driving

minimoniotaku / Flickr.com

Oklahoma law enforcement agencies are joining a national campaign intended to crack down on drunken drivers through the Labor Day holiday weekend.

The "Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over" campaign begins Friday and runs through Sept. 1.

Officials say officers will be aggressively looking for impaired drivers and arresting anyone who is caught driving while impaired.

The highway patrol says that, on average, there is one alcohol impaired driving-related death every 51 minutes across the country.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the implications of the Roma child found living with a couple in Greece, and the October 26 protest by Saudi women in defiance of the country's traditions against driving.

Later, a conversation about water and sanitation in Africa with the University of Oklahoma 2013 International Water Prize winner Ada Oko-Williams, and University College London hydrogeologist Richard Taylor.

saudi woman in hijab
Edward Musiak / Flickr Creative Commons

On October 26 dozens of Saudi women got behind the wheel in defiance of the country’s traditions. Though no specific law bans women from driving, the rules are enforced by Saudi Arabia's powerful Islamic establishment.

Rebecca Cruise, the Assistant Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies, says even though the issue seems to be gaining traction, she’s heard critics argue it’s symbolic of larger issues Saudi women face.

Oklahoma Watch

During most of the past two decades, the annual number of alcohol-related traffic deaths across the country has fallen by about 20 percent, to more than 11,500.

More stringent drunken driving laws, widespread public education campaigns and safer vehicles have all played a role in that sharp reduction.

In Oklahoma, however, it’s been a much different story. Despite having the same safer vehicles, increased educational efforts and tougher laws, the state saw a 10 percent increase in alcohol-related traffic deaths between 1994 and 2012. The trend mystifies state public-safety officials.

Okla. House Kills Texting and Driving Ban Again

Apr 23, 2013
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The Oklahoma House for the third time this session has derailed a proposal to ban texting while driving.  

The latest text ban attempt came in the form of an amendment by State Rep. Curtis McDaniel (D-Smithville) on a bill dealing with reckless driving penalties.

The amendment was tabled Tuesday with a 49-37 vote.