Oklahoma Corporation Commission

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State oil and gas authorities are finalizing legal action to force a “financially strapped” Oklahoma energy company to abandon disposal wells suspected of contributing to earthquakes.

Sandridge Energy has been defying directives from the Oklahoma Corporation Commission to shut down six disposal wells in north-central Oklahoma. Commission staff are finalizing a legal filing that, if approved, could modify permits and halt operation of the wells.

The Rev. Dr. Bruce Prescott speaks during Tuesday's protest on the steps of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission as other demonstrators hold signs voicing opposition to OG&E's demand charge proposal.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Gas and Electric, the state’s largest electricity utility, wants regulators to approve new fees for customers who install solar panels. The request is now in the hands of Oklahoma’s three-member Corporation Commission, which has to weigh the real cost of reliable electricity and put a fair value on power from the sun.

OG&E's coal-fired power plant in Muskogee.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

This morning the Oklahoma Corporation Commission rejected a plan by the state’s largest utility that could’ve raised monthly utility rates by nearly 20 percent over the next half-decade.

Oklahoma Gas & Electric made the $1.14 billion request in order to pay for upgrades that would put coal-fired power plants in compliance with the federal Clean Air Act.

An oil and gas operation in northwestern Oklahoma's Mississippi Lime formation.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

As SandRidge Energy struggles with $4.6 billion in debt and a faltering stock price that’s threatening its listing on the New York Stock Exchange, the Oklahoma City oil and gas company is facing another problem: Earthquakes and new regulations designed to slow the shaking:

Oklahoma Corporation Commission

Oklahoma oil and gas authorities on Tuesday ordered cutbacks at disposal wells in north-central Oklahoma.

The restrictions come after a barrage of earthquakes near the town of Medford.

From left, Oklahoma Corporation Commission members Todd Hiett, Dana Murphy and Bob Anthony hear arguments in the Jim Thorpe Building in Oklahoma City on Tuesday to determine whether the agency should reopen a two-decade-old telephone rate case.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Tuesday the Oklahoma Corporation Commission is delayed a decision to reopen a 25-year-old telecommunications rate case

In 1989, the commission voted 2-1 to allow then-Southwestern Bell (what’s now AT&T) to invest $30 million dollars in infrastructure instead of offering customers a refund.

Midtown Plaza Court
Kool Cats Photography / Wikimedia Commons

Back in June, the Oklahoma City Council voted to annex Midtown into the Downtown business improvement district, or BID.

The marketing, street furnishing, and the maintenance of the neighborhood will be overseen by the civic and development group Downtown Oklahoma City, Incorporated.

Mike Moeller, senior director of mid-continent assets for Enbridge Energy.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma’s boom in man-made earthquakes has become a national security threat. It’s easy to understand why.

The ground is shaking near Cushing, Oklahoma, home to the largest commercial crude oil storage center in North America, where big money is made storing and moving crude. The massive oil hub is connected to dozens of pipelines and lined with hundreds of airplane hangar-sized tanks currently holding an estimated 54 million barrels of oil.

Workers in an oil field near Seminole, Okla., in 1939.
Russell Lee / Library of Congress

An upsurge of earthquakes linked to the oil and gas industry continues to rattle Oklahoma, but new research suggests most of the significant earthquakes recorded in the state over the last century also were likely triggered by drilling activity.

Oklahoma oil and gas regulators in August 2015 ordered oil and gas companies to sharply limit waste fluid injection at disposal wells, including this one, Equal Energy's Goodnight SWDW No. 5 in Logan County.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Marjo Operating Co. Inc. is the first oil and gas operator to challenge regulatory actions issued by state regulators attempting to curb an ongoing surge of earthquakes linked to the industry.

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