KGOU

Bill Citty

Oklahoma City Police Chief Bill Citty
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma City’s police union, the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 123, is pushing the city’s police department to put more officers on the streets.

Oklahoma City Police Chief Bill Citty
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma City Chief of Police Bill Citty offered his condolences to Dallas police following the deadly attack that killed five officers and injured several others at a peaceful Black Lives Matter demonstration Thursday.

 

Speaking in front of a wall honoring fallen officers at the Oklahoma City Police Department Headquarters, Citty said the department has not received any specific threats ahead of a Black Lives Matter protest in Oklahoma City Sunday evening. 

 

(L-R): Oklahoma Watch executive editor David Fritze, Oklahoma City Ward 7 councilman John Pettis, Jr., and Oklahoma City police chief Bill Citty during Tuesday night's forum at Kamp's 1910 Café.
Patrick Roberts / KGOU

Oklahoma City residents crowded into a café in Midtown last month to discuss police and minority communities.

The event hosted by Oklahoma Watch raised questions about diversity within the police force.

Oklahoma City Ward 7 councilman John Pettis, Jr. spoke to the crowd about everything from the nationwide spike in police shootings to the racial makeup of the city’s police force, where the number of black officers stands at roughly 6 percent. Pettis voiced concerns that number would drop even lower in coming years as minority officers begin to retire.

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Oklahoma City's police chief says new guidelines outlining the types of video footage open for public records will pave the way for the use of body cameras in Oklahoma's largest city.

The new law permits the release of body camera videos but allows certain exemptions. Videos containing death are exempt from release, unless the death was caused by law enforcement.