ecology

World Views
3:37 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

World Views: February 21, 2014

Rebecca Cruise talks with University of Oklahoma political scientist Paul Goode about competing narratives in the Western and Russian media about what's happening in Ukraine, and why he thinks the crisis isn't likely to end soon despite Friday's agreement.

Later, Suzette Grillot's conversation with author Paul Bogard about the human, environmental, and economic consequences of artificially lighting the night sky. He's the author of The End of Night: Searching for Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light.

Read more
World Views
11:22 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Night Alight: Ramifications Of Using Artificial Illumination

The brightest areas of Earth are the most urbanized, but not necessarily the most populated (compare Western Europe with China and India). The United States Interstate Highway System appears as a lattice connecting the brighter dots of city centers.
Craig Mayhew and Robert Simmon NASA GSFC

Growing up in northern Minnesota, Paul Bogard grew to love the darkness as he watched the Milky Way at night. Moved by these early experiences and motivated to understand the consequences of artificial light pollution, Bogard explores the human, environmental, and economic consequences of artificially lighting the night sky in his book The End of Night: Searching for Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light.

Read more
World Views
1:32 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

Exploring Large-Scale Human Influence On Landscape And Ecology

Erle Ellis investigated nitrogen cycling across an entire village in China under pre-industrial, nitrogen-limiting conditions relative to the nitrogen-saturated conditions of 1994 to assess the role of nitrogen cycling in sustainable agricultural management.
Credit Erle Ellis

Over the last three decades, certain environmental scientists have started characterizing a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, to mark the moment when humans started profoundly affecting ecological landscapes.

University of Maryland, Baltimore County ecologist Erle Ellis studies how agriculture, hunting, settlements, and other human activity have changed landscapes. He estimates three-quarters of earth’s land could be characterized as anthropogenic. But even as humans influence their environment, the mass influx of residents into urban centers can reverse that process.

Read more