KGOU

Jon Echols

Oklahoma state Sen. A.J. Griffin, R-Guthrie, speaks during a news conference in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017.
Sue Ogracki / AP Photo

Teachers are preparing to walk out of the classroom starting April 2, and several legislators have proposed plans to avoid the work stoppage. One in particular, proposed by former teacher Sen. Michael Bergstrom, R-Adair, would raise pay for both teachers and state employees.

A bottle of Charlotte’s Web cannabidiol oil.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Last year, Oklahoma lawmakers approved a medical treatment for severe childhood seizures that used part of the cannabis plant. Another piece of legislation that would widely expand the law is close to Gov. Mary Fallin’s desk.

Oklahoma will now exclude cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating chemical found in marijuana, from its definition of the drug.
Dank Depot / Flickr Creative Commons

A group that supports the use of medical marijuana in Oklahoma plans to submit signed petitions to the Oklahoma Secretary of State's office to have the issue placed on the November ballot.

Tulsa-based Oklahomans for Health plans to submit the petitions on Friday. The group faces a Saturday deadline to gather the signatures of more than 155,000 registered Oklahoma voters who support a referendum on the issue.

Provided

The House Judiciary Committee this week approved workers' compensation legislation by Senate President Pro Tem Brian Bingman (R-Sapulpa), but didn’t get in any hurry about it.

The novel-length bill that would move the decision on how to compensate injured workers from a court-based system to an administrative one is another step closer to being law. The hearing on the bill was delayed by two weeks while the House made changes to fix some problems in the plan.