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David Boren

University of Oklahoma President David Boren talks with the media following his announcement that he will resign as head of the state's flagship university at the end of the current school year.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

University of Oklahoma President David Boren has announced his retirement at the end of this academic year.

Boren addressed the university Wednesday afternoon to a packed audience at the Reynolds Performing Arts Center in Holmberg Hall, where he announced he will step down.

University of Oklahoma president David Boren spoke with a small group of reporters on the field Monday night at the Superdome after OU’s Sugar Bowl victory against Auburn.

Storme Jones / KGOU

More than 100 students, faculty, and staff members gathered on the University of Oklahoma's South Oval Wednesday in opposition to an anti-Black Lives Matter and anti-Islamic protest. OU President David Boren ordered the group to leave campus, or face arrest.

A small group of so-called street preachers have come to the campus before. This time, the group took aim at sensitive issues around the country, holding signs reading “BLM Are Racist Thugs” and “Muhammad is the devil.”  

University of Oklahoma president David Boren (left) speaks as Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby looks on during a news conference after The Big 12 Conference meeting in Grapevine, Texas, Monday, Oct. 17, 2016.
LM Otero / AP

After months of speculation and discussion, the Big 12 Conference decided against expansion. The announcement came after Monday’s six-hour meeting with the conference's university presidents and the commissioner.

University of Oklahoma president David Boren is the chairman of the conference's board of directors, and he said the decision was unanimous. 

The Dallas Morning News' SportsDay reporter Chuck Carlton analyzes University of Oklahoma president David Boren's comments Wednesday about the possibility of expanding the athletic conference.

University of Oklahoma president David Boren signs a petition February 16, 2016 for a one cent sales tax proposal to fund education.
Emily Wendler / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

A conservative advocacy group filed a legal challenge with the Oklahoma Supreme Court Thursday against a penny sales tax initiative that would be used to generate more money for Oklahoma’s public education system.

The legal filing by OCPA Impact contends the ballot title for the initiative and an explanatory statement, known as the gist, fail to describe important details, according to The Oklahoman’s Rick Green. It says the 1 percent tax would be in addition to other state sales and use taxes now in place:

University of Oklahoma President David Boren speak to reporters after the second day of the Big 12 sports conference meetings in Irving, Texas, Thursday, June 2, 2016.
LM Otero / AP

The University of Oklahoma Board of Regents has approved a 7 percent tuition and fee increase for Fiscal Year 2017. It’s the largest hike for OU students since 2008.

OU President David Boren said during Tuesday’s Regents meeting that OU operates with $160 million less than it did in 2008, despite a 1,000-1,500 increase in the number of students.

University of Oklahoma president and former governor and U.S. Senator David Boren during a press conference Thursday as his group delivers 300,000 signatures to the Secretary of State's office.
YesFor779 / Twitter

Oklahoma voters will decide whether or not raise sales taxes by a penny to fund education this fall.

State Question 779 will raise about $615 million for $5,000 teacher pay raises, among other education initiatives. University of Oklahoma president David Boren has been leading the charge for the penny sales tax. The grassroots effort Oklahoma’s Children – Our Future had 90 days to get 124,000 petition signatures to get the question on the November ballot. They delivered 300,000 to Secretary of State Chris Benge’s office Thursday – more than a month before the deadline.

University of Oklahoma president David Boren signs a petition February 16, 2016 for a one cent sales tax proposal to fund education.
Emily Wendler / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

The 90-day window for supporters to gather more than 120,000 signatures in support of a sales tax increase for education officially opened Tuesday.

University of Oklahoma president David Boren is leading the drive to put the one cent sales tax on the ballot in November.

“Let the people decide what kind of state that we’re going to have for the future, what kind of state we’re going to have now,” Boren said during Tuesday’s press conference launching the petition.

University of Oklahoma president David Boren
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

University of Oklahoma president David Boren is recommending a 3 percent pay cut for himself, and OU vice presidents and deans for the upcoming fiscal year.

Boren said Monday the administrators affected by the pay cut have asked that the savings be used for need-based scholarships for students.

The Bizzell Memorial Library at the University of Oklahoma
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The University of Oklahoma Board of Regents unanimously approved a $20 million budget reduction plan Thursday morning.

In his proposal, President David Boren says OU has absorbed more than $80 million dollars in cuts and unfunded fixed cost increases since 2008.

The proposal includes a voluntarily retirement incentive that's expected to save $10 million. The other $10 million would come from eliminating vacant faculty and staff positions, and reducing purchasing and travel expenses in department budgets.

Jason McMullen teaching a math class at Har-ber High School in Springdale, Arkansas.
Emily Wendler / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Jason McMullen taught in Oklahoma for 12 years before he finally decided to move to Arkansas. When he left, his salary was $41,000. His wife was a teacher too, and earned less.  

"It just got to a point where it’s hard to buy a house," McMullen said. "It’s hard to pay bills, it’s hard to raise kids."

After all their bills were paid each month, McMullen says he and his wife had about $250 left for groceries and other living expenses.

"I just could not financially afford to stay any longer," McMullen said.

As protests sweep across the University of Missouri, Yale, and other colleges, University of Oklahoma president David Boren reflects on how the campus he leads reacted to the Sigma Alpha Epsilon incident eight months ago.

OCPA Impact's Dave Bond answers reporters' questions during a November 12, 2015 press conference outside the Oklahoma Supreme Court.
Nate Robson / Oklahoma Watch

A conservative advocacy group is challenging University of Oklahoma President David Boren's plan to fund education through a one cent sales tax increase.

Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs Impact filed a formal protest with the State Supreme Court Thursday, saying Boren's petition is unconstitutional.

OCPA Impact is accusing Boren's group of logrolling four different subjects in to one petition-- and says that violates the Oklahoma Constitution's single subject rule.

University of Oklahoma president David Boren during a Wednesday press conference at the state Capitol.
Emily Wendler / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

University of Oklahoma President David Boren and his education advocacy group filed a petition with the Secretary of State Wednesday that will ask voters to support a one-cent sales tax increase to fund education.

“Are our kids worth a penny?” Boren asked his listeners at the state Capitol.

Various estimates say the tax could cost an Oklahoma family anywhere from $75 to $250 a year.

Oklahoma Watch Executive Editor David Fritze, House Minority Leader Scott Inman (D-Del City) and House Speaker Jeff Hickman (R-Fairview) during an Oct. 20, 2015 panel discussion in Oklahoma City.
Patrick Roberts / KGOU

House Speaker Jeff Hickman says he expects next year's state budget gap to be even higher than the $611 million shortfall lawmakers faced when crafting the spending plan for fiscal year 2016.

The Republican from Fairview expects it could be as high as $700-800 million.

University of Oklahoma President David Boren is proposing a statewide sales tax for education.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

University of Oklahoma President David Boren’s proposed penny sales tax for education reflects a fundamental shift in the way the state is paying for public schools, higher education and other services.

Economists interviewed by Oklahoma Watch expressed concern about reducing the state’s reliance on income taxes and increasing its dependence on sales taxes to finance essential state functions.

University of Oklahoma President David Boren announces the first Indigenous Peoples' Day October 12, 2015 outside the Bizzell Memorial Library on the south end of campus.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Native American students and University of Oklahoma administrators marked the first annual Indigenous Peoples’ Day Monday morning. The ceremony came after the Undergraduate Student Congress passed a resolution last month recognizing the holiday in place of Columbus Day.

Dozens of students and faculty participated in a tribal flag procession down the main thoroughfare on OU’s campus as drums beat and dancers marched toward the library.

University of Oklahoma President David Boren, shown here during a 2015 press conference, is calling for a statewide penny sales tax for education.
Ben Fenwick / Oklahoma Watch

A proposed penny sales tax increase would cost medium-income Oklahomans about $262 a year and raise $608 million annually to finance public schools and higher education, a new data analysis shows.

The bottom 20 percent of Oklahoman households would chip in $90 a year, and the top 1 percent would pay $1,691, the study says.

Penny Education Tax In Other States

Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm at the 2012 Time 100 gala.
David Shankbone / Flickr

The November 2013 meeting with University of Oklahoma President David Boren wasn’t oil billionaire Harold Hamm’s first attempt to discuss with university officials and a state seismologists Oklahoma’s earthquake surge and possible links to oil and gas activity, a new EnergyWire story reveals.

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