Common Core

a school classroom with empty chairs
comedy_nose / Flickr Creative Commons

Oklahoma is writing new academic standards in math and English that in some ways go beyond the current standards and the now-repealed Common Core goals, according to a review of initial drafts by Oklahoma Watch.

The drafts show, for example, that elementary-school students would have to write research papers and learn the use and concepts of American currency. High school students would be expected to grasp the “whys” behind math formulas.

AP U.S. History study guides
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Updated 12:20 p.m.

House Speaker Jeff Hickman (R-Fairview) says no decision has been made about whether or not a controversial bill that directs the State Board of Education to adopt a new program to replace the Advanced Placement U.S. history course and test will be heard by the full chamber.

timlewisnm / Flickr Creative Commons

A trio of experts in education standards will deliver presentations to a steering committee responsible for helping develop new academic standards in Oklahoma.

The steering committee was formed after the Legislature repealed Common Core. The hearing is delayed by a few hours due to Monday morning's winter storm.

What do the Common Core State Standards have in common with congressional Democrats and the Chicago Cubs?

They all had a really rough year.

Of the 45 states that first adopted the academic standards, many spent 2014 talking about repeal. In Oklahoma (as well as Indiana and South Carolina), it wasn't just talk. The Legislature voted to drop the Core in May. And Gov. Mary Fallin, a longtime champion of the Common Core, signed the repeal in June.

a school classroom with empty chairs
comedy_nose / Flickr Creative Commons

Oklahoma officials say the federal government will restore the state's flexibility to decide how to use $29 million in public school funding.

The state Board of Education said in a statement that the U.S. Department of Education would announce Monday afternoon it is reinstating a waiver from provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act.

Oklahoma lost its waiver this year after the state dropped Common Core standards and didn't certify that the replacement guidelines made students ready for college or the workplace.

Democratic superintendent canddiate John Cox and Republican nominee Joy Hofmeister during Tuesday's debate at Oklahoma State University-Tulsa.
OStateTV

With just a week before the November 4 general election, Republican Joy Hofmeister and Democrat John Cox set out to differentiate themselves last night in one of the final debates in the race for Oklahoma’s top education office.

PASS Standards "College and Career Ready," But Not Perfect

Oct 30, 2014
timiewisnm / Flickr.com

The process and findings of a review of Priority Academic Student Skills standards by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education and the Southern Regional Education Board was presented Thursday before the Oklahoma Standards Steering Committee, revealing some recommended changes. 

Mark Twain Elementary second grade teacher Elizabeth Clarke staples together work from two of her second-grade students in this 2013 photo. These now-third-graders were the first to face retention if they didn't score at grade level on the state's reading
Chase Cook / Oklahoma Watch

Even if Oklahoma's outdated education standards are determined to properly prepare students for college, state officials say there's little they can do this school year to regain control of federal funding stripped from the state.

Todd Binger / Flickr.com

Even if Oklahoma's outdated education standards are determined to properly prepare students for college, state officials say there's little they can do this school year to regain control of federal funding stripped from the state.

Oklahoma State Department of Education / Facebook

Oklahoma school administrators remain frustrated by the Legislature's decision to repeal rigorous Common Core academic standards for public school students weeks before they were to go into effect.

Their frustration intensified when federal officials denied Oklahoma the authority to decide how to spend millions of federal education dollars. Federal officials said Oklahoma could not demonstrate its current standards help students become college- and-career-ready.

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