water

StateImpact Oklahoma
1:08 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Oklahoma Drought Easing In The West, Intensifying In The East

The July 1 update of the U.S. Drought Monitor.
Credit U.S. Drought Monitor

All the recent wet weather in western Oklahoma has put a big dent in the severity of the ongoing drought there.

But as one part of the state celebrates above-average rainfall, a state climatologist says eastern Oklahoma — which has been spared the brunt of the drought so far — is getting dryer.

From The Oklahoman‘s Silas Allen:

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StateImpact Oklahoma
9:36 am
Thu June 26, 2014

Why Norman Is The Only Oklahoma Town Where Citizens Control the Price of Water

Harold Heiple, chairman of Norman's charter review committee, addresses the city council in Norman June 17.
Logan Layden StateImpact Oklahoma

Norman is the only city in Oklahoma where utility rates are determined by a vote of the people — who aren’t always willing to charge themselves more for water.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
7:10 am
Thu June 26, 2014

Study: Climate Change Challenges Oklahoma’s Temperature-Sensitive Economy

Future temperature changes pose serious risks to the climate-sensitive agricultural and energy industries in Oklahoma and other Great Plains states, a new study on the business and economic effects of climate change concludes.

Oklahoma's average summer temperature range is expected to increase from 81.7-83.58°F to 87.0-93.51°F from 2020 to 2099, the report predicts.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
11:43 am
Thu June 19, 2014

Norman Voters Will Still Decide Water Rates As Charter Change Gets Rejected

Credit Pro-Zak / Flickr Creative Commons

Norman is the only city in Oklahoma where water rate increases require a vote of the public. And as StateImpact reported, a proposal to strike that clause from the city’s charter was before the city council on June 18, which would’ve put the change on the November ballot.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
7:27 am
Thu June 19, 2014

Norman’s Choice: Wastewater Reuse Or Reliance On Oklahoma City’s Pipelines

Lake Thunderbird, near Norman, Okla., in June 2013.
Kristina And David Flickr Creative Commons

Oklahoma’s third largest city is at a water crossroads.

Norman is updating its strategic water supply plan to make sure it has enough to meet growing demand over the next 50 years. And the city council’s choice is between reliance on Oklahoma City and water from southeast Oklahoma, or reusing its own wastewater.

After two years of study and public input, more than a dozen plans were narrowed down to two, portfolio 14 and portfolio 13.

Portfolio 14

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StateImpact Oklahoma
10:03 am
Tue June 17, 2014

The Unique Way Norman Sets Its Water, Sewer Rates Could Be Changing

Melissa Megginson Flickr Creative Commons

Norman is the only city in Oklahoma that requires water rate increases to be approved through a vote of the people, which at times has stymied attempts to upgrade aging water infrastructure, and makes planning for future expenses difficult.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
12:08 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Weakening Drought And Industry Trends Raise Hopes For Cattle Herd Rebound

Cows Graze in Kay County, Okla.
Credit fireboat895 / Flickr Creative Commons

With drought in retreat — at least for the moment — the U.S. cattle herd, which has been severely damaged by shrinking water supplies and withering grazing land in the face of rising demand, might begin to trend back up.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
6:54 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Norman Narrows Its Options For How To Have Enough Water in 2060

A water tower in Norman, Okla.
Credit Melissa Megginson / Flickr Creative Commons

At a public meeting on Tuesday, residents in Norman — where the water system is stressed due to population growth and age, and drought has taken a toll on already troubled Lake Thunderbird — heard about the city’s two options for water sustainability through 2060.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
11:52 am
Thu May 29, 2014

What Became Of The Bills StateImpact Followed This Legislative Session?

The Oklahoma Senate.
Credit Becky McCray / Flickr Creative Commons

From the start of the legislative session on February 3rd, StateImpact Oklahoma had its eye on what was sure to be a heated issue: the coming expiration of a tax credit for horizontally drilled oil and gas wells. Without action, rates would go from one-percent for the first four years of a well’s life, back to 7 percent.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
7:35 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Norman Lawmakers Push Wastewater Reuse In Search For Long-Term Water Fix

Lake Thunderbird in Norman, Oklahoma - June 2013
Kristina and David Flickr Creative Commons

Norman’s water problems are well documented. From dwindling supplies at Lake Thunderbird — the city’s deeply troubled main source of water — to anoverstressed and aging water treatment plant. Not to mention the outcry over the use of drinking water to drill an oil well with the public under mandatory conservation rules.

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