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National Weather Service

National Weather Service

An excessive heat warning is still in effect for parts of north central and northeastern Oklahoma, and much of the state is under a heat advisory as temperatures in upper 90s continue to grip the state. Heat index values in some areas could reach as high as 113 degrees. Both Oklahoma City and Tulsa could see heat indices in the triple digits.

The excessive heat warning will be in effect until 8:00 p.m. Friday evening. The heat advisory will be active until 8:00 p.m. on Saturday.

Oklahomans will face temperatures in the high 90s and heat index values near 110 degrees.
National Weather Service

Forecasters from the National Weather Service in Norman say dangerous heat will grip much of the state for the next few days. Parts of north-central and northeastern Oklahoma – including the metro areas of Oklahoma City and Tulsa - are in an excessive heat warning until 8:00 p.m. on Friday. Temperatures in the upper 90s are expected, with afternoon heat index values between 110 and 115. The entire state, except the Oklahoma Panhandle and far western counties bordering the Texas Panhandle, is under a heat advisory.

A tornado touches down near Wynnewood, Oklahoma on May 9, 2016.
Hayden Mahan

The Myriad Botanical Gardens in downtown Oklahoma City is bustling with activity on a sunny day as people push strollers, walk dogs and feed the ducks. It’s a gorgeous Wednesday afternoon right now, but it’s springtime in Oklahoma, so the weather can change at any time.

“When it starts raining, is when I start looking at the messages,” Devonte Thibodeax said as walked along the garden’s waterway with Michaela Schweiger.

“If my iPhone does those alerts, where it goes off, that’s when we know something is actually happening,” Schweiger said.

National Weather Service

The National Weather Service forecasts a variety of dangerous weather conditions across Oklahoma into Monday.

Meteorologist Jesus Lopez demonstrates some of the weather forecasting software at the Telemundo studios in Oklahoma City.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Oklahoma’s Spanish speakers have more access to severe weather information now than they did two years ago when tornadoes ripped through Moore and other parts of the Oklahoma City metro. But despite the improvements, gaps in communication remain.

Forecasters Apologize, But Why?

Jan 28, 2015

Meteorologists have apologized for getting yesterday’s snow totals so wrong in New Jersey, where only about 3 inches fell instead of the 24 that was predicted.

But other weather experts say the forecasts were not all that wrong because due to last-minute changes in the air, the storm simply tracked about 75 miles farther east than expected, and dropped 30 inches of snow on Long Island.

Paul L. McCord Jr. / Flickr Creative Commons

A small tornado that touched ground briefly in Arcadia has been rated an EF0 by the National Weather Service in Norman.

Weather service meteorologist Marc Austin said Monday that the tornado caused no damage and appeared to have been on the ground for 30 seconds or less in the small town in the northeastern Oklahoma City metro.

The preliminary rating for the Sunday afternoon twister is the smallest given by the weather service and indicates wind speeds of 40-72 mph.

National Weather Service

Oklahoma highway officials say they're preparing for a series of weather systems that forecasters predict will bring sub-freezing temperatures and a chance of snow to the state.

The National Weather Service says a cold front expected to move southeastward across Oklahoma Monday will be followed by much colder air, strong winds and plummeting wind chills.

Storm Prediction Center / National Weather Service

The Storm Prediction Center is adding two threat levels to its U.S. weather outlooks so people aren't surprised by really bad storms on days with just a "slight risk" of tornadoes, hail or high winds.

Beginning Oct. 22, forecasters can say whether slight risk days are "enhanced" or "marginal." Other categories remain, including "high" and "moderate."

The Norman, Oklahoma-based center proposed the change after finding that some days had conditions worse than a "slight risk" but not as bad as a "moderate risk."

An airman kneels and prays in the Moore neighborhood south of Plaza Towers Elementary School.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Tuesday marks the first anniversary of the May 20, 2013 tornado that killed 24 residents in Moore, injured hundreds, and caused an estimated $2 billion in damage.

To mark the occasion, the Norman Forecast Office of the National Weather Service put together a presentation highlighting a dozen observations from the 2013 storms in the community also hard-hit by strong, violent tornadoes in May 1999 and May 2013.

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