KGOU

Brad Henry

Oklahoma Gov. Brad Henry during a FEMA press conference in Oklahoma City following a December 2007 ice storm.
Earl Armstrong / Federal Emergency Management Agency

A dozen Oklahoma attorneys and business leaders are donating their time to independently review Oklahoma’s capital punishment practices. Former Oklahoma Gov. Brad Henry is co-chairing the Oklahoma Death Penalty Review Commission.

“Oklahoma has an opportunity to lead the nation by being the first state to conduct extensive research on its entire death penalty process, beginning with an arrest that could lead to an execution,” Henry said in a press release.

HarperCollins Publishers

In 2007, Gov. Brad Henry signed some of the country’s strictest anti-immigration legislation into law.

House Bill 1804 by state Rep. Randy Terrill (R-Moore) made it a felony for the state to provide education and health care services to illegal immigrants, and requires police to investigate the immigration status of anyone “suspected” of being in this country illegally.

Seven years later, the controversial law and its effect on people form the basis for Oklahoma native Rilla Askew’s fourth novel Kind of Kin, now out in paperback.

State Rep. Al McAffrey at a bill signing with Gov. Brad Henry - September 13, 2009.
Tiddled / Wikimedia Commons

Former Oklahoma Gov. Brad Henry has become a shareholder and been elected director of a CFS2, a Tulsa-based debt collection company.

The company announced in a press release Thursday that Henry's role will be in the strategic and capital planning process.

Henry said in a statement the company focuses on "nontraditional ways to help consumers overcome financial difficulties."

The company was founded in 2010 by Bill Bartmann, who previously founded the debt-collection company Commercial Financial Services.

In 2007, Gov. Brad Henry signed some of the country’s strictest anti-immigration legislation into law.

House Bill 1804 by State Rep. Randy Terrill (R-Moore) made it a felony for the state to provide education and health care services to illegal immigrants, and requires police to investigate the immigration status of anyone “suspected” of being in this country illegally.

Six years later, the controversial law and its effect on people form the basis for Oklahoma native Rilla Askew’s fourth novel Kind of Kin.

“I'm always writing about the coming together and the clash between cultures and races in Oklahoma,” Askew says. “I was disturbed by the notion of a bill like that.”