government shutdown

Dick Duhn, owner of Arbuckle RV Resort, said business was down more than 50 percent during the government shutdown.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The U.S. government shutdown in October 2013 was the culmination of a national political fight over federal budgeting, but its effects were felt far from Washington, D.C., including at two federal park sites in Oklahoma.

Sulphur, Okla. relies heavily on the tourism revenue it gets as a result of being attached to the Chickasaw National Wildlife Refuge, which was shutdown for the first half of October along with the rest of the country’s national parks and wildlife refuges.

A hand grabs for currency.
Steve Wampler /

Gov. Mary Fallin is ordering state agency leaders not to use any state money to temporarily fund federal programs during the ongoing partial government shutdown unless they've been guaranteed federal reimbursement.

Fallin's Secretary of Finance Preston Doerflinger sent a memo on Tuesday to all state agency directors and finance officers to that effect. The memo urges agency heads to discontinue any federally funded programs that could result in a permanent loss of state funds.

Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Thousands of federal workers in Oklahoma were furloughed because of the budget stalemate in Washington, D.C., including those in charge of operating and maintaining dozens of campsites and parks run by the U.S. government.

It's Day 10 of the partial federal government shutdown, and the big news is a meeting between President Obama and a select group of House Republicans.

The federal shutdown that has idled some 800,000 government workers could be over by now — if members of Congress were able to vote on a bill that doesn't include an attack on the new U.S. health care system, President Obama says. "There are enough votes in the House of Representatives to make sure that the government reopens today," he told The Associated Press Friday.

As the government shutdown enters its fifth day, House Republicans and Senate Democrats continue to spar over who's being more unreasonable in this fight.

GOP members now find themselves on the defensive, as they face questions about forgoing pay and forgoing staff during the widespread furloughs.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the foreign policy implications of the partial federal government shutdown, and the lingering effects of last month's mall shooting in Nairobi on Kenya's tourism industry and political stability.

Later, Suzette talks with Reggie Whitten, the founder of the Oklahoma City-based charity Pros for Africa. His foundation works closely with Sister Rosemary Nyirumbe, a nun from Uganda who operates a school for children affected by Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army.

Secretary of Defense / Flickr Creative Commons

The partial government shutdown entered its fourth day Friday, and President Obama canceled a planned 17-day Asia trip that was part of his administration’s “pivot” to focus more on the rising economic powers in the region.

“This is not the first time he’s had to cancel trips to Asia,” says Rebecca Cruise, a comparative politics expert and the Assistant Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies. “So this does send an interesting message to those leaders. Are we really going to be focusing our attention there, or are we really trying to get involved in the region, and try to exert our interest there vis-à-vis China? That has consequences.”

OakleyOriginals / Flickr Creative Commons

Federally run campsites, parks and pavilions at dozens of Oklahoma lakes controlled by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have closed because of the federal government shutdown. But that’s not keeping people away from lakes like Texoma, Eufaula, and Tenkiller, it’s just funneling them into state parks instead.

Government Shutdown Could Curb Benefits For Oklahoma Women, Children

Oct 3, 2013
woman and child in a WIC office
U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr Creative Commons

If the partial shutdown of the federal government continues for weeks, it could lead to cutbacks in the federally funded program that helps low-income women, infants and children in Oklahoma, officials said Wednesday.

One possible result could be limiting the aid provided under the federal Women, Infants and Children program to only one or two of those groups, such as infants.

Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) greeting President Barack Obama.
Tom Coburn / Facebook

Oklahoma’s U.S. Senator Tom Coburn and Congressman James Lankford both took to the floors of their respective chambers Wednesday.

Coburn says the current impasse between House Republicans and Senate Democrats is the product of inaction, and the continuing resolution shows they haven’t been doing their job anyway.

"And one of the reasons we are where we are is, I think, failed leadership,” Coburn says. “Both by Republicans and Democrats.”

(We most recently updated this post at 8:31 p.m. ET.)

We said it Tuesday: "No end in sight."

The story's the same a day later.

Pardon us for being repetitive, but there's no end in sight to the partial shutdown of the federal government.

Susan Shannon

Thousands of civilian employees at Tinker Air Force Base are being furloughed and the national Storm Prediction Center is cutting down on its communication to the public as the federal government faces its first full day of a partial shutdown.

Officials at Tinker Air Force Base say about 2,900 of 14,000 civilian employees have been furloughed until federal funding is resumed. Nearly 700 federal technicians at the Oklahoma National Guard have also been furloughed.

EINAHPETS32 / Flickr Creative Commons

Thousands of federal workers in Oklahoma face furloughs and U.S. government services have been limited by the shutdown that began at midnight Oct. 1.

The shutdown also means national parks and recreation areas at federally run lakes are closed. That means no camping, fishing, boating or swimming at Eufaula, Texoma and Tenkiller, at least at U.S. Army Corps of Engineers facilities.

The Panda Cam? That's Shut Down, Too

Oct 1, 2013

By now, you've probably heard that the federal government shut down at 12:01 a.m. ET Tuesday after members of Congress were unable to reach a budget agreement in time to keep the government funded.