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World Views
12:50 pm
Fri October 3, 2014

World Views: October 3, 2014

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the so-called "Umbrella Revolution" protests in Hong Kong , and the closing arguments in the Bosnian war crimes trial of Radovan Karadžić in The Hague.

Later, a conversation with University of Waterloo political scientist Mariam Mufti. She studies electoral and party politics in South Asia, as well as democratization and regime change.

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World Views
11:24 am
Fri October 3, 2014

Understanding How Pakistan's 65-Year History Led To The Current 'Hybrid Regime'

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Navy Adm. Mike Mullen reviews Pakistani troops during a ceremony honoring Mullen's arrival to Islamabad, Pakistan, Feb. 9, 2008.
Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley, U.S. Navy Wikimedia Commons

In 1947, the Indian subcontinent gained independence from the United Kingdom and split into three states: the Muslim majority countries of East and West Pakistan and the Hindu majority country of India.

“This is very important for us to understand,” says University of Waterloo professor Mariam Mufti. “Because subsequently all of Pakistan's actions on the international community have been driven by this foreign policy that was very India-centric.”

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Remembrances
2:08 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

WWI Poet's Diaries Now Online

Drawing of a soldier, entitled ‘The Soul of an Officer’. June-August 1916. (Credit: The Trustees of G. T. Sassoon Deceased / Cambridge University Library)

Originally published on Tue August 5, 2014 3:08 pm

As Britain marks the 100th anniversary of its entry into World War I, the notebooks of one of the country’s most famous war poets are being published for the first time.

Siegfried Sassoon served on the Western Front and he recorded his experiences in small diaries that are filled with sketches and anecdotes that express the horrors of World War I, the so-called Great War.

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Books
2:47 pm
Mon August 4, 2014

Book Gives Fly-On-The-Wall Access To Nixon Presidency

Republican president of the United States Richard Nixon thumbing up after announcing his resignation from the presidency after the Watergate scandal on August 9, 1974. (AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon August 4, 2014 3:37 pm

Forty years ago this week, Richard Nixon resigned from the presidency as a result of the Watergate scandal. Now, a new book gives insight into Richard Nixon, pre-Watergate.

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Education
8:00 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Online Resource Site For American Indian Education

Oklahoma Indian Education Resource
Credit Oklahoma Department of Education

Many people packed into the State Department of Education board room Friday afternoon to see the unveiling of the Oklahoma Indian Education Resource website.

The website hosts an abundance of materials to aid teachers in educating students about the Indian heritage and history.

State Superintendent Janet Barresi said the site is “the result of the diligence of quite a few people over many, many years.”

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Oklahoma Voices
11:04 am
Mon June 30, 2014

Oklahoma's Early Banking An Era Of 'Wild West Capitalism'

Credit University of Oklahoma Press

Overzealous railroad builders and near-constant debates over the merits of gold vs. silver led to the worst financial crisis the United States had ever seen toward the end of the 19th century.

By the time the dust had settled after the Panic of 1893, the U.S. comptroller of the currency's annual report indicated 573 national, state, private, and savings banks as well as loan, trust and mortgage companies failed during the year.

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Oklahoma Voices
11:14 am
Mon April 14, 2014

How Abraham Lincoln Used 701 Words To "Bind Up The Nation's Wounds"

The handwritten opening lines of President Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural address, delivered March 4, 1865.
Credit Library of Congress

A little over a month before his assassination, President Abraham Lincoln delivered his second inaugural address as the Civil War drew to a close.

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

World Views: October 25, 2013

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss record levels of smog that are forcing the closure of schools and businesses in Northeast China, and heavy-handed tactics by Russia toward its former Soviet neighbors.

University of Oklahoma historian Kyle Harper joins the program to talk about how smallpox and the bubonic plague contributed to the fall of the Roman Empire. His latest project focuses on the effects of disease and climate change on the history of civilization.

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World Views
12:18 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

Germ Theory: How Disease And Climate Change Toppled The Roman Empire

The Roman Colosseum - September 26, 2009.
Credit Yellow.Cat / Flickr Creative Commons

University of Oklahoma historian Kyle Harper says there have been thousands of answers to what caused the fall of the Roman Empire. Overexpansion, economics, and the rise of Christianity are all valid explanations, but he’s exploring the role of disease and climate change.

“When we look back at the Roman Empire now, we can see that changes in the Romans' environment, both the climate, but also the kind of species that live in and around humans, especially pathogens, play an enormous role in the collapse,” Harper says.

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The Salt
2:24 am
Wed April 24, 2013

How Coffee Influenced The Course Of History

An overseer sits in the shade while workers collect coffee beans on a Brazilian plantation, circa 1750.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 2:49 pm

Coffee is a powerful beverage. On a personal level, it helps keep us awake and active. On a much broader level, it has helped shape our history and continues to shape our culture.

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