KGOU

Ted Streuli

Editor, The Journal Record

Ted Streuli is the editor of The Journal Record, a weekday newspaper and online publisher of business, political and legal news for Oklahoma. He regularly reports for the Business Intelligence Report, heard each week on KGOU.

Streuli has led The Journal Record’s newsroom since 2004. He has nearly 30 years of journalism experience, having worked at newspapers in Oklahoma, Texas and California.

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Firefighters stock a truck with supplies inside Oklahoma City Fire Department Station 1 after responding to an accident at NW 23rd Street and Classen Boulevard on Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Tuesday the Oklahoma City Council set a special election for January 10 to resolve a million-dollar dispute with the local firefighters union.

That decision could cost taxpayers as much as $100,000. The council’s 6-0 vote set aside an arbitrator’s decision, which means they have to put a proposed contract with the firefighters to a vote of the people, The Journal Record’s Brian Brus reports:

Renovation continues on the Sunshine Cleaners building at 1012 NW First St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

In April the Oklahoma City Council approved $550,000 in tax increment financing, or TIF money, for the dilapidated Sunshine Cleaners building just west of downtown.

About the only remarkable thing about the building two blocks from the Oklahoma County Jail is its beautiful neon sign. The roof has caved in, the windows are broken, and satellite imagery even shows an abandoned vehicle inside the building.

Oklahoma City University professor Kyle Dean presents findings of an economic impact report during the Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association conference Tuesday in Tulsa.
Rip Stell / The Journal Record

Casinos in rural Oklahoma bring in about half of all gaming revenue, and the small towns these establishments call home reap some of the rewards.

A report presented at the Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association conference Tuesday revealed that small, rural towns get an economic boost when a tribal casino opens, The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming reports:

Lt. Gen. Lee Levy II, sustainment commander at Tinker Air Force Base, addresses the audience during the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber’s Tinker Leadership Community luncheon Friday at the Skirvin Hilton Hotel in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Tinker Air Force Base Lt. Gen. Lee Levy II says there aren’t enough computer scientists to meet workforce demands at either the base, or for private contractors like Boeing or Lockheed Martin.

Levy envisions the first signs of the next major war being electronic, when automatic teller machines suddenly don’t work, or the internet goes down, according to The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry-Cobo:

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