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Chickasaw Nation

The unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Construction could resume as early as this spring on a long-delayed Native American museum near downtown Oklahoma City.

Even though the work stalled four years ago, the Chickasaw Nation and the City of Oklahoma City have almost resolved the final legal obstacles, The Journal Record's Brian Brus reports:

The SandRidge Energy Inc. logo is seen on a vehicle parked at the company headquarters in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Over the past week or so Oklahoma City’s energy companies have been releasing their quarterly earnings reports, and some of the more interesting numbers came from SandRidge Energy. After the stock market closed Tuesday, the company reported a net loss of $404 million for the quarter.

The crumbling remnants of Texoma State Park buildings that haven't been in use for years.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

A decade after the government-owned Texoma Lodge and Resort was sold to a private company that never fulfilled its promise to develop a multi-million dollar resort on the former state park land, Gov. Mary Fallin and the Chickasaw Nation on Thursday announced the tribe’s plans to build a resort hotel and casino instead.

Remembering Chickasaw Tribal Elder Jerry Imotichey

Oct 17, 2016

Earlier this month Here & Now visited the Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur, Oklahoma — a center not only for culture and history, but also the preservation and revitalization of the critically endangered Chickasaw language.

Among the 30 or so remaining native speakers we met was Jerry Imotichey. He grew up speaking Chickasaw, and called the language and culture his “soul.”

Chickasaw tribal elders Jerry Imotichey (left) and Hannah Pitmon (right) stand with Joshua Hinson (middle), director of the Department of Chickasaw Language, in front of "The Arrival" statue at the Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur, Okla.
Karyn Miller-Medzon / Here & Now

With only 30 or so remaining native Chickasaw speakers — those who learned Chickasaw as a first language — the language has been considered critically endangered. That didn't sit well with Joshua Hinson when his son was born in 2000.

Realizing that his son would be the sixth generation of Chickasaw children to grow up speaking English, he decided to take matters into his own hands.

Chickasaw Nation Gov. Bill Anoatubby discussed water rights, language efforts, and the tribe’s economic development during his annual State of the Nation address Saturday.

He told the crowd gathered in Tishomingo the August agreement between the state, the city of Oklahoma City, and the Chickasaw and Choctaw Nations maintains tribal sovereignty and resolves long-standing issues over water rights and regulatory authority.

Kids from a local youth organization laugh and splash in cold, spring-fed pools at the Chickasaw National Recreation Area near Sulphur, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The National Park Service turns 100 this year, and many states are celebrating top-tier environmental landmarks that are a big source of local pride. About half the U.S. states don’t have a national park — including Oklahoma.

That wasn’t always the case, and the story of what happened illustrates a changing view of what national parks are for.

Grave sites at the Sardis Cemetery go back well into the 19th century and many of them are homemade.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The fight over control of Sardis Lake and water across southeastern Oklahoma pits the state against Native American tribes. To the Choctaw and Chickasaw who live in the area today — and for the Caddo who preceded them — water isn’t just vital to life: It’s culturally sacred.

 

U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell at the Choctaw Nation headquarters in Durant, Okla. on Oct. 6, 2015.
Choctaw Nation

The U.S. Department of the Interior and the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations agreed to a settlement on Tuesday to end long-running litigation regarding a lawsuit filed by the tribes regarding federal handling of tribal resources and funds held in government trust.

Speaking at the ceremonial signing on Tuesday at Choctaw headquarters in Durant, Oklahoma, Bill Anoatubby, Governor of the Chickasaw Nation, said the settlement was a milestone in tribal and federal relations.

Chickasaw Nation Gov. Bill Anoatubby during his 2015 State of the Chickasaw Nation address in Tishomingo on October 3.
Provided / Chickasaw Nation

Chickasaw Nation Gov. Bill Anoatubby says the tribe's assets increased by more than $200 million dollars this fiscal year. Anoatubby delivered his annual State of the Chickasaw Nation address Saturday in Tishomingo, where he highlighted new health care facilities, programs, and services for Chickasaw citizens.

“We had more than 800,000 patient visits to the health system in the last year,” Anoatubby said. “Nearly 1.2 million prescriptions were filled.”

Gallery of the Five Civilized Tribes. The portraits were drawn or painted between 1775 and 1850.
Wikipedia Commons

The Inter-Tribal Council of the Five Civilized Tribes is holding a two-day meeting in Tulsa.

The Muscogee Creek Nation is hosting the Thursday and Friday sessions that includes the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw and Seminole Nations.

Muscogee Creek Nation Principal Chief George Tiger says he's also invited other tribes to attend and that about 400 people are expected.

The quarterly meetings are held to allow tribal officials to discuss ways they can cooperate on issues facing the tribes and to collaborate on projects.

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Cory Moates, owner of Moates Excavating, left, and Tim Kent, environmental director of The Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma, inspect ongoing chat disposal from a site near Quapaw. The pit is the top of a collapsed mine near Picher.
Rip Stell / The Journal Record

Monday The Journal Record published its Tribal Economic Impact issue, a deep dive into how Oklahoma’s federally recognized Native American groups fund their services and contribute to Oklahoma’s economy.

Governor Mary Fallin / Facebook

Gov. Mary Fallin and Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby have announced a compact between the state and the tribe for Chickasaw Nation license plates to members of the tribe. 

The compact says Chickasaw tags will be sold exclusively at state-licensed tag agencies in Oklahoma. Chickasaws who want to purchase the tags will present their Chickasaw Nation citizenship card and pay the same fees and taxes any other Oklahoman for a tag.

Logo for the OU College of Law
College of Law / University of Oklahoma

The University of Oklahoma College of Law has received a gift from the Chickasaw Nation for the Chickasaw Nation Native American Law Chair.

The position is the first endowed chair of its kind in the nation. It will allow OU to attract and retain national scholars in Native American law.

OU Law offers three different programs providing specialization in Native American law: the Juris Doctor Certificate, the Master of Laws and the new Master of Legal Studies.

Chickasaw Nation

The longtime governor of one of the state's most powerful Native American tribes says he has no plans to run for Oklahoma's open U.S. Senate seat this year.

Chickasaw Nation Gov. Bill Anoatubby released a statement Monday that said while he's honored to be mentioned as a potential candidate, he doesn't intend to run. Anoatubby says he hopes to continue in his role as head of the tribe "if it is the will of the Chickasaw people."

Anoatubby has been governor of the tribe since 1987.

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