World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

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Joshua Landis provides an update on two stories he's following in the Middle East: the different reactions to the nuclear deal with Iran, and news that Syrian soldiers trained and equipped by the U.S. in Turkey were captured and killed as they crossed the border into Syria.

Then Suzette talks with Joe Masco, an anthropologist at the University of Chicago who studies the evolution of the national security state. His latest book traces surveillance and privacy issues from the start of the Cold War to what he now calls the “post-privacy era.”

Surveillance in New York City's financial district.
Jonathan McIntosh / Flickr

It’s been just over two years since former national security contractor Edward Snowden leaked hundreds of thousands of intelligence files and radically transformed the debate about digital surveillance.

President Barack Obama talks on the phone in the Oval Office with Secretary of State John Kerry to thank him for his work with the negotiations on the nuclear agreement with Iran, July 13, 2015.
Pete Souza / The White House

After years of negotiation designed to stop Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon and keep the balance of power from shifting in the Middle East, Congress will vote on a nuclear agreement with the Islamic Republic next month.

Today on the program, Suzette Grillot speaks with Georgia Tech political scientist Jarrod Hayes about how common identities influence international politics.

But first, Rebecca Cruise discusses this week’s bombing in Thailand, and Thursday’s announcement by Greek Prime Minister Alexisi Tsipras that he’s resigning and calling snap elections.

United States President Barack Obama meets with Stephen Harper in Ottawa.
Pete Souza / The White House

In the international arena, social dynamics and shared identities are as important in shaping relationships as they are among individuals.

“We can think about identities as shared systems of meaning that we use to interpret the world because the world is very chaotic, very messy,” says Georgia Institute of Technology political scientist Jarrod Hayes.

These shared systems of meaning are not only important in how we interact on an individual level, but also have a significant impact in international relations.

T'ien-wen Chu's work 'Notes of a Desolate Man'
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Taiwan’s past is complicated, and with that comes a fraught linguistic history.

Dutch settlers colonized the small island nestled between the South and East China Seas during the 17th century, but its former name Formosa actually means “beautiful island” in Portuguese. Just a few decades letter, China’s Qing Dynasty drove European colonists from Taiwan and controlled it for the next two centuries, until they lost control of the island during the war with the Japanese in 1905.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the problem of shipping hazardous material in light of the Chinese port explosion, Amnesty International’s announcement that they want to see the sex trade decriminalized, and the African continent's first full year without a polio case.

Then, Suzette talks with Taiwanese author T’ien-Wen Chu. She won the University of Oklahoma's Newman Prize for Chinese Literature for her collection of short stories that intimately draws the reader into the text, and chronicles Taiwan's fraught linguistic past.

The memorial in Nagasaki, Japan marking the location of ground zero of the August 9, 1945 nuclear attack.
Dean S. Pemberton / Wikimedia Commons

Seventy years ago Thursday, the United States dropped the first of two atomic bombs on the Empire of Japan – the opening salvo to the final days of World War II. The attack on Hiroshima, and Nagasaki three days later, killed as many as 200,000 people, and remain the only times nuclear weapons have ever been used against another nation.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss efforts to control the proliferation of nuclear weapons during and after the Cold War as the world marks 70 years since the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Then Suzette talks with Greek filmmaker Vassilis Loules, who uses the medium to show how hope persists through the past’s darkest times. His documentary Kisses to the Children tells the stories of five Greek Jewish children who survived the Holocaust.

Nearly 20 years ago, documentary filmmaker Vassilis Loules visited the Jewish Museum in Athens, where he was moved by seeing objects from Greek Jewish children hidden during the Holocaust.

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