KGOU

Downtown Oklahoma City

The Santa Fe Station was built in 1934. It served passenger trains until 1979, and then again from 1999 to the present.
Nomin Ujiyediin / KGOU

Kaye Burlison remembers what the Santa Fe train station looked like in her youth: rusted metal canopies that stained the building’s limestone exterior, and windows fogged up from the uneven temperature control inside.  

“It was rust-colored instead of cream, so it was definitely in disrepair, ” Burlison said.

Developer Sets Eyes On Downtown Oil Mill

Aug 3, 2017
An aerial view of traffic moving along Interstate 40 past the Producers Cooperative Oil Mill in downtown Oklahoma City.
Courtesy photo

A large, vacant property in downtown Oklahoma City could be demolished as soon as this winter, paving the way for new development.

The Producers Cooperative Oil Mill has filed paperwork to demolish the ten structures on the site. The co-op now operates in Altus.

The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming writes the property is listed at $65 million dollars, and broker Don Hayes is marketing the property.

Oklahoma City Council

The Oklahoma City Council approved an agreement Tuesday to help finance a convention hotel with $85.4 million in public funding.

Storme Jones / KGOU

The Scissortail Park will be the newest project to join the MAPS 3 series of renovations.

Community leaders announced the name Thursday at a groundbreaking ceremony.

Photograph used for a newspaper owned by the Oklahoma Publishing Company. Caption: "First Parking Meter"
Oklahoma Historical Society

The Oklahoma City City Council is considering replacing most of the city’s coin-operated parking meters, but losing them means losing part of the city’s history.

Oklahoma State Highway 9
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Driving on poorly maintained roads is costing Oklahoma drivers $5 billion dollars each year, according to a report released Wednesday.

An artist’s conception of a southwest view of the Oklahoma City Community Foundation’s new building.
The Journal Record

Early next year the Oklahoma City Community Foundation will start construction on a new facility.

It took the foundation two tries at city meetings to get the building approved by the Downtown Design Review Committee, The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming reports:

During the first meeting in October, architect David Hornbeek presented a building design that featured a glass front, capstone promenade columns and metal awnings.

A motorist drives by a police barricade placed along Sheridan Avenue in downtown Oklahoma City in advance of a visit from President Barack Obama Wednesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

President Obama’s visit to Oklahoma dominated the news cycle this week, and basically shut down small portions of downtown Oklahoma City, Durant, Interstate 40 – pretty much anywhere inside a one-block radius of the president.

The White House provided only a six day heads up Obama was headed to Oklahoma, and that caused some rapid rearrangement of events in the area, according to The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt:

First National Center in downtown Oklahoma City, from the top of the Devon Tower.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The fate of one of Oklahoma City's most historic skyscrapers could soon be determined.

A California developer told The Oklahoman he'll close later this summer on the purchase of the First National Center in downtown.

Stephen Goodman of the Pleastanton, California-based Goodman and Associates plans to start a $140 million redevelopment project next year that will turn the 1931 art deco building into a combination of offices, retail, restaurants, luxury housing, and a four-star hotel.

The Journal Record Building at 621 N. Robinson Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Tuesday the City Council of Oklahoma City approved a revised agreement for the redevelopment of one of downtown’s most historically significant buildings.

Bill Mihas, the owner of Coney Island in downtown Oklahoma City
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

It’s been nearly 20 years since a bomb destroyed the Murrah building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people and injuring hundreds more. As Oklahoma City prepares to look back on the bombing, one thing is clear — downtown OKC is a far different, and much better place than it was in April 1995. And it’s hard to deny the role the bombing played in the area’s resurgence.

Taxis are parked outside Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The ride-sharing industry in Oklahoma has gone largely unregulated since Uber first arrived in Oklahoma City in 2013. The services have been challenged by limousine and taxi operators, but there’s little in the way of formal rules for how Uber, or its major competitor Lyft, can operate.

House Bill 1614 would change that. Whenever a driver turns on the app and are transporting or picking up passengers, a $1 million liability insurance policy would apply.

Jenks Mayor Lonnie Sims speaks during a press conference on the upcoming vote to renew the Vision 2025 sales tax.
Rip Stell / The Journal Record

A Tulsa tax package will be up for renewal by voters this fall, but with a new twist.

Vision2025, a Tulsa County tax plan similar to Oklahoma City’s MAPS project, is a 0.6 percent sales tax passed in 2003. Since then, it has raised over $600 million for various community projects.

But this year, cities affected by the tax plan have the chance to opt out, says Journal Record managing editor Adam Brooks.

A townhome at The Hill at Bricktown in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Over a seven-year period, the number of homes in downtown Oklahoma City will more than quadruple, and almost none of them will be for sale.

Oklahoma City Assistant City Planner Ian Colgan says 96 percent of the homes downtown are rentals - demonstrating a growing trend of lease properties, as opposed to traditional, single-family homes for sale.

Oklahoma City Skyline at night
StevenSmith1 / Flickr Creative Commons

Since 2002, Oklahoma City’s mayor has hosted a Development Roundtable to bring together local leaders and outside experts for conversation about the city’s expansion, progress, and improvement.

http://www.BrightMusic.org/

With Father’s Day upon us, our hope is that this week’s OneSix8 might inspire an outing with dear ol’ Dad...and the rest of family.

Oklahoma City’s own Brightmusic Chamber Ensemble presents its third annual Spring Festival called “The Music of France” at St. Paul’s Cathedral in downtown Oklahoma City. The four-part concert series takes place Thursday, June 12, Saturday, June 14, Sunday, June 15 and Tuesday, June 17.