Amnesty International

U2 performing on one of their concerts of the 360° tour in Gelsenkirchen, Germany on August 3, 2009.
SteBo / Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Rock music and charity have gone hand-in-hand for decades.

Former Beatle George Harrison organized the Concert for Bangladesh in 1971 to raise money and awareness of genocide after the country’s war for independence. Queen Elizabeth knighted The Boomtown Rats’ front man Bob Geldof for organizing the 1985 Live Aid concerts that spanned two continents, and Willie Nelson, John Mellencamp, and Neil Young followed suit for American family farmers. After 9/11, dozens of groups gathered in Madison Square Garden for 2001’s Concert for New York City.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the problem of shipping hazardous material in light of the Chinese port explosion, Amnesty International’s announcement that they want to see the sex trade decriminalized, and the African continent's first full year without a polio case.

Then, Suzette talks with Taiwanese author T’ien-Wen Chu. She won the University of Oklahoma's Newman Prize for Chinese Literature for her collection of short stories that intimately draws the reader into the text, and chronicles Taiwan's fraught linguistic past.

United States Army / Wikimedia Creative Commons

Amnesty International is urging the U.S. government to drop its most serious charges against an Army private who gave reams of classified documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. 

The London-based human rights organization said Friday that prosecutors at Pfc. Bradley Manning's court-martial haven't proven he aided the enemy. A conviction requires proof that Manning knew the material would be seen by America's enemies on the WikiLeaks website.

Aiding the enemy is the most serious of 21 contested counts. It carries a possible life sentence.