slavery

World Views
4:02 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Why Modern-Day Slavery Is A Drag On The Economy And Environment

missy & the universe Flickr Creative Commons

For most Americans, the word "slavery" conjures up images of the distant past - a land of cotton, plantations, and blue and grey coats. It seems like a relic from a different time and a different world, but in reality, more people are enslaved today than at any point in human history.

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Oklahoma Voices
11:30 am
Mon May 26, 2014

Where Did Freedom Come From? A Case For Coincidence In U.S. History’s Defining Conflict

Our Banner in the Sky
Frederic Edwin Church Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

The nation pauses Monday to mark Memorial Day and honor the thousands of soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines who made the ultimate sacrifice for this country’s freedom. The holiday started in the late 1860s to honor Union and Confederate soldiers killed during the four brutal years of the American Civil War.

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Oklahoma Voices
11:55 am
Mon May 5, 2014

Abraham Lincoln's 'Four Roads to Emancipation'

General Records of the United States National Archives

Historian Allen Guelzo calls the Emancipation Proclamation “the single most sweeping presidential action in American history.” It dealt with slavery in a way the Framers during the Constitutional Convention never did, and decidedly outlined a key goal of the Union during the Civil War.

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World Views
12:18 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

Germ Theory: How Disease And Climate Change Toppled The Roman Empire

The Roman Colosseum - September 26, 2009.
Credit Yellow.Cat / Flickr Creative Commons

University of Oklahoma historian Kyle Harper says there have been thousands of answers to what caused the fall of the Roman Empire. Overexpansion, economics, and the rise of Christianity are all valid explanations, but he’s exploring the role of disease and climate change.

“When we look back at the Roman Empire now, we can see that changes in the Romans' environment, both the climate, but also the kind of species that live in and around humans, especially pathogens, play an enormous role in the collapse,” Harper says.

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