ecology

Rebecca Cruise talks with University of Oklahoma political scientist Paul Goode about competing narratives in the Western and Russian media about what's happening in Ukraine, and why he thinks the crisis isn't likely to end soon despite Friday's agreement.

Later, Suzette Grillot's conversation with author Paul Bogard about the human, environmental, and economic consequences of artificially lighting the night sky. He's the author of The End of Night: Searching for Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light.

Craig Mayhew and Robert Simmon / NASA GSFC

Growing up in northern Minnesota, Paul Bogard grew to love the darkness as he watched the Milky Way at night. Moved by these early experiences and motivated to understand the consequences of artificial light pollution, Bogard explores the human, environmental, and economic consequences of artificially lighting the night sky in his book The End of Night: Searching for Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light.

Erle Ellis

Over the last three decades, certain environmental scientists have started characterizing a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, to mark the moment when humans started profoundly affecting ecological landscapes.

University of Maryland, Baltimore County ecologist Erle Ellis studies how agriculture, hunting, settlements, and other human activity have changed landscapes. He estimates three-quarters of earth’s land could be characterized as anthropogenic. But even as humans influence their environment, the mass influx of residents into urban centers can reverse that process.