Chesapeake Energy

A picture of a natural gas extraction site in the shadow of a setting sun.
Chesapeake Energy

The federal government has fined one of the country’s largest energy producers more than $2.1 million for under-reporting natural gas production on Native American leases.

In 2011, the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Office of Natural Resources Revenue issued Chesapeake Energy an order to restructure its accounting practices in order to correct unreported and misreported volumes on land leased by Native American individuals and tribes.

Former Chesapeake Energy employees leave the building with their belongings after the Sept. 29, 2015 buyouts.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

It's been a rocky five days for Oklahoma's energy sector, with downsizing, buyouts, and even a possible de-listing from the New York Stock Exchange.

Chesapeake Energy's Oklahoma City headquarters.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

More than 500 Oklahoma employees of Chesapeake Energy are out of a job following the latest layoffs Sept. 29, as oil prices stay below $50 a barrel. Gasoline is cheap, but that relief at the pump can fuel widespread worry about Oklahoma’s oil and gas-reliant economy.

Chesapeake Energy employees leave buildings after layoffs were reported Sept. 29, 2015
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Updated at 3:22 p.m.

Chesapeake Energy Corporation laid off nearly 15 percent of its total workforce on Tuesday at a time when oil prices remain low.

The Oklahoman newspaper reports that Chesapeake laid off 740 total workers, including 562 in Oklahoma City. Employees will get between 13 and 52 weeks of pay and will continue to receive health insurance and job placement help.

Chesapeake Energy's Oklahoma City campus
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

It's been an interesting year for Chesapeake Energy.

The Oklahoma City-based energy giant is involved in a lawsuit with the company's founder, Aubrey McClendon, over some hazy corporate law issues involving his new company - American Energy Partners.

Guards make their rounds on the eighth floor of the Oklahoma County Jail in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

For the past few months a committee has been looking at how to pay for a new Oklahoma County Jail, and made its recommendation on Tuesday.

The facility is only about 25 years old, but it’s had construction problems, mold, sewage in the cells – to the point where the U.S. Department of Justice stepped in and said the inmates faced violations of their constitutional rights.

American Energy Partners, LP founder and CEO Aubrey McClendon, who co-founded Chesapeake Energy in 1989.
Provided / The Journal Record

One of the country’s major oil and natural gas producers, and a huge driver of Oklahoma City’s and the state’s economy, filed a lawsuit Tuesday alleging its founder and former CEO stole trade secrets during his final days at Chesapeake Energy Corporation.

Aubrey McClendon has been no stranger to the controversy. In 2012 the Chesapeake board of directors significantly curtailed his responsibility, before he eventually stepped down during the first half of 2013.

Chesapeake Energy

A judge has barred a Texas-based attorney from contacting Chesapeake Energy Corp. royalty owners about a proposed $119 million settlement covering the company's natural gas wells in Oklahoma.

The Oklahoman reports that District Judge Jon K. Parsley issued a temporarily restraining order last week against attorney Dan McDonald, citing that his "advertising" campaign would disrupt the time between when the settlement is certified and the expiration period to opt out of or object to the settlement.

The corporate campus of Chesapeake Energy in Oklahoma City.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma City-based Chesapeake Energy Corp. is suing its founder and former CEO Aubrey McClendon and his new company for allegedly taking sensitive trade secrets when he resigned from Chesapeake two years ago.

McClendon and his new company — American Energy Partners — call the allegation meritless and say McClendon left Chesapeake with an agreement that he would receive "extensive" information on land, wells and other matters.

The lawsuit alleges McClendon took "confidential information and trade secrets from Chesapeake."

The corporate campus of Chesapeake Energy in Oklahoma City.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The Michigan attorney general's office says Chesapeake Energy has been ordered to stand trial in a racketeering case that accuses it of leasing land to thwart competitors and then canceling the deals when the competition ended.

A probable cause hearing in the criminal case against the Oklahoma City-based company took place in August in Cheboygan District Court. Attorney General Bill Schuette on Tuesday announced the judge's decision, which had been expected in a written opinion.

The Associated Press sent a message seeking comment from a Chesapeake spokesman.