KGOU

World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

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Achy Obejas
Kaloian

Even though Achy Obejas’s family left Cuba when she was very young, the island nation has an enormous influence on her work.

Rebecca Cruise talks to Joshua Landis about the latest developments in Syria.

Then, Suzette Grillot interviews writer, translator and journalist Achy Obejas. They talk about Cuba, literature and why rupture is a major theme of Obejas's work.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about giant lily pads that have reappeared in Paraguay, and how drought is India is affecting world chickpea prices.

In this photo taken Tuesday Aug. 6, 2013, residents of Puros, northern Namibia, stand at the entrance of a shop in the deserted town.
Jerome Delay / AP

Sharing small amounts of money with poor people can help alleviate poverty and spur economic growth.

In his book Give a Man a Fish: Reflections on the New Politics of Distribution, anthropologist James Ferguson focuses on the question of who is owned what. He is particularly interested in the question of what claims poor people have, and the kinds of resources that can be shared with them.

Adnan Mahmutovich
http://www.adnanmahmutovic.com/

Adnan Mahmutovic fled the war-torn former Yugoslavia as a teenager, and settled as a refugee in Sweden. He began working as a care assistant for a man who had suffered a stroke, and the job became his introduction to Swedish life.

Poet Valzhyna Mort reading at the 2015 Neustadt Festival opening night, October 21, 2015.
Tyler Christian / World Literature Today (Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0)

Valzhyna Mort grew up in Belarus as the Soviet Union collapsed, and she’s spent her entire career using poetry to dispel misconceptions and bring her country out of Russia’s shadow.

“A great myth was that it was a really big reading nation, and I don’t know if it was really true, in terms of how much reading was done,” Mort told KGOU’s World Views. “But it’s certainly true that every household had a library. No matter what your parents did, how educated they were, you had a library.”

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the Trump administration's decision to forego its planned appointment of an ambassador to South Korea. They'll also discuss Israel's first use of an anti-boycott law after the singer Lorde canceled her concert there.

EU diplomat Andrea Glorioso
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Retailers and consumers in the European Union face barriers when trying to conduct business online. An effort to implement a digital single market could change that.

The EU’s digital single market, or DSM, plan could improve e-commerce across borders within the union, modernize copyright regulations and improve cybersecurity, among other goals.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss protests in French over Dutch experiments with pulse fishing, and ongoing protests in India over a Bollywood film.

 Then, Rebecca talks with Andrea Glorioso, counsellor for digital economy for the European Union’s delegation to the United States, about the EU's digital single market plans.

Poet Mahtem Shiferraw’s collection of poetry Fuchsia examines personal displacement and nomadism from the perspective of immigrants.

Shiferraw, who grew up in Eritrea and Ethiopia before moving to Los Angeles, says she was inspired by poetry as a child. She attended an Italian school in Ethiopia, where she was immersed in a culture that embraced poetry.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the current political, economic and social environment in Rio de Janeiro. They'll also discuss a recent poll that shows a general decline in support for the United States and President Trump around the world.

Then, Suzette talks with Mahtem Shiferraw. She's a poet who grew up in Eritrea and Ethiopia, whose collection of poetry, Fuchsia, examines concepts of personal displacement and nomadism.

People watch a TV screen showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's New Year's speech, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018.
Ahn Young-joon / AP

Americans tend to be more interested in domestic policy than foreign policy, but they do pay attention and have opinions about international politics.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the lack of birth control in Venezuela, and the first meeting held between North and South Korea in more than two years.

Then, Suzette talks with Jacob Poushter of the Pew Research Center about American public opinion of foreign policy, and the image of the United States in other countries.

Zia Haider Rahman’s debut novel, In the Light of What We Know, covers a broad swath of topics, ranging from friendship, geopolitics, math and science.

The novel opens when an old friend appears at the narrator’s door, and the two men in their early forties have very different stories to tell about their lives.

Suzette Grillot talks with British author Zia Haider Rahman about his novel, In the Light of What We KnowThe book was awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. Rahman has also worked as a human rights lawyer, a banker and an anti-corruption activist.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise close out 2017 with an end-of-year discussion on some of the biggest international news events of the past 12 months. 

Copyright © 2017 KGOU Radio. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to KGOU Radio. Any use requires KGOU's prior permission.

Peruvian farmers talk to a staff member of the aid group World Neighbors about getting a loan to invest in their guinea pig farm.
Julio Moscoso / World Neighbors

The Oklahoma City-based NGO World Neighbors works on a variety of development projects across the world. Lionel Vigil, Regional Director for Latin America and the Caribbean, says the NGO is focused on four components in his region: Sustainable agriculture, clean water, sanitation and savings and credit groups.

Suzette Grillot talks to Jacob McCleland about corruption allegations in Panama and HIV/AIDS rates among indigenous Panamanians.

Then, Suzette talks with World Neighbors' Regional Director for Latin American and Caribbean, about the NGO's development projects.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the plight of journalists around the world and a recent change in indigenous law in Canada that could affect over a million women.

Then, Suzette talks with Charlie Kenney about security and democratization in Mexico.

In this July 2, 2017 photo, Veracruz state police patrol along the waterfront boulevard in Coatzacoalcos, Mexico.
Rebecca Blackwell / AP

The recent surge of violence in Mexico is due to greater competition for territory between drug cartels, according to a University of Oklahoma political scientist.

Charles Kenney told KGOU’s World Views the Mexican government’s war on drug cartels weakened some drug cartels, but others have stepped up to fill the void,  creating violence.

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