often misunderstood or underreported.

Juan Cole, a historian at the University of Michigan who writes on the blog Informed Comment, says labor issues in Egypt, for instance, have produced some of the biggest conflicts in that country over the past two decades.

School children attend the first day of classes at the Talaat Harb government primary school, in the popular district of Shubra, Cairo, Egypt, Monday Sept. 28, 2015.
Mohamed Elraai / AP

Rapid population growth is a major catalyst for many of the issues currently facing the Middle East.

Juan Cole, a commenter on the Middle East and a historian at the University Michigan, says the demographic bulge has implications on a number of things, such as unemployment and infrastructure. The large number of young people also puts a strain on education.

Suzette Grillot talks with Joshua Landis about the Trump administration's plan to end covert support for the anti-Assad rebels in Syria.

Then, Suzette begins a two-part series of discussions with historian Juan Cole about the causes of conflict in the Middle East.

In this May 16, 2013 file photo, Chinese demonstrators hold banners as they participate in a protest against a planned refinery project in downtown Kunming, in southwestern China's Yunnan province.
Aritz Parra / AP

China’s environmental movement is one of the few areas in which Chinese citizens can generally speak their mind, according to documentary filmmaker and journalist Gary Marcuse.

Marcuse, whose documentary Waking the Green Tiger explores the demonstrations that blocked a dam project in the Tiger Leaping Gorge, says there are between 50,000 and 100,000 environmental demonstrations every year in China. Many citizens protest the country’s high levels of smog and other environmental issues.

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