KGOU

Mary Fallin

The Special Session, In Numbers

Nov 22, 2017
FILE- Oklahoma State Capitol
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Highlights in numbers from the 2017 special session that ended on Nov.17:

Oklahoma state capitol
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin has chosen the state’s secretary of state to fill the vacant attorney general office.

Fallin picked Mike Hunter to be the state’s next attorney general. The post was vacated last week when former AG Scott Pruitt was sworn in to become the head of the Environmental Protection Agency. Hunter was the first assistant attorney general under Pruitt between June 2015 and October 2016. He left the AG’s office when Fallin selected him to be secretary of state.

Oklahoma Capitol
ensign_beedrill / Flickr Creative Commons

 

The Oklahoma legislature could make big changes to the state sales taxes this session in an attempt to balance an estimated $870 million budget shortfall and provide a pay raise to teachers.

In her state of the state speech on Monday, Governor Mary Fallin proposed a pair of tax cuts, coupled with an expansion of the state’s sales tax system that would raise Oklahoma’s tax revenue by $1.1 billion.

Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin at her 2017 State of the State address on Feb. 6, 2017.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

 

Coming into Mary Fallin’s 7th state of the state address as governor of Oklahoma, there was one big question: How will the state deal with another revenue shortfall, and not cut funding to agencies that provide services. The state faces an estimated $870  million budget gap in the upcoming fiscal year. That comes after clawing out a 1.3 billion dollar deficit last year.

Fallin hinted last week she would present a series of changes to the sales tax system. On Tuesday, she outlined her plan.

Gov. Mary Fallin during her 2015 State of the State address Feb. 2, 2015.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

 

As Governor Mary Fallin prepares for her State of the State address on Monday, February 6th, the Oklahoma legislature looks at changes involving taxes, criminal justice and disciplining some of their own.

At the Associated Press Legislative Forum on Thursday, Gov. Fallin said she wants to see, “a major overhaul of our tax system.”

Gov. Mary Fallin delivers her 2016 State of the State address Feb. 1, 2016.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin says early projections show Oklahoma will have a nearly $600 million hole in next year's state budget. That’s nearly 10 percent of the current year's spending.

"It's going to be a challenging year,” Fallin said during a Wednesday news conference. “We've got certainly need within the Department of Corrections, which you've seen recently. We've got needs with Highway Patrol, in Mental Health Services. There's a lot of competing needs out there, for money.”

Gov. Mary Fallin and her husband Wade Christensen look out from an elevator as she arrives at Trump Tower, Monday, Nov. 21, 2016 in New York.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

Two high-level officials in Oklahoma are under consideration for President-elect Donald Trump’s administration, but state law is particular about who can fill their seats if one or both move to Washington.

Gov. Mary Fallin and Attorney General Scott Pruitt have both met with Trump as he forms his Cabinet. Fallin is rumored to be a candidate for Secretary of the Interior, and Pruitt’s name has been floated for a role within the Environmental Protection Agency.

How Would Todd Lamb Govern?

Nov 28, 2016
Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb shorlty before the State of the State address Monday at the Oklahoma state Capitol.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

If Gov. Mary Fallin joins President-elect Donald Trump’s administration, Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb will step in to finish the two years left in her term.

The question is, would that mean status quo in policies since both are Republicans, or would Lamb’s half-term, combined with a big crop of new legislators, bring significant changes?

Gov. Mary Fallin and her husband Wade Christensen look out from an elevator as she arrives at Trump Tower, Monday, Nov. 21, 2016 in New York.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

President-elect Donald Trump met with Gov. Mary Fallin on Monday to discuss a possible cabinet post. 

Updated 11:23 a.m.

Fallin emerged from Trump's office in Midtown Manhattan on Monday, saying she and the president-elect discussed his plan and agenda for the country and how she might be able to help.

"No, I was not offered a position. It was just an initial meeting to discuss a wide range of topics," Fallin told reporters gathered in the lobby of Trump Tower. The governor was accompanied by her husband Wade Christensen.

Gov. Mary Fallin announces new cabinet appointments with Mike Hunter, Jennifer Chance, and Chris Benge during a news conference Monday.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Gov. Mary Fallin says she'll still vote for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump even after his 2005 comments that came to light Friday. In a press conference Monday, Fallin said she believes Trump's “vision for America” is better than Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s.

“Certainly I was offended by Donald Trump's remarks about women, as any woman would be. But he has apologized. I accept his apology,” Fallin said. “Those comments were made over 11 years ago, and in the end, what I'm looking at is the platform, the position, that presidential candidates are running on.”

Gov. Mary Fallin, second from right, and her husband, Wade Christensen, second from left, greet Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, right, following a rally in Oklahoma City, Friday, Feb. 26, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / Associated Press

Gov. Mary Fallin says she's "disappointed and offended" by comments Donald Trump made about women in 2005, but she didn't pull her endorsement of the Republican presidential candidate.

In a statement posted on her campaign's Twitter account during Sunday night's presidential debate, the Republican governor said that both Trump and Hillary Clinton "are very flawed and have made mistakes."

A Devon Energy disposal well near Stillwater, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin and Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson both say energy policy needs to be included in the national political debate, but they disagree on a transmission line project that would move wind energy from the Oklahoma panhandle to western Tennessee.

Fallin currently chairs the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, and Hutchinson takes over that role next year. Both spoke Monday at the group's annual conference in Little Rock.

Fallin says she supports the Plains & Eastern Clean Line transmission project designed to move up to 4,000 megawatts of wind energy.

Gov. Mary Fallin, second from right, and her husband, Wade Christensen, second from left, greet Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, right, following a rally in Oklahoma City, Friday, Feb. 26, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / Associated Press

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump named four Oklahomans to his newly created Agriculture Advisory Committee Tuesday. Gov. Mary Fallin is the highest profile Oklahoman on the panel.

“The Trump administration will work closely with farmers, ranchers and other agricultural producers to ensure their issues and concerns are being addressed,” Fallin said in a statement.

The 64-member committee also includes state Agriculture Secretary Jim Resse, state Sen. Eddie Fields and state Rep. Casey Murdock.

Attorney David Slane talks with media outside the Oklahoma Supreme Court clerk's office, August 9, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Attorney David Slane is suing Gov. Mary Fallin over $140 million in unspent state funds he contends should go to state agencies. Slane filed the lawsuit Tuesday with the Oklahoma Supreme Court on behalf of six clients who receive state services through the Department of Human Services.

Gov. Mary Fallin speaks during the final day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Thursday.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

Gov. Mary Fallin says Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump can end the country’s divisions and restore a sense of optimism.

Fallin delivered a primetime address Thursday during the final evening of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. She described Trump as a bold and courageous leader who speaks truth to power.

Gov. Mary Fallin speaks during first day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Monday, July 18, 2016.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

Gov. Mary Fallin says she plans to talk about what her party stands for during her address on the final night of the Republican National Convention.

She told MSNBC’s Morning Joe on Wednesday her speech Thursday evening will be similar to the brief remarks she delivered Monday when she talked about the party’s platform.

Gov. Mary Fallin, R-Okla., addresses the delegates during the opening day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Monday, July 18, 2016.
Mark J. Terrill / AP

Gov. Mary Fallin spoke briefly during Monday’s opening of the Republican National Convention. Fallin serves as one of the co-chairs of the GOP’s platform committee, and says the party’s principles can change the way people think, and the direction of the country.

Gov. Mary Fallin responds to a question during an interview in Oklahoma City, Thursday, July 7, 2016. Fallin says she's had no direct contact with Donald Trump's presidential campaign about serving as his vice president.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Gov. Mary Fallin says both Republican and Democratic presidential candidates, and anyone currently in public service, should relay a message of equal justice.

Fallin told CNN's Jake Tapper on Sunday’s State of the Union she believes Donald Trump is trying to campaign as a racial healer in the aftermath of violence last week in Louisiana, Minnesota, and Texas.

Governor Delays Use Of Card Scanners

Jun 17, 2016
Gov. Mary Fallin delivers her 2016 State of the State address Feb. 1, 2016.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin directed the Oklahoma Department of Public Safety to delay use of recently obtained portable card readers capable of freezing or seizing funds from prepaid debit cards.

In a media release distributed late Friday, Fallin’s office said the governor had directed her cabinet secretary of safety and security to postpone use of the devices until more thorough policies can be developed and more public education undertaken. She did not specify a time frame.

Gov. Mary Fallin speaking at the 2013 Governor's Energy Conference in Tulsa, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin on Friday signed into law legislation that banks boom-time tax revenues to cushion the state during energy downturns.

The Energy Revenues Stabilization Act was created through House Bill 2763, authored by Rep. John Montgomery, R-Lawton. The measure siphons off above-average tax revenues levied on corporations and oil and gas production and saves it in an account that can be tapped during state funding emergencies.

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