Bradley Manning

The Two-Way
7:44 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Manning Could Move To Civilian Prison For Hormone Therapy

PVt. Chelsea Manning, formerly named Bradley, was convicted last year of sending classified documents to anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks. In this 2010 photo, Manning was dressed as a woman. The soldier has asked for hormone therapy and to be able to live as a woman.
U.S. Army handout Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 12:25 pm

The Pentagon is working on a prison transfer for convicted WikiLeaks source Pvt. Chelsea Manning, who has requested hormone therapy. The plan would allow Manning to serve time in a civilian prison, where such therapy is available.

Manning's first name was Bradley when the soldier made headlines for sending a trove of classified documents to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks.

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The Two-Way
2:18 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Judge OKs WikiLeaker Manning's Name Change To 'Chelsea'

The soldier formerly known as Bradley Manning was dressed as a woman in this 2010 photograph.
U.S. Army handout Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 1:17 pm

The ex-Army intelligence analyst responsible for the biggest leak of classified material in U.S. history is now officially known as Chelsea Elizabeth Manning.

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The Two-Way
4:03 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Manning Would Pay For Hormone Treatment, Lawyer Says

Army Pvt. Chelsea Manning on Aug. 20 (before her sentencing, demotion from private first class and announcement that she no longer wished to be known as Bradley Manning).
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 11:33 am

Army Pvt. Chelsea Manning is willing to pay for estrogen treatments that would lead to breast development and other female characteristics, the lawyer for the former Bradley Manning tells The Associated Press.

According to the wire service:

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Military
11:26 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Manning Sentencing Set For Wednesday Morning

Army Pfc. Bradley Manning
Credit United States Army / Wikimedia Creative Commons

A military judge says she'll announce on Wednesday the sentence for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, who gave reams of classified information to WikiLeaks.

Army Col. Denise Lind said Tuesday she was still deliberating but would announce the sentence at 10 a.m. Wednesday.

Manning faces up to 90 years in prison, but prosecutors have asked the judge to sentence him to 60 years.

Manning's defense didn't recommend a specific amount of time, but suggested he should spend no more than 25 years in prison.

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The Two-Way
11:43 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Bradley Manning Not Guilty Of 'Aiding The Enemy'

Army Private Bradley Manning, center, leaves the courtroom at Fort Meade, Maryland, on Tuesday.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:47 pm

This post was last updated at 6:42 p.m. ET.

Bradley Manning, the former intelligence analyst who perpetrated the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history, has been acquitted of the most serious charge against him.

Col. Denise Lind, the military judge presiding over the case in Fort Meade, Md., found the Army private not guilty of aiding the enemy, when he released hundreds of thousands of classified documents to WikiLeaks. The charge carried a possible punishment of life in prison.

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Politics and Government
1:11 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Prosecutors: Manning Wanted Attention For Leaks

Credit United States Army / Wikimedia Creative Commons

Prosecutors say U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning betrayed his country's trust and gave military secrets to WikiLeaks to make a name for himself. 

The prosecutors said during closing arguments Thursday in the soldier's court-martial that he knew the sensitive material he leaked would fall into the hands of al-Qaida.

Manning is charged with aiding the enemy, which carries a possible sentence of up to life in prison. His defense attorneys have argued there was no evidence he knew al-Qaida looked specifically at the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks.

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Politics and Government
1:22 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Judge Won't Dismiss Serious Charge In Manning Case

Private First Class Bradley Manning
Credit United States Army / Wikimedia Creative Commons

A military judge is refusing to dismiss a charge that an Army private aided the enemy by giving reams of classified information to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks

Col. Denise Lind ruled Thursday on the defense motion in the court-martial of Pfc. Bradley Manning at Fort Meade, near Baltimore.

It is the most serious charge Manning faces, punishable by up to life in prison without parole. Lind found there was enough prosecution evidence to proceed with the case.

Lind also refused to dismiss a computer fraud count.

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Politics and Government
12:09 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Amnesty International Wants Manning Charges Dropped

Private First Class Bradley Manning
Credit United States Army / Wikimedia Creative Commons

Amnesty International is urging the U.S. government to drop its most serious charges against an Army private who gave reams of classified documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. 

The London-based human rights organization said Friday that prosecutors at Pfc. Bradley Manning's court-martial haven't proven he aided the enemy. A conviction requires proof that Manning knew the material would be seen by America's enemies on the WikiLeaks website.

Aiding the enemy is the most serious of 21 contested counts. It carries a possible life sentence.

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