water

StateImpact Oklahoma
12:35 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Canton Business Owners On The Brink Months After Oklahoma City Water Withdrawal

Jeff Converse of the Canton Lake Association stands in front of a boat ramp he says has been surrounded by mud and weeds since Oklahoma City withdrew water from the lake in January.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Canton, Oklahoma — population 625 — is a town on the brink. Canton relies on lake season, and lake season never really got started this year.

At the first of the year, Oklahoma City took water from Canton Lake to meet demand at the height of the drought. While that decision kept faucets flowing in the metro, it threatens the very existence of Canton the community.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
8:24 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Duncan Weighs Its Water Options As Area Lakes Continue to Dwindle

Credit J. STEPHEN CONN / Flickr Creative Commons

City officials in Duncan, Okla., are looking for ways to keep from running out of water.

If drought conditions continue as they have over the last couple of years, the city of more than 23,000 will see its water supplies totally depleted by the end of 2016, according to a story in the Duncan Banner. 

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

World Views: November 1, 2013

Listen to the entire November 1, 2013 episode.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the implications of the Roma child found living with a couple in Greece, and the October 26 protest by Saudi women in defiance of the country's traditions against driving.

Later, a conversation about water and sanitation in Africa with the University of Oklahoma 2013 International Water Prize winner Ada Oko-Williams, and University College London hydrogeologist Richard Taylor.

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World Views
12:06 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

Amount Of Water In Africa Not The Problem, But Delivery To People

Women and children gather around a communal water pump in Lulimba, Democratic Republic of The Congo.
Credit Julien Harneis / Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Ada Oko-Williams and Richard Taylor.

Ada Oko-Williams grew up in Nigeria, a country with more than 160 million people, but where only half the population has access to safe drinking water. Even fewer people have acceptable sanitary facilities.

She now lives and works in Sierra Leone, and over the past half-decade has worked with charities and non-governmental organizations in West Africa to create open-defecation free communities that benefit hundreds of thousands of people. Oko-Williams says the health problems associated with unsafe drinking water are well-known, but there are other dimensions to a lack of access.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
12:49 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Why Oklahoma City Won’t Tap Water From The Aquifer Under Its Own Feet

The Garber-Wellington Aquifer is part of the Central Oklahoma aquifer, which every major city in the region uses — except Oklahoma City.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Moving water from the southeast Oklahoma to Oklahoma City is highly controversial. The battle over who controls water across most of that part of the state still has the state, city and tribal governments tied up in court after more than two years.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
9:19 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Texas’ Application For Oklahoma Water Still Active Despite Supreme Court Ruling

Credit Mark Fischer / Flickr Creative Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court in June sided with Oklahoma, ruling the interstate Red River water compact did not entitle Texas to water within Oklahoma’s borders.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
12:31 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

After Decade Of Consideration, State Caps Withdrawals From Oklahoma’s Most Sensitive Aquifer

A larger than usual crowd packs the OWRB's monthly meeting in Midwest City to hear the board vote Wednesday afternoon.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Supporters let out a big cheer Wednesday after the Oklahoma Water Resources Board voted to cap the amount of water that can be taken from the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, the source of drinking water for communities across a large area of south-central Oklahoma.

The decision was 10 years in the making, and came about — in part — because some landowners were concerned that limestone and sand mining was draining the aquifer too quickly.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
3:23 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Despite State Assistance, Water Problems Worsening in Konawa

Justin Johnson, a wastewater treatment plant operator in Konawa, OK, stands near some of the town's water wells in December 2012.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Many of the 1,500 or so residents of Konawa, in Seminole County, are once again without water as the town continues to grapple with the ongoing breakdown of the pipes, mains, and pumps that deliver water to homes and businesses.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
4:32 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Tulsa Escaping Worst Of Drought, But ‘Abnormally Dry’ Conditions Taking A Toll

Arkansas River near Tulsa, Okla.
Credit OakleyOriginals / Flickr Creative Commons

Tulsa has been spared the worst effects of Oklahoma’s drought, which has been concentrated in western and southwestern regions of the state.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
11:18 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Q&A: Oklahoma’s New Secretary Of Energy And Environment

Now-retired Col. Michael Teague commanded the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tulsa District, which includes Lake Eufaula, a lake that illustrates the delicate balance of different water needs in Oklahoma.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Traditionally, Oklahoma’s governor has relied on advice from separate officials representing energy and the environment.

But in July, Gov. Mary Fallin moved to combine the two offices into one. “Strong energy policy is strong environmental policy,” Fallin said in a statement accompanying an executive order creating the new Secretary of Energy and Environment cabinet secretary post.

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