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Mick Cornett

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett has been a prominent figure during this week’s Republican National Convention.

He delivered speech Monday on behalf of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, having just taken over as the group’s president in June. Oklahoma City’s elections are technically non-partisan, but Cornett does identify as a Republican (he made it to a runoff with Gov. Mary Fallin in the 2006 Congressional primary when they vied for U.S. Rep. Ernest Istook’s old seat). During Cornett’s address in Cleveland earlier this week, he talked a lot about the success of Republican mayors across the country.

Mick Cornett, Chair, U.S. Conference of Mayors and Mayor of Oklahoma City speaks during the opening day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Monday, July 18, 2016.
Mark J. Terrill / AP

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett described success by GOP municipal leaders during the first day of the Republican National Convention Monday afternoon in Cleveland.

Cornett said Republicans hold the top jobs from San Diego to Miami, including Oklahoma’s two largest cities. He said Republicans have held the Oklahoma City mayor’s seat for 29 consecutive years.

Workers repair a road in Oklahoma City, July 9, 2014.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Mayor Mick Cornett says the next iteration of the MAPS sales tax could be used to repair crumbling infrastructure in Oklahoma City, but reiterated it likely won’t come this year.
Voters will consider renewing Oklahoma City's general obligation bond in 2017, and a street development impact fee will also take effect.

On Monday, Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett became president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Over the weekend, the group met in Indianapolis to elect Cornett and lay out a broad policy agenda for the next year -- much of which focused on advocating in Washington. Mayors will focus on pushing for congressional funding to combat the Zika virus, improve infrastructure and treat opioid addiction.

Mick Cornett, the mayor of Oklahoma City, grew up there and saw the city he now leads rebound from the 1995 bombing of the Murrah federal building. He’s the incoming head of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, which meets in Indianapolis this weekend.

In a conversation with Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd, Cornett weighs in on how a city recovers from a terrorist attack, and describes the crisis facing virtually every mayor in the U.S.: how to pay for repairs to crumbling infrastructure like roads and bridges.

The site of the MAPS 3 park in downtown Oklahoma City.
Samuel Perry / The Journal Record

Ever since the 2009 passage of the MAPS 3 sales tax incentive that would fund a series of civic project in Oklahoma City, residents have been waiting for the park.

The so-called "core-to-shore" vision would connect the Myriad Botanical Gardens with the Oklahoma River, with an already-built pedestrian bridge bisecting Interstate 40 and connecting the two halves of the 70-acre greenbelt.

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett during the January 13, 2016 State of the City address during a Greater Oklahoma City Chamber luncheon.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City mayor Mick Cornett was upbeat during Wednesday’s 2016 State of the City address.

Cornett touted a 10 percent decrease in the crime rate, and ran through a number of publications that ranked Oklahoma City as one of the best places in the country to start a business or visit.

SW 25th Street in Oklahoma City's Capitol Hill neighborhood.
Jason B. / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Community groups are starting to gather ideas that could be included in a potential fourth Metropolitan Area Projects, or MAPS, plan.

A group called MAPS 4 Neighborhoods is holding meetings to gather ideas for the next phase of a sales tax that funds community improvements.

Mayor Mick Cornett announces Oklahoma City is in talks to bring Google Fiber's high-speed internet service to the city.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Mayor Mick Cornett and representatives from Google gathered on the rooftop of the Oklahoma City Museum of Art Wednesday to announce Google Fiber, a high-speed internet service, might come to Oklahoma City.

On a clear, blue afternoon with the Oklahoma City skyline as his backdrop, Cornett said Google has been in town for weeks, exploring the sophistication of the city and gathering data about infrastructure and the ease of doing business.

The previous site plan for the downtown Oklahoma City convention center.
Courtesy rendering / The Journal Record

Tuesday afternoon Oklahoma City leaders announced they would start looking for a new site for the convention center that's part of the Metropolitan Area Projects, or MAPS 3, proposal voters approved in 2009.

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