space

Native American
4:11 pm
Mon May 11, 2015

Northwest Indian College Aims For The Stars

Christian Cultee, a student at the Northwest Indian College, with a rocket that broke the sound barrier. (Courtesy Joshua McNichols/KUOW)

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 1:28 pm

In and around Seattle, tech billionaires and aerospace engineers are fomenting a local aerospace revolution. Aeronautics programs are taking off in schools, introducing kids to this growing industry. But opportunities don’t always trickle out to the poorest parts of the state. Now, one program on the Lummi Indian Reservation outside Bellingham, Washington is trying to change that. It’s the Northwest Indian College Space Center.

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Science, Technology and Environment
1:47 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

25 Years Later, What's Next For Hubble?

The sparkling centerpiece of Hubble’s silver anniversary fireworks is a giant cluster of about 3,000 stars called Westerlund 2. Credits: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), A. Nota (ESA/STScI), and the Westerlund 2 Science Team

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 1:41 pm

It was 25 years ago that Hubble Space Telescope launched into space. The 44-foot orbiting telescope has made 1.2 million observations of celestial bodies far into the reaches of the universe. It has helped change the understanding of space, and it’s made nebulae and black holes the thing of elementary school classrooms.

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Children's Books
2:11 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

An Astronaut Uses Books To Launch Kids Into Science

Former NASA astronaut Mark Kelly wants to encourage children to dream big and maybe even dream of launching into space. Pictured, a nighttime scene of the eastern North Atlantic taken from the International Space Station on Mar. 28, 2012. (NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 1:45 pm

Mark Kelly and his twin brother Scott were both NASA astronauts. Scott is scheduled to embark on a year-long mission to the International Space Station later this month.

Mark retired from NASA to spend more time with his wife, Arizona congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords who was shot at a public appearance in 2011.

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Space
2:41 pm
Fri March 6, 2015

A New Dawn: NASA Spacecraft Reaches Ceres

Ceres is seen from NASA's Dawn spacecraft on March 1, just a few days before the mission achieved orbit around the previously unexplored dwarf planet. The image was taken at a distance of about 30,000 miles (about 48,000 kilometers). (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

Originally published on Fri March 6, 2015 2:00 pm

After eight years and 3 billion miles, NASA’s “Dawn” spacecraft finally slipped into orbit around Ceres, a dwarf planet between Mars and Jupiter. The big moment happened at 7:39 a.m. Eastern time and it’s a historic mission on many levels.

Dawn is the world’s first attempt at a double encounter in space; the vessel first traveled to Vesta, one of the largest asteroids in the Solar System, and after 14 months, started its journey to Ceres.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
12:26 pm
Tue February 10, 2015

The Moon Like You Have Never Seen It Before

YouTube

Originally published on Tue February 10, 2015 8:58 am

There are many invisible realities that lie hidden from us. Some things happen too fast for us to see. Some things are too small to see. Some things are too far away. Some things, however, are right in front of us, but we are just in the wrong position to get a clear view.

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Science, Technology and Environment
7:11 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Discussions Begin For Space Flight Training Program In Oklahoma

Southern Lights Captured from Space
NASA

Discussions have begun to potentially start a Space Flight Participant Training Program, according to Dr. Stephen McKeever, Oklahoma's Secretary of Science and Technology at an Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority (OSIDA) meeting Wednesday.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
1:26 pm
Tue September 9, 2014

Can We Jump-Start A New Space Age?

An artist's view of BoldlyGo's SCIM mission in which a probe would skim the Martian atmosphere capturing dust particles and returning them to Earth.
BoldlyGo Institute, Inc.

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 1:42 pm

Jon Morse, former astrophysics division director at NASA, can remember the exact moment he knew things had to change.

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Science and Technology
1:58 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

NASA Chief On Past And Future Of U.S. Space Program

A Perseid meteor streaks through the Earth's atmosphere, as seen and photographed by astronaut Ron Garan while aboard the International Space Station on August 13, 2011. (NASA)

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 1:46 pm

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson for a wide-ranging conversation about the past and future of NASA’s effort to explore the universe.

Bolden discusses the future of the International Space Station and U.S. cooperation with Russia, and he weighs the chances that NASA will discover life in the Milky Way galaxy.

Bolden says that the U.S. will be able to send astronauts to space again by 2017, with the help of American private industry.

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Space
3:04 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Rosetta Space Probe Reaches Distant Comet

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is pictured from a distance of 177 miles on Aug. 3, 2014, by Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera. (ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team via AP)

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 12:41 pm

It’s been a very long journey — 10 years, five months and four days.

The European Space Agency announced this morning that the Rosetta space probe has finally arrived at its destination: a comet 450 million miles away, called 67P or Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Rosetta is now closely following the comet, and the agency hopes it will soon execute the first-ever gentle landing on a comet.

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The Two-Way
5:31 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Repairs Done, Astronauts Wrap Up Spacewalk

Astronaut Mike Hopkins during Saturday's spacewalk. He's going out again Tuesday.
NASA.gov

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 3:12 pm

Spacewalking astronauts have successfully replaced a failed coolant pump on the International Space Station.

NPR's Joe Palca reports that American spacewalkers Michael Hopkins and Rick Mastracchio had to bolt the massive pump in place (on the ground, it weighs 780 pounds), connect four ammonia lines and plug in five electrical cables. The ammonia is a refrigerant used in the station's two-part cooling system, which is necessary to dissipate heat from the onboard electrical equipment.

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