Oklahoma Department of Corrections via AP

A prosecutor who negotiated a plea deal for a man convicted of raping a 13-year-old girl has resigned.  


Murray County Assistant District Attorney David Pyle stepped down Wednesday afternoon, according to a release from the Carter County District Attorney’s office.


Michael I Schiller / Reveal

In rural Kentucky, a cold case is reopened after 45 years, and investigators dig up an unidentified murder victim in an attempt to give her back her name. The exhumation leads to a series of unexpected revelations about who she was and why she might have been killed.

Her case speaks to the complexity – and importance – of opening cold cases and using DNA science to try to solve them. There currently are more than 10,000 unidentified men and women in the U.S.

Reveal: Fire And Justice

Dec 26, 2017
In 1988, two powerful explosions shook Kansas City, Missouri, killing six firefighters. Nine years later, five people were convicted of arson and sent to prison for life – but were they innocent?
Gabriel Hongsdusit / Reveal

In 1988, six firefighters in Kansas City, Missouri, were killed in a blast at a highway construction site. Nine years later, five people were convicted of setting the fires that led to their deaths.

Now, almost 30 years later, Reveal investigates problems in the case. There was no physical evidence linking the five to the crime, and their convictions were based on witness testimony – a lot of it conflicting. 

Gabriel Hongsdusit / Reveal

Across the country, criminals are arming themselves in unexpected ways. In Florida, they’re stealing guns from unlocked cars and gun stores. In other places, they’re getting them from the police themselves, as cash-strapped departments sell their used weapons to buy new ones. On this episode of Reveal, we learn where criminals get their guns and what cars can teach us about gun safety.

Guns rest in buckets in the Oklahoma City Police Department's property room. The number of firearms-related deaths in Oklahoma has increased in recent years.
Michael Willmus / Oklahoma Watch

The shootings seem to erupt randomly among states. In Texas, 26 slain. In Nevada, 58. In Florida, 49. In Connecticut, 27. In Virginia, 32.

In Oklahoma, it’s been more than three decades since a gun massacre that seized the nation’s attention – 14 killed at the Edmond post office in 1986.

But massacre counts can be deceiving.

Law enforcement has captured all four inmates who escaped from the Lincoln County Jail early Monday morning. United States Marshals apprehended the final escapee, 23-year-old Brian Allen Moody, in Lincoln County on Thursday.

The other three inmates, 41-year-old Sonny Baker, 31-year-old Jeremy Tyson Irvin and 27-year-old Trey Goodnight were captured on Wednesday morning.

This post was updated on June 15, 2017 at 4:40 p.m.

Original post:

Oklahoma Attorney General's Office

The Oklahoma Attorney General's office has filed charges against the owners of a vanity publishing business for allegedly extorting its customers.  

Attorney General Mike Hunter announced that Richard Tate and his son Ryan Tate, who run Tate Publishing and the Tate Music Group, have been charged with eight felonies and one misdemeanor, including counts of extortion, embezzlement and racketeering.

prison bars
mikecogh / Flickr Creative Commons

The head of an Oklahoma prison workers group says the stabbing deaths of four white inmates at a private prison in Cushing were the result of violence between two white prison gangs that also spilled over into other state prisons.

police sirens
Highway Patrol Images / Flickr

The Oklahoma Department of Corrections says a man on probation who disappeared after disabling his monitoring device has died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound following a police chase through rural Pontotoc County.

Corrections spokeswoman Terri Watkins says 42-year-old Johnnie Lewis Hawkins II apparently shot himself in the head Friday after authorities disabled the stolen vehicle he was driving.

H. Michael Karshis /

The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation says crime is declining in the state.

The newly published OSBI Uniform Crime Report for 2014 shows the murder rate dropped 14 percent in 2014. The reports says the number of murders reported last year — 178 — was the lowest in a 10-year period. Since 2012, murders have declined at a rate of 10.3 percent annually.

Yumi Kimura /

A federal prosecutor says two leaders of a drug trafficking organization have been sentenced to federal prison on a variety of charges, including possession with the intent to distribute 15 kilograms or more of methamphetamine.

U.S. Attorney Danny C. Williams Sr. of Tulsa said Tuesday that sentences were headed down to 36-year-old Samuel Garcia-Escalera and 34-year-old Joel Deloera-Escalera, who were convicted following a five-day jury trial. Garcia-Escalera was sentenced to 25 years in prison, and Deloera-Escalera received more than 11 years.

Yumi Kimura /

Investigators say more than three dozen people have been charged in a North Texas-based drug trafficking ring with ties to Oklahoma.

Federal prosecutors on Friday announced the suspects face charges including conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine.

The indictment says the suspects since 2013 conspired to distribute methamphetamine and used stash houses to store the smuggled drugs.

Authorities say 32 of the 37 suspects have been arrested. All allegedly have ties to various white supremacist groups.

State Sen. Constance Johnson (D-Oklahoma City)
Provided / Oklahoma Senate

Oklahoma's Democratic nominee for the U.S. Senate is a featured speaker in a rally to bring awareness to the state's high incarceration rate and tough criminal code.

The rally to end mass incarceration will be held Thursday at the state Capitol.

Democratic State Sen. Connie Johnson of Oklahoma City is among a group of speakers at the event, which also will include family members of prisoners serving long sentences.

Oklahoma has some of the strictest criminal penalties in the country, particularly for drug crimes.

The nation's crime labs are no strangers to scandal. Last year in Massachusetts, bogus testing by former chemist Annie Dookhan called into question tens of thousands of cases and led to the release of more than 300 people from the state's prisons.