Ukraine

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss two sides of international education. China has charged an education advocate in Tibet with inciting separatism, and a one-room basement library in Afghanistan is providing books to citizens once ruled by the Taliban.

Then contributor Joshua Landis talks with Jeffrey Mankoff from the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He argues the U.S. tried to outsource solving the Ukraine crisis onto German Chancellor Angela Merkel. They’ll also discuss Russia’s involvement in Syria.

Jeffrey Mankoff during an October 2014 Center for Strategic and International Studies forum on Russia's war, Ukraine's history, and the West's options.
Center for Strategic and International Studies / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Russia rapidly moved to the front of the world stage when President Vladimir Putin returned to power in 2012, setting off an adversarial relationship with the West not seen since Cold War tensions thawed in the 1980s.

The country’s ascendancy includes the 2014 invasion of Ukraine’s Crimea region, and a greater role in Syria on the side of the regime of Bashar al-Assad. Syria is fighting rebels opposed to Assad’s minority Alawite-led government as well as Islamic State, or ISIS, militants bent on establishing a caliphate in the Middle East.

Suzette Grillot and Brian Hardzinski discuss Catalonia's push for independence from Spain, and Russia's "frozen zone" in the troubled region of eastern Ukraine.

Then Rebecca Cruise talks with Peter Lochery. He’s the Director of Water for the Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere, or CARE, and won the University of Oklahoma WaTER Center's 2015 Internaitonal Water Prize.

Heavy weaponry is moved through eastern Ukraine, disrupting day-to-day life.
OSCE Special Monitoring Mission to Ukraine / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

It’s been almost two years since pro-Russian unrest took hold in Ukraine, dividing the country along ideological lines and leading to Russia’s annexation of Crimea.

As the second anniversary of the Euromaidan movement’s genesis approaches, nearly three million people are living in what The New York Times' Andrew Kramer describes as a “frozen zone.”

Provided / World Neighbors

Kate Schecter’s passion for internationalism started almost before she could talk. Her dad was a journalist for Time Magazine, and she spent the first dozen years of her life overseas in Hong Kong, Japan, and Russia. Her childhood in Moscow coincided with the height of the Cold War.

“My parents made a decision to send all five kids to Soviet public schools,” Schecter told KGOU’s World Views. And we’re the first American children to go to Soviet Schools. And I learned Russian [laughs]. Very quickly.”

Syria Comment blogger Joshua Landis provides analysis of President Bashar Assad’s interview this week with the BBC, and Rebecca Cruise discusses German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s visit with President Obama, and what they’re trying to accomplish regarding Ukraine. 

Then Rebecca talks with Kathryn Bolkovac, who sued her employers for unfair dismissal after she lost her job for trying to expose sex trafficking in Bosnia. Her story was dramatized in the 2010 film The Whistleblower.

President Obama said Monday Russian aggression against Ukraine has reinforced the unity of the U.S. and its partners in Europe and around the world.

Obama spoke at a joint news conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. He says if Russia continues on its current course, its political and economic isolation will worsen.

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis discuss the turmoil in Iraq caused by ISIS. Rebecca Cruise reports on state of Ukraine and its possible cease fire with Russia.

Later in the program, an interview with Boston College Near East Historian and political scientist Franck Salameh about the many dialects of Arabic and the future of teaching it.

Conditional Ceasefire Reached In Eastern Ukraine

Sep 5, 2014
Insurgents in Donetsk.
Andrew Butko / Wikimedia Commons

The Ukrainian Government announced Friday it signed a preliminary protocol to start a ceasefire with pro-Russian rebels.

Brokered by Russian President Vladimir Putin in Minsk, Belarus, the ceasefire went into effect at 6 p.m. local time (10 a.m. Central). Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko confirmed the agreement on Twitter:

There are new reports today that Russian troops are on the ground in eastern Ukraine. Moscow continues to deny that. And as President Obama heads to Estonia today, a top Russian official says his country will alter its military doctrine toward NATO in response to what it says is the alliance’s aggressive stance on what’s happening in eastern Ukraine.

Yesterday, NATO’s secretary general said the alliance will develop a quick response strike force of several thousand soldiers who could be on standby to respond to a crisis.

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