tuition

Lindsay Whelchel / Oklahoma Watch

The number of out-of-state students attending Oklahoma’s public universities and colleges has more than doubled in just over a decade as schools increasingly rely on nonresident tuition to supplement their budgets.

From 2000 to 2013, the number of nonresident undergraduate students enrolled in public colleges and universities jumped to 22,169 from 10,129, an increase of 119 percent. The nonresidents hail from all 50 states. Nearly half of them are Texans.

In-state enrollment rose by 12 percent, to 135,842, according to data obtained from the State Regents for Higher Education and analyzed by Oklahoma Watch. That rate matched state population growth.

The portion of what colleges call their “educational and general primary budgets” provided by out-of-state tuition also jumped significantly over the 13-year period. The enrollment figures do not include graduate or international students.

Most Oklahoma Colleges And Universities Raise Tuition

Jun 27, 2014
Madeline Stebbins / KGOU

The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education approved tuition and fee increases for 23 of 25 Oklahoma's colleges and universities. School presidents presented their proposed increases before the regents Wednesday.

The average percentage increase for undergraduate resident tuition and mandatory fees is 5.8 percent, according to data provided by the Regents.

Madeline Stebbins / KGOU

The University of Oklahoma Board of Regents has approved a nearly 5 percent tuition and fees increase for the next school year.

The Norman Transcript's John Shinn reports that under the plan approved Monday, the per-credit-hour rate will increase by $5.70 to $137.60 for in-state residents, and by $19.50 to $425.80 for out-of-state residents. The regents also approved tuition increases of 5.64 percent for Cameron University and 7 percent for Rogers State University.

Shauniqua Epps was accepted to three public colleges, but none gave her any aid. Increasingly, public universities have been shifting their aid away from the poor, leaving students like Epps with few options.
Andrew Renneisen / ProPublica

This story from ProPublica was co-published with The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Shauniqua Epps was the sort of student that so many colleges say they want.

She was a high achiever, graduating from high school with a 3.8 GPA and ranking among the top students in her class. She served as secretary, then president, of the student government. She played varsity basketball and softball. Her high-school guidance counselor, in a letter of recommendation, wrote that Epps was "an unusual young lady" with "both drive and determination."

Epps, 19, was also needy.

It’s well known that college tuition and student debt rose steeply in Oklahoma over the past decade. But less familiar is how that trend has played out at individual colleges and types of schools.

The interactive graphic above adds clarity to the picture.

In the chart, each circle represents a school, is sized by enrollment and is colored by type of college – public, nonprofit or for-profit.

Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The University of Oklahoma says it will start offering students a flat-rate tuition and mandatory fees this fall.

OU President David Boren announced Thursday that full-time undergraduates taking between 12 and 21 credit hours per semester will pay a rate based on the university's current 15-credit hour rate for tuition and mandatory fees.

“Changing from a per-credit hour basis to a flat rate encourages all of our students to complete their degrees in a shorter period of time and get the best possible value for their tuition and fees dollar,” Boren said in a statement.