World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

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Two major centennial anniversaries took place this week. April 24th marks Genocide Remembrance Day to commemorate the massacre of millions of Armenians by the Ottoman Empire, and Wednesday was the 100th anniversary of the first widespread use of chemical weapons on World War I’s Western front.

Later, Rebecca Cruise talks with Asma Uddin. She started the online magazine Altmuslimah as a forum for issues of gender in Islam, but it resonated across many faiths.

A poison gas attack using gas cylinders in World War I
Tartalizza / Wikimedia Commons

Wednesday marked 100 years since the first widespread use of chemical weapons on the Western Front of World War I.

On April 22, 1915 during the Second Battle of Ypres in Belgium, German troops released hundreds of tons of chlorine gas toward French soldiers, killing thousands within 10 minutes. It was a horrific way to die – many suffocated on their own lungs and were blinded as the acidic compound destroyed moist tissue.

The Armenian Genocide Memorial, better known as Tsitsernakaberd, is Armenia's official memorial to the victims of the genocide.
Rita Willaert / Wikimedia Commons

The world paused Friday to mark the 100th anniversary of the systematic relocation and extermination of Armenians during World War I. The April 24 date signifies the deportation of intellectuals by the Ottoman Turks in 1915.

Authorities rounded up Armenian Christians due to concerns they were allying with Russia during World War I. An estimated 1.5 million people died, but recognizing the tragedy and how exactly to describe it has been controversial ever since.

The Jewish Star of David, Arab- Christian Cross and Crescent on the front of Beit Hagefen Arab-Jewish Center in Haifa.
zeevveez / Flickr

According to a 2013 Gallup poll, 56 percent of adults in the United States said religion was “very important” in their lives, with another 22 percent saying religion was at least “fairly important.”

Jackie Spinner interviews a soldier in Iraq during her time as a Washington Post correspondent.
Provided / Jackie Spinner

In 2003, the Associated Press issued its report on human rights abuses taking place at the U.S.-held Abu Ghraib prison. Jackie Spinner was at the prison a year later to report on the story for The Washington Post when she was nearly kidnapped by Al-Qaeda members.

“It was June 14, 2004. It’s a day I’ll never forget,” Spinner said.

The event inspired the title for her 2006 book about her experiences reporting in Iraq during the war, Tell Them I Didn’t Cry

China is gaining ground in a land dispute with its neighbors - literally. Rebecca Cruise discusses the country’s rapid environmental transformation of an archipelago in the South China Sea.

Then Arun Gandhi, the grandson of legendary Indian civil rights leader Mahatma Gandhi, talks about lessons from his grandfather and applying his family’s legacy to the 21st century.

Satellite images from March 17, 2015 show new structures and construction equipment present on Mischief Reef in the South China Sea
DigitalGlobe/Asia Maritime Transparency Institute / Center for Strategic and International Studies

China is gaining ground in a land dispute with its neighbors – literally.

For decades, China, Vietnam, and the Philippines have fought over an archipelago known as the Spratly Islands.

Arun Gandhi, grandson of Indian civil rights leader Mahatma Gandhi
Provided / arungandhi.net

Mahatma Gandhi preached a philosophy of nonviolence, understanding, and the search for truth. 67 years after Gandhi’s death, his grandson Arun Gandhi continues spreading that message of peace and carries on his legacy.

The younger Gandhi grew up in South Africa under apartheid and faced constant prejudice because of the color of his skin.

Joshua Landis and Suzette Grillot discuss this week’s nuclear negotiations with Iran, and the release of al-Qaeda prisoners in Yemen and air strikes led by a Saudi coalition.

Later, a conversation with the former director of the National Clandestine Service Michael Sulick. The 30-year CIA veteran argues information leaks by people like Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden can cause far more problems than traditional spying ever did.

Michael Sulick, an American intelligence officer who served as Director of the U.S. National Clandestine Service from 2007-2010.
Sofarsogood2012 / Wikimedia Commons

Ukrainian Prime Misnister Arsenily Yatsenyuk said Friday that he thinks Russia might carry out a new offensive in the east of Ukraine, in spite of the ceasefire agreement reached in February.

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