KGOU

american indian cultural center and musem

The unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The City of Oklahoma City decided the fate of the unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum Tuesday morning. The city council unanimously approved an agreement that outlines who will operate and maintain the facility.

The unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City took another step toward finishing the troubled American Indian Cultural Center and Museum.

The exterior of the unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
American Indian Cultural Center And Museum

On Wednesday Oklahoma City received a two-month extension to reach a deal to determine the fate of the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum.

The Oklahoman’s William Crum reports City Manager Jim Couch asked for the additional 60 days after the Chickasaw Nation offered to oversee commercial development, commit money toward completing construction, and guarantee up to $14 million dollars over seven years to pay for operating deficits:

Shoppers look through merchandise at Blue 7 at 7518 N. May Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma continues to recover from last week’s winter weather after an ice storm shut down much of the state over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend. There are still plenty of residual effects, from tens of thousands of power outages through mid-week, and tons of tree debris that will need to be removed over the next month.

Black Friday shopping was already projected to be down for 2015, and the treacherous conditions put even more of a damper on holiday retail sales.

American Indian Cultural Center & Museum

Officials estimate that construction on the planned American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City is still at least two years away from being finished.

An Oklahoma City Council committee on Tuesday also concluded that another year will be needed to install Smithsonian Institution-quality exhibits.

The unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

It's been almost a month since the end of the legislative session, and Oklahoma City leaders are now starting to address one of 2015's more closely-followed bills - the fate of the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.

Oklahoma State Capitol
mrlaugh / Flickr

The 55th Oklahoma Legislature wrapped up its first session a little over two weeks ago on May 22, one week ahead of the constitutionally required deadline to adjourn.

Lawmakers passed bond issues for widely publicized museums in both Oklahoma City and Tulsa. But the $611 million shortfall in the state budget dominated the conversation from January to May, even though details of the $7.1 billion agreement didn't emerge until shortly before the gavel fell. To plug that gap, lawmakers cut most agency budgets by five to seven percent, and also used monies from the state's Rainy Day Fund and state agency revolving accounts.

The exterior of the unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
American Indian Cultural Center And Museum

After Governor Mary Fallin signed legislation authorizing a $25 million bond issue to finish the incomplete American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City, the Native American Cultural and Educational Authority’s board meeting celebrated the event.

The exterior of the unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
American Indian Cultural Center And Museum

The Oklahoma House has passed legislation to complete the unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum and turn it over to the city of Oklahoma City for operation and maintenance.

Without debate, House members voted 58-36 for the measure Monday and sent it to the Senate for consideration.

The exterior of the unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
American Indian Cultural Center And Museum

State lawmakers had a lot of tourism and recreation projects on their plates this week - specifically one museum in Oklahoma City, and another in Tulsa.

American Indian Cultural Center & Museum

An Oklahoma Senate committee has given its approval to a $25 million plan to complete the unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.

The Senate Joint Committee on Appropriations and Budget voted 26-16 Thursday and sent the plan to the full Senate for a vote.

The bill would authorize $25 million in bonds to finish the museum situated on 67 acres along the banks of the Oklahoma River near downtown Oklahoma City.

American Indian Cultural Center & Museum

Oklahoma House Speaker Jeff Hickman is unveiling a plan for a $25 million bond issue to complete a long unfinished Native American museum near downtown Oklahoma City, while a separate proposal has been released for a $25 million museum in Tulsa.

Hickman revealed details of the plan late Monday, while Senate President Pro Tem Brian Bingman introduced a bill for a separate $25 million bond proposal to build the Oklahoma Museum of Popular Culture, or OKPOP, in Tulsa.

The proposed Core to Shore tax increment financing district boundary.
The Journal Record

This week the Oklahoma City Council voted 8-1 to authorize Mayor Mick Cornett explore the idea of creating two new tax increment financing, or TIF, districts in downtown Oklahoma City.

These subsidies for redevelopment and community improvement projects embody the idea of “public-private partnerships” between cities and businesses.

Oklahoma City Councilman Ed Shadid cast the lone “no” vote.

American Indian Cultural Center & Museum

Democratic leaders at the Oklahoma Capitol say they support the completion of the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum near downtown Oklahoma City, but have different ideas on how to pay for it.

House Democratic Leader Scott Inman said at a Wednesday forum sponsored by The Associated Press that his 29-member caucus would support a $40 million bond issue to complete the museum.

American Indian Cultural Center & Museum

The state of Oklahoma wants to become a bigger tourist destination, but its plans to attract visitors with a major museum of Native American culture have remains incomplete because of financial issues.

But Gov. Mary Fallin and project supporters are pushing to salvage the museum, which is projected to draw 225,000 visitors annually.  

After nearly 10 years and $90 million spent, the museum is unfinished and the Legislature is balking at providing another $40 million for the project.

The exterior of the unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
American Indian Cultural Center And Museum

Oklahoma lawmakers are looking at several options to find roughly $40 million in state funding to complete the unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum along the banks of the Oklahoma River southeast of the intersections of Interstates 35 and 40.

Oklahoma Watch’s state Capitol reporter M. Scott Carter attended Monday’s Senate Education Subcommittee on Appropriations hearing packed with lobbyists, lawmakers, state and Oklahoma City officials to gather more information about what officials says would be a “Smithsonian level” facility.

Carter live tweeted the 9:30 a.m. hearing:

American Indian Cultural Center & Museum

The Oklahoma State Senate Education Subcommittee on Appropriations  is scheduled to hold an interim study at 9:30 a.m. Monday to discuss the future of the planned American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.

Construction on the project at the intersection of Interstates 35 and 40 began about seven years ago and approximately $95 million has been spent on the unfinished facility.

Oklahoma Historical Society

A Utah-based genealogy website is partnering with the Oklahoma Historical Society to add more than 3.2 million American Indian records to an online database to make it easier for people to research whether they have Indian blood.

The new data is available to customers beginning Monday at Ancestry.com.

With the addition, the website will have more than 10 million American Indian records, making it the largest collection of its kind.

American Indian Cultural Center & Museum

Time stretches on for the unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum near downtown Oklahoma City. The silvery struts jut up into the sky, the grass grows on the Cahokia-style mound and the river runs past the site, just north of the intersection of Interstates 40 and 35.

The American Indian Cultural Center and Museum near the intersections of I-40 and I-35 in Oklahoma City.
American Indian Cultural Center and Museum

Private donors have given backers of the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum until the end of the month to come up with a plan to keep the project alive.

Pages