KGOU

World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

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Rebecca Cruise talks with Paul Worley from Western Carolina University about the first indigenous woman to run for president of Mexico.

Then, Suzette Grillot interviews Ted Henken about entrepreneurs in Cuba.

A private entrepreneur who sells house and kitchen supplies waits for customers at his home in Havana, Cuba, Tuesday, May 24, 2016.
Desmond Boylan / AP

Ted Henken was visiting the Cuban beach resort of Varadero, looking for a place to stay. He asked a waiter if for accommodation suggestions. During the waiter’s smoke break, he took Henken to five bed and breakfasts within 15 minutes.

Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis talks about the diplomatic falling out between Qatar its neighbors, and the recent terrorist attack in Iran.

And Suzette Grillot speaks with Laura Murray-Kolb about the effects of iron deficiency on children and mothers.

Suzette Grillot talks to Rebecca Cruise about Taiwan's same-sex marriage ruling. They also discuss Turkey's cancelation of Oklahoma City Thunder player Enes Kanter's passport, and what it means to be stateless.  Then, Suzette interviews Michael Georgieff, a professor pediatrics and child psychology at the University of Minnesota. Much of his work focuses on iron deficiency in the brains of young children. 

In this Feb. 10, 2017 photo, nurses take care of a newborn baby in Bangkok, Thailand. The Thai government is distributing prenatal vitamins containing folic acid and iron to women between the ages of 20-34.
Sakchai Lalit / AP

Research into micronutrients is beginning to show how deficiencies can impact neuropsychological functioning through the life of a patient.

Historically, studies of a shortage of macronutrients, like protein, have shown an association with a lack of cognitive ability. However, until relatively recently, there was little research into how micronutrient deficiencies impact the brain, according to Laura Murray-Kolb, a nutritional scientist at Penn State University.

Children eat a meal at an orphanage.
Marina Kroupina / Center for Neurobehavioral Development, University of Minnesota

Making sure people across the globe have access to proper nutrition is a goal of international organizations like UNICEF and the World Health Organization.

But sometimes, simply acquiring the right nutrients isn’t enough, especially if outside factors get in the way of allowing the body to process nutrients correctly.

World Views: May 26, 2017

May 26, 2017

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis discuss President Trump's trip to the Middle East and what it means for U.S. foreign policy.

Then, Suzette talks with RC Davis about his new book, Mestizos Come Home!: Making and Claiming Mexican American Identity.

RC Davis is the executive director of World Literature Today at the University of Oklahoma and the author of "Mestizoes Come Home!: Making and Claiming Mexican American Identity."
University of Oklahoma

Starting in the 1960s, the Mexican-American community began a period of reawakening.

In his new book, Mestizos Come Home! Making and Claiming Mexican American Identity, RC Davis explores how this community took hold of its past and cultural identity.

“They said we are going to embrace our culture and we're going to learn our history, we're going to share history with others. We're going to invite people in to learn about our culture. So it was a very deliberate act of cultural recovery,” Davis told KGOU’s World Views.

From Rio de Janeiro, Suzette Grillot and Erika Robb Larkins talk about allegations of corruption against Brazilian president Michel Temer.

Then, Rebecca Cruise talks with World Neighbors regional director Srijana Karki about women and development in Nepal and India.

A community leader presents her group's work in Amouja village in Bihar, India.
Srijana Karki / World Neighbors

In order to reduce poverty and introduce community development, oftentimes it’s best to start with women.

That’s the approach taken by Oklahoma City-based non-governmental organization World Neighbors in its work in Nepal and India. World Neighbors currently works in about 20 villages in Bihar, India and in nearly 32 communities over five districts in Nepal.

The three main areas of work are sustainable agriculture and rural livelihood, community-based natural resource management, and reproductive health and gender equity.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about upcoming elections in Iran.

Then, Rebecca speaks with Volodymyr Dutovyk about the ongoing conflict in Ukraine.

Jacob McCleland / KGOU

 

Ukraine has been in conflict since 2014, when President Viktor Yanukovych fled the country, and Russian troops annexed the Crimea region. Fighting has been off-and-on ever since, with Russian-armed separatists in the eastern Ukraine region of Donbass fighting against pro-government forces. The Council on Foreign Relations estimates over 9,600 people have been killed in the violence, and 1.1 million Ukrainians have become migrants or refugees.

Suzette Grillot speaks to Rebecca Cruise about the ongoing civil unrest in Venezuela. They also discuss U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson's explanation of the Trump administration's "America first" foreign policy.

Then, Rebecca speaks with scholar Reinhard Heinisch about the rise of populism in Austria and the rest of Europe.

 

Austria confronted its Nazi past much later than Germany, and one scholar believes that’s why Austria was one of the first European countries to embrace right-wing and populist politics in 1980s and 90s.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss tensions with North Korea, and the upcoming election in France between Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron. 

Then, Suzette talks with geographer David Lopez-Carr about areas of the world that are most vulnerable to climate change.  

Somali refugees wait outside a UNHCR processing center at a refugee camp outside Dadaab, eastern Kenya, on Aug. 5, 2011. Climate change contributed to low rain levels in East Africa in 2011, making global warming one of the causes of Somalia's famine.
Jerome Delay / AP

 

Interactions between humans and the environment is a two-way street. Human actions change the environment, and changes to the environment affect human behavior.

David Lopez-Carr, a geographer a the University of California-Santa Barbara, calls it “human environment dynamics.” He studies how climate change impacts food security, crop production and human health, particularly infant mortality.

 

“Babies and infants are the hardest hit when there is when there are food shortages,” Lopez-Carr told KGOU’s World Views.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the violent demonstrations in Venezuela against the Nicolas Maduro regime, and Australia's new, more stringent tests to earn citizenship.

Then, Suzette will talk with Afghanistan's ambassador to the United States, Hamdullah Mohib, about foreign investment in his country and the role of women in modern Afghan society.

Ambassador Hamdullah Mohib
The Embassy of Afghanistan

 

Like many young Afghans, Ambassador Hamdullah Mohib has lived in a country that has been at war most of his life. Born in 1983, Ambassador Mohib stressed that he and Afghanistan's young population as a whole have benefited from the relative stability brought to the country by the arrival of U.S. troops in 2001. But this stability only came after Afghanistan lurched from monarchy to communism to anarchy and then to extremism and finally to democracy over the decades.

 

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More people want to pursue higher education now in the United States, and more students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds want to go to college or university. Even though a desire to achieve higher education is greater, it has also created enormous problems, according to Temple University education and sociology professor Sara Goldrick-Rab.

Suzette Grillot talks to Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis about recent developments in Syria and how the Trump administration's policy toward Syria and Russia is changing.

Then, Suzette talks to Temple University education and sociology professor Sara Goldrick-Rab about challenges facing higher education.

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