water

StateImpact Oklahoma
10:49 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Other States Have Outsize Influence In Oklahoma’s Scenic River Protection Policy

Bob Deitrick of Owasso stands along the banks of the Upper Illinois River at the Round Hollow public access point north of Tahlequah, Okla. The headwaters of this river are in Arkansas.
Joe Wertz StateImpact Oklahoma

This is part two of StateImpact Oklahoma’s four-part series on the history of Oklahoma’s scenic rivers and the environmental threats they face. Part one is available here.

Bob Deitrick checks the snaps on his bright orange life vest, crouches and checks all the gear one last time. The Owasso father’s son and his two friends are behind him, impatiently paddling in circles.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
8:17 am
Thu August 14, 2014

Flaming Waterways And Death Threats: The History Of Oklahoma’s Scenic Rivers

A group of Tulsa bartenders prepare for a day on the Illinois River at Diamondhead Resort near Tahlequah, Okla.
Logan Layden StateImpact Oklahoma

This is part one of StateImpact Oklahoma’s four-part series on the history of Oklahoma’s scenic rivers and the threats they face. 

The six eastern Oklahoma waterways classified as scenic rivers are each examples of the pristine beauty of that part of the state. They’re also tourist magnets. Even on a Monday morning, rowdy Tulsans pile into a bus at Diamondhead Resort and rumble toward the nearest access point into the Illinois River.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
6:35 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Dwindling Drought Doesn’t Mean A Slowdown In Water Conservation Efforts

The July 29 update of the U.S. Drought Monitor, which doesn't reflect the full impact of this week's rainfall.
Credit U.S. DROUGHT MONITOR

Despite more than 80 percent of the state still being under some level of drought, recent wet weather and below average temperatures continue to reduce the severity and size of drought in Oklahoma.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
11:14 am
Wed July 23, 2014

Federal Money Flows To Oklahoma For Water Infrastructure Fixes

Broken Bow Dam
Christopher Caldwell Flickr Creative Commons

Over the past week, Oklahoma has secured more than $37 million in federal funding for dam improvements across the state and for water system repairs in communities with aging pipes and treatment plants.

First, on July 18, the federal government announced a national dam assessment and repair program made possible by an “almost 21 fold” increase in funding for watershed rehabilitation under the 2014 Farm Bill. $26.4 million will go to Oklahoma.

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Science and Technology
7:13 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Oklahoma Granted $26 million In Federal Dollars For Watershed Program

Credit U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library / Wikipedia Commons

Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Chief Jason Weller announced Friday that Oklahoma will be receiving $26 million of the $262 million federal dollars that are being allotted for dam rehabilitation. This appropriation was achieved through the passage of the 2014 Farm Bill.

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Water
10:21 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Officials To Study Oklahoma Water Shortage Solutions

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is planning in-depth studies to prevent water supply shortages in western Oklahoma.

Planning specialists will study three of the state's twelve "Hot Spot" basins identified in a 2012 water plan as expected to have the most water supply challenges within the next 50 years.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
8:41 am
Thu July 17, 2014

Why The OKC Coalition To Pump Water From Southeast Oklahoma Fell Apart

Mitchell Logan supervises a pump station near Macomb, the 100-mile Atoka Pipeline's last stop on its way to the Oklahoma City metro.
Joe Wertz StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma City has been pumping water out of southeast Oklahoma along the Atoka pipeline for 50 years.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
1:08 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Oklahoma Drought Easing In The West, Intensifying In The East

The July 1 update of the U.S. Drought Monitor.
Credit U.S. Drought Monitor

All the recent wet weather in western Oklahoma has put a big dent in the severity of the ongoing drought there.

But as one part of the state celebrates above-average rainfall, a state climatologist says eastern Oklahoma — which has been spared the brunt of the drought so far — is getting dryer.

From The Oklahoman‘s Silas Allen:

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StateImpact Oklahoma
9:36 am
Thu June 26, 2014

Why Norman Is The Only Oklahoma Town Where Citizens Control the Price of Water

Harold Heiple, chairman of Norman's charter review committee, addresses the city council in Norman June 17.
Logan Layden StateImpact Oklahoma

Norman is the only city in Oklahoma where utility rates are determined by a vote of the people — who aren’t always willing to charge themselves more for water.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
7:10 am
Thu June 26, 2014

Study: Climate Change Challenges Oklahoma’s Temperature-Sensitive Economy

Future temperature changes pose serious risks to the climate-sensitive agricultural and energy industries in Oklahoma and other Great Plains states, a new study on the business and economic effects of climate change concludes.

Oklahoma's average summer temperature range is expected to increase from 81.7-83.58°F to 87.0-93.51°F from 2020 to 2099, the report predicts.

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