Boston Marathon

Federal Bureau of Investigation

Lawyers for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev are again drawing parallels between the media coverage of their client's case to the coverage received by Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh in an effort to have the trial moved out of Massachusetts.

In a filing Monday, defense attorneys wrote that because "the crimes charged inflicted actual injury on the entire local population" and "greater Boston, was itself, a victim," the case is similar to the McVeigh case.

McVeigh's 1997 trial was moved to Denver.

This time last week Americans were just starting to learn about the troubled Russian region of Chechnya after authorities released the identities of the two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings.

Rebecca Cruise discusses women in combat and the U.S. drone program with NPR's Rachel Martin. Before taking over the host's chair of Weekend Edition Sunday, she reported from both Iraq and Afghanistan, and served as the network's national security correspondent.

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Russian President Vladimir Putin criticized the West Thursday for refusing to declare Chechen militants terrorists and for offering them political and financial assistance in the past, in light of the revelation that Boston Marathon bombing suspects Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev had Chechen roots.

The U.S. has urged the Kremlin to seek a political settlement in Chechnya and provided humanitarian aid to the region during the two separatist wars that began in 1994.

"Violence and conflict has happened in Chechnya for centuries," University of Oklahoma College of International Studies Dean and KGOU’s World Views host Suzette Grillot says. "This goes back to the 16th Century when there's been war after war after war. So it's been a volatile region for some time."

Police say they've captured Suspect #2 in Monday's bombing at the Boston Marathon.

Since 2001, the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum has held the marathon to commemorate the bombings in that city, which killed 168 people and injured more than 800 others. But given the events at the Boston Marathon, Oklahoma City marathon organizers are cautiously evaluating security plans and making their decisions one day at a time.

Oklahoma Christian University / Flickr

The Oklahoma Highway Patrol says there have been no threats or heightened security in the aftermath of a bombing at the Boston Marathon - but that senses are heightened.

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett says there are currently no plans to call off this year's Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon - but said events will be monitored daily.

"Obviously this time of the year on the calendar is a heightened alert in Oklahoma City. It has been for 18 years," Cornett says, referencing the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building.