Ten Commandments

ccb621 / Flickr Creative Commons

A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit that challenges a Ten Commandments monument on the grounds of the Oklahoma state Capitol.

U.S. District Judge Robin Cauthron handed down an order Tuesday that dismissed the lawsuit filed by a New Jersey-based nonprofit group, American Atheists Inc., and two of its members in January 2014. Cauthron ruled that the group lacked legal standing to file the lawsuit.

An attorney for the group, Eric O Husby of Tampa, Florida, says he disagrees with the ruling but that no decision has been made to appeal it.

Oklahoma State Capitol
Steve/Flickr

A Ten Commandments monument on the Oklahoma Capitol grounds that was destroyed by a man who ran over it with his vehicle has been replaced.

Workers from a Kansas-based memorial company reinstalled a new granite monument on Thursday.

Gary Mosier with Wilbert Memorials said the 2,400-pound monument is made from granite from a quarry in South Dakota. The design was added at the company's facility in Kansas.

Oklahoma State Legislature

A Republican legislator whose family paid $10,000 for a Ten Commandments monument at the center of lawsuit says he has ordered a new one after someone drove a car across the statehouse lawn and smashed it into pieces.

State Rep. Mike Ritze of Broken Arrow says he has ordered an identical Ten Commandments monument that is under construction. Like the first one, he says it will be built entirely with private money and that a fundraiser is ongoing.

@jbtaylor / Flickr Creative Commons

Federal authorities have detained a man who they say admitted to driving a car into a disputed Ten Commandments monument outside the Oklahoma Capitol building, smashing it to pieces.

U.S. Secret Service agent David Allison says the man was detained Friday after he showed up at a federal building in Oklahoma City, rambling and making derogatory statements about the president.

Allison says the man admitted to destroying the monument and claimed Satan told him to do it.

bungasagadue / Flickr.com

 

An Oklahoma County judge has dismissed a lawsuit that challenges a Ten Commandments monument on the grounds of the state Capitol.

District Judge Thomas Prince granted Friday the motion filed by the Oklahoma Capitol Preservation Commission.

The lawsuit alleged the monument violates the state constitution's ban against using public property to support "any sect, church, denomination or system of religion."

Attorneys for the American Civil Liberties Union of Oklahoma, which filed the lawsuit last year, say they will appeal to the state Supreme Court.

John Taylor / Flickr.com

An Oklahoma County judge has postponed deciding whether to dismiss a lawsuit challenging a Ten Commandments located on the grounds of the state Capitol.

District Judge Thomas Prince ruled Friday there are technical problems with a motion to dismiss the case. Prince ordered that a new motion and legal briefs be filed and rescheduled the hearing for Sept. 12.

State Rep. John Bennett (R-Sallisaw)
Provided / Oklahoma House of Representatives

An eastern Oklahoma legislator is pushing a bill that would allow for more Ten Commandments monuments on public grounds and buildings.

The bill filed this week by Sallisaw Republican Rep. John Bennett authorizes schools, cities and counties to display monuments or memorials dedicated to "historical documents."

The bill specifically references the Ten Commandments, U.S. Constitution, Bill of Rights and Magna Carta, among others.

A Republican state senator from Enid is filing a bill authorizing a monument of the Bill of Rights to the U.S. Constitution to be placed on the Capitol grounds.

Sen. Patrick Anderson announced on Friday his plans to introduce the bill during the legislative session that begins in February.

The bill calls for the privately funded monument to be placed at the Capitol, and Anderson says more than two dozen legislators already have signed on as co-authors.

arjuna_zbycho / Flickr.com

A Hindu leader from Nevada is the latest to inquire about erecting a monument at the Oklahoma Capitol.

nzhamstar / Flickr.com

Legislative leaders in Oklahoma are seeking to ease public concern over a plan by a group of Satanists to erect a monument at the state Capitol.

Both House Speaker T.W. Shannon and Senate President Pro Tem Brian Bingman suggested Monday that such a plan was far from a reality. Members of the committee that would need to approve the monument sounded skeptical.

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